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NEWS
November 13, 2005
The county has scheduled more Grassroots Gatherings for residents to get involved in the Carroll County Comprehensive Plan. The Pathways Web site (car rollpathways.org) includes a calendar of all community meetings associated with the plan. Agendas for the fall meetings are available by clicking on the specific community meeting on the calendar section of the Web site. Interested people can register to be on an e-mail list at the "Contact Us" page. Meetings include: McKinstry's Mill/Linwood/Marston: 7 p.m. tomorrow, Linwood Brethren Church, 575 McKinstry's Mill Road.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake criticized the Police Department's handling of a high-profile police brutality investigation on Wednesday, and said she had directed the police commissioner to develop a "comprehensive" plan to address brutality in the agency. Speaking to reporters at City Hall, the mayor said top commanders should have quickly seen a video of an officer repeatedly punching a man, and should have moved immediately to take the officer off the street. "It is outrageous," Rawlings-Blake said of the conduct of the officer shown in the video, whom authorities have identified as Officer Vincent E. Cosom.
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NEWS
By ELMER LIPPY | October 23, 1994
The candidates for Carroll County commissioner on the Nov. 8 ballot, Republicans Donald I. Dell, Richard T. Yates and W. Benjamin Brown, and Democrats Elmer C. Lippy, Rebecca A. Orenstein and Grover N. "Sam" Sensabaugh, were asked to respond to the following questions: What existing measures will you use to control Carroll County's residential growth? What new measures are needed? Their responses appear below:The primary tool used to control growth in Carroll County is the comprehensive plan and the zoning ordinance and maps xTC which implement it. By continuing to support this overall plan, the majority of the county will remain rural with a very small amount of residential growth.
NEWS
June 12, 2014
Having lived in Dundalk for 44 of my 50 years, I have experienced the true nature of what Dundalk used to be: The "good" neighborhood with the "bad" reputation ( "A new brand for Dundalk," June 10). It was a place where hardworking blue-collar families took pride in their neighborhood, where yards, alleys, roads and sidewalks were well taken care of by residents and where neighborhood children respected what belonged to others. That was when Dundalk was a diamond in the rough, when the neighborhood needed to spark growth in by capitalizing on its location and its affordable housing stock.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | August 15, 2001
The Freedom Comprehensive Plan, a land-use program that will guide growth in South Carroll - the county's most populous area - for the next five years, won unanimous approval from the county commissioners yesterday. Steven C. Horn, county director of planning, reviewed comments from a public hearing last month before the commissioners' vote, the first major revision to the 1977 plan for the area, which has tripled in population in the past 24 years to nearly 30,000. The bulk of residents' concerns were with schools and roads that have not kept pace with development.
NEWS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | March 12, 1999
Planners from Carroll County and Westminster met last night to discuss the county's proposed comprehensive plan for the area surrounding the city.The plan will deal with issues such as traffic congestion and water availability."
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | August 23, 2004
Carroll County planners are asking residents living in the unincorporated areas around Westminster to air their ideas about the region's future. When planners open an informal workshop to the public on Wednesday, it will be the first time in five years that residents will have a forum to express opinions about the Westminster Environs Community Comprehensive Plan. The plan, in draft form, includes recommendations crafted after a series of public hearings in 1999. "Our objective is to weed out anything that is objectionable to the public initially," said Daphne P. Daly, one of the county's comprehensive planners and leader of the Westminster environs project.
NEWS
By ANNIE LINSKEY and ANNIE LINSKEY,SUN REPORTER | November 11, 2005
This week, Democrat Ellen O. Moyer defeated independent Gilbert T. Renaut and Republican George O. Kelley Sr., to become only the second mayor to be re-elected in Annapolis in the past 24 years. Moyer won 46 percent of the vote, Renaut had 36 percent and Kelley got 18 percent. The Sun sat down in a conference room next to the office of the city's first female mayor and talked about the campaign and her plans for the next term. You said on election night that Annapolis is clearly a divided city.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | September 25, 1998
A Carroll County planner recommended to the Finksburg Planning Area Council last night that it begin a two-year process leading to a comprehensive plan -- the first for the area since 1981. "This is a new process," said Daphne Quinn, a comprehensive planner for the county, "and there will be some give and take in how we go through it." Quinn plans to ask the county planning commission Oct. 20 to authorize a full update of the plan for the area. The so-called miniplan would focus on growth and zoning issues in Finksburg, which is unincorporated and has no officials to be consulted, unlike in the county's eight incorporated towns.
