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NEWS
April 22, 2013
When only one of the extreme sides of each political party is hollering against a bipartisan agreement on any bill, no doubt that side is the only one getting hosed. A true bipartisan bill gets both sides upset. So now begins the spin game by trying to get the few remaining conservative Republicans left in the Senate and all the tea party conservatives in the House to play ball with this amnesty bill ("Getting to yes," April 18). Unfortunately, this bill tries to do everything in one swoop.
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SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
Scott Otto feared he was about to lose one of his most promising players to another sport, so the Nathan Hale High football coach approached sophomore Rick Wagner and offered a compromise. "I said, 'Ricky, I know you're into basketball, but I'd love for you to play football,'" Otto recalled. "Obviously, he was worried about injury, so I said, 'You know what, I'll put you at wide receiver. All you've got to do is catch passes.' At the time, he was probably 6-foot-4, 220 pounds. I said, 'This will actually help you with basketball.
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NEWS
April 15, 2013
Lawmakers didn't act on pit bull legislation this year because the bill under consideration didn't offer any solutions to the problem of dog attacks ("Pit bull compromise fails, trial lawyers win," April 10). Bravo for them. Here is a simple solution. Have the state or counties license and train dog owners who keep potentially dangerous breeds. Most attacks that end with death or injury to people or other animals could have been avoided if the owners understood their dogs. I am a lifelong animal lover, with dogs being my favorites.
NEWS
August 13, 2014
Soft love doesn't belong in education, but it is often a motivator in allowing our youth to proceed in the system without achieving the required knowledge. Yes, love may be a motivator in allowing a student to "do a project" instead of qualifying, although such compromises also cover up the failure of the system to have the student qualify. "Do a project instead of qualifying" is one of many examples of demand compromise which have spared some young people the hurt of a current failure while dooming them to future pain of inability to cope as adults.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2013
A compromise in the General Assembly over legislation to undo a court ruling that declared pit bulls inherently dangerous has unraveled, turning what had appeared to be a settled issue into a dogfight between two veteran legislators. The breakdown in the understanding between Sen. Brian E. Frosh and Del Luiz R.S. Simmons — both Montgomery County Democrats — raises the chances that owners of the breed will continue to face heightened liability and the possibility of eviction. "I am extremely disappointed in Brian Frosh," said Simmons.
NEWS
March 5, 2013
The gas tax plan unveiled this week by Gov. Martin O'Malley and the General Assembly's top leaders is a complicated proposal that wouldn't represent our first choice in how best to pay for Maryland's transportation needs. But, on balance, it's a better-than-expected solution to a problem that has been nagging the State House for two decades. Better than expected because efforts to increase the gas tax have been practically dead on arrival in Annapolis for years, thanks to high prices at the pump and public hostility toward anything that might raise them further - even as alternatives like vehicle registration and licensing fees hit Marylanders harder than a few pennies on the gallon would.
NEWS
January 19, 2010
Why has The Sun been quiet on the "Cadillac" health care plan debate? If you're an ordinary citizen who has a "Cadillac" health care plan, you will pay a 40 percent excise tax on the plan. Unless of course you're a union member or government employee and have a "Cadillac" plan. Then you will not pay the tax. President Obama promised to change the way Washington does business. Special interests and the influence of lobbyists was going to end. It's time for The Sun and the national media to call him on it. Len Bollinger Send your comments to talkback@baltimoresun.
NEWS
May 17, 1992
The United States is the world's largest industrial economy. It uses more energy than any other nation and is the greatest producer of greenhouse gases. Thus, no treaty such as that to be signed next month at Rio de Janeiro in a multinational summit on global warming could succeed without the cooperation of Americans. A compromise treaty, worked out after long, contentious negotiations between European and U.S. diplomats and environmental regulators, has opened the way for President Bush's participation in the summit.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2014
Maryland's courts should provide defendants with lawyers at their first bail hearings in Baltimore starting in February, with other areas following closely behind, plaintiffs in a long running dispute over the issue proposed Friday. The Court of Appeals ruled in September that criminal suspects have a right to a lawyer at their initial appearance before a court commissioner, but that right has been left in limbo since then as the state grapples with how to provide public defenders at potentially thousands of hearings.
NEWS
January 1, 2013
When push came to shove, Republicans and Democrats came together for a last-minute bi-partisan compromise on the so-called fiscal cliff, a combination of automatic spending cuts and tax increases that would have plunged the nation back into recession. The deal passed the Senate overwhelmingly after marathon negotiations between Minority Leader Mitch McConnell and Vice President Joe Biden. Just eight senators voted against it, and although it technically came after the midnight deadline, the New Year's holiday afforded Congress the chance to finalize the deal before the markets - or the general public - had time to react.
SPORTS
June 8, 2014
Problems in the Department of Veterans Affairs' medical system have been years in the making, and it's shameful that it took a scandal like the one now engulfing the department to prompt Congress to act. But the bi-partisan deal announced Thursday by Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders and Arizona Sen. John McCain appears to be a solid effort to put veterans' needs, not politics, at the forefront of the national response to the debacle. Inspectors general have found thousands of instances of veterans who had to endure long waits for care and cases in which VA officials sought to cover up the delays through secret wait-lists and other means.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2014
State lawmakers agreed Maryland's medical marijuana program was a flop, but only this weekend reached a tentative compromise on how to invent a medical marijuana industry from scratch. Both chambers passed bills to expand access to the drug, but face a Monday deadline to decide how many growers should be allowed to cultivate it and where patients could go to fill a prescription.  Key lawmakers working to revamp the state's medical marijuana law came to an agreement Friday. Only 15 growers would get licenses in the first year, but the state's medical marijuana commission could decide to allow more under a compromise reached between House sponsors and a Senate medical marijuana work group.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
Parents who have fought for years to get an elected school board in Baltimore County have won key support for a compromise measure that is given a good chance of passage in the General Assembly. The county's House and Senate delegations voted unanimously Thursday to endorse creation of a "hybrid" board consisting of seven elected and four appointed members, plus a student, starting in 2018. Supporters of the change have overcome objections by the county executive and believe they have also won over a committee chairwoman who had previously blocked the legislation.
NEWS
Tim Wheeler | February 26, 2014
If the third try's the charm, the Maryland Senate gave preliminary approval Wednesday to a bill aimed at untangling for the third time an emotional controversy over dog owners' liability if their pets bite someone. The bill would reverse a Court of Appeals opinion declaring that pit bulls are "inherently dangerous", a decision that has prompted many landlords in the state to evict the dogs - or threaten to kick out their owners - to avoid potential liability if someone is bitten on the premises.
NEWS
February 17, 2014
Every year, hundreds of Baltimore City teachers are injured at work by violent or unruly students, and many school employees believe such incidents have become more common in recent years as a result of the policies aimed a keeping troublesome students in class rather than suspending them. If that's the case in some schools, the policy is being misapplied. Reducing suspensions does not mean abandoning discipline or turning a blind eye to violence. Schools can still suspend fewer students without compromising school safety if teachers receive better training and principals support them by encouraging them to report violence and injuries promptly.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2014
Changes proposed by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake for Baltimore's controversial and so-far unsuccessful taxi tax drew mixed reviews from city taxi and livery firms. The proposed amendments to the tax, to be introduced before the City Council today, would switch the levy from 25 cents per passenger to 35 cents per trip for taxis starting July 1. The city implemented the tax Oct. 1, but many taxi operators simply ignored it, with some complaining and refusing to pay it. Others only began complying after they were allowed to pass the cost on to customers.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler | March 9, 2010
Builders, environmentalists and government officials have reached a compromise in a looming legislative fight that threatened to weaken Maryland's new storm-water pollution rules, they said Monday. The deal, hammered out over more than a week of negotiations, would head off a move by lawmakers in Annapolis to soften or delay by up to a decade the requirements for controlling runoff from development, which are supposed to take effect May 4. Environmentalists were girding for a major battle to defend the rules, which were written to tackle a significant and growing source of pollution that is fouling streams, rivers and the Chesapeake Bay. "Not everybody's going to be happy," said Del. Maggie L. McIntosh, chairwoman of the House Environmental Matters Committee, who pushed the feuding parties to work out their differences.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2014
Maryland's courts should provide defendants with lawyers at their first bail hearings in Baltimore starting in February, with other areas following closely behind, plaintiffs in a long running dispute over the issue proposed Friday. The Court of Appeals ruled in September that criminal suspects have a right to a lawyer at their initial appearance before a court commissioner, but that right has been left in limbo since then as the state grapples with how to provide public defenders at potentially thousands of hearings.
NEWS
January 17, 2014
The root cause for inequality, especially concerning health and economic advancement, stems from the tendency among a subset of humans who patronize only those individuals who are subservient to them ( "Inequality is the new norm in the U.S.," Jan. 15). From that viewpoint, I credit the majority of people of the United States for bending over backward to get ahead in life without knowingly hurting others or looking the other away when confronted with injustice. If there is a change to be made, society must understand the factors that modulate new ideas.
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