NEWS
By Donald F. Boesch | July 23, 2013
Climate change is real. The stakes are high and the time is short. In Maryland, we just have to think about last week's sweltering weather to get a look into our future. In 50 years, it could be a rare summer day when temperatures in Maryland do not reach well into the 90s, with high humidity and warm nights. Most days would have code orange air quality or worse as the heat raises ozone levels, even as we are reducing air pollution. While we typically experience only two or three days when temperatures exceed 100 degrees, this would likely grow to 30 or more days, with life-threatening heat waves punctuated by intense downpours and flash flooding.
NEWS
By Gwendolyn Glenn | July 10, 2013
The number of auto thefts in Prince George's County has dropped by more than 54 percent over the last five years, according to state figures. Laurel Police Department officials said the city has also seen a decreased number of auto thefts in recent years. In 2004, auto thefts were at epidemic levels in Prince George's with nearly 50 vehicles stolen daily. That year, more than 18,000 auto thefts were reported in the county, the highest number of stolen vehicles in Maryland. "In 2011, the last complete year for auto theft numbers, there were less than that many statewide (a total of 15,376)
NEWS
By Jeff Zients | April 15, 2013
President Barack Obama's Fiscal Year 2014 budget is a concrete plan to create jobs and cut the deficit. We do not need to choose between these two priorities. The president's balanced, compromise plan proves we can do both. The guiding principle behind the president's plan is reigniting America's engine of economic growth: a rising, thriving middle class. The plan is focused on addressing three fundamental questions: How do we attract more jobs to our shores? How do we equip our people with the skills needed to do the jobs of the 21st century?
NEWS
April 8, 2013
Baltimore's Lexington Market proudly calls itself the oldest continuously operating public market in the nation — and home to some of the best crab cakes in the world at its famed Faidley's Seafood cafe. Yet even a venerable landmark that's been in business since 1785 needs an occasional upgrade. That's why the announcement last week of plans for a $20 million to $25 million renovation of the market is welcome news for everyone who values its historical significance. But simply making cosmetic changes to the building's interior won't be enough to attract new vendors and customers to the site.
NEWS
By Allan Vought | February 8, 2013
What will the Town of Bel Air be like in five years? Or in 10 years? A comprehensive plan adopted by the Board of Town Commissioners at the Jan. 22 town meeting tries to answer these questions by looking at where the town is today, how it is perceived by residents and where it wants to go in the future. One of the basic conclusions of "Sustainable Bel Air 2013-18" is that town residents, business owners and government officials should work to protect and enhance what many of them already consider Bel Air's social and economic advantages, while at the same time protecting and nurturing its environmental assets.
NEWS
August 9, 2012
Given events like Snowmageddon, Hurricane Irene, and last month's derecho storm, it's no wonder officials are calling the recent uptick of extreme weather the "new normal" ("Severe weather renews climate-change talks in Washington, Annapolis," Aug. 1). To drive home the point, a recent Environment Maryland report confirms that extreme rainstorms and snowstorms are happening 55 percent more frequently in the Mid-Atlantic region than in 1948. And the strongest storms in Maryland are dumping 14 percent more precipitation.
NEWS
By Ken Ulman | July 29, 2012
The Columbia of my childhood, then known as "The Next America," was a place of innovation and excitement. It was known across the country as the herald for the next generation of great American communities. My parents and many others moved here in those days because it was a city founded on the principles of diversity and acceptance and guided by a ground-breaking plan that ensured a fertile "garden for growing people," as visionary developer James Rouse called it. But sometime in the early '90s, Columbia stopped innovating, and Jim Rouse's New City stalled.
NEWS
June 28, 2012
I don't doubt that MayorStephanie Rawlings-Blake's purchase of new phones was legal ("City Hall phone wars," June 26). What I don't know, and what the mayor has not told me, is how exactly this purchase is going to benefit the citizens of Baltimore. Convergence, the merging of voice, data and video to create a unified communication platform, is nothing new. Organizations much larger then the city have been deploying converged networks for many years. Some have been successful and realized cost savings and improved productivity.
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