Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCompote
IN THE NEWS

Compote

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Wendy Lin and Wendy Lin,NEWSDAY | February 23, 2000
Now that the holidays are long gone, it's time for food that pleases no one but ourselves. It's also a time to cut back on butter-rich baking in favor of sweet stove-top simmering. It's time for compotes. In the summer, compotes are made from peaches and berries. But winter compotes take advantage of citrus, pears, cranberries and dried fruit. "Compotes are a way of giving fruit a warm bath," says cookbook author Melanie Barnard. "And just like people, fruit perks up after a bath. It takes on a warm glow."
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | April 22, 2006
A few weeks ago, a friend and I co-hosted a soup party. The fete was a huge success. (Guests left late saying they couldn't remember having had a better time.) My co-chef was responsible for the soup and green salad, and we prepared the appetizers together. Desserts, however, were my domain, and I went all out serving a trio of confections. I baked a chocolate spice cake to offer with a warm chocolate sauce, and stopped by a well-known bakery to purchase some of its celebrated Florentine bars (shortbread baked with caramel, almonds and currants)
Advertisement
FEATURES
By EATING WELL MAGAZINE | July 31, 1996
As more and more Americans return to the pleasures of the table -- and a bit of dessert is no longer taboo -- pastry chefs are increasingly finding themselves in the celebrity spotlight previously reserved for executive chefs.There is a new surge of creativity in the profession. The rococo dessert spectacles of the '80s are giving way to sleeker, more sculptural, self-assured presentations.And as patrons have increasingly requested lower-fat desserts, American pastry chefs have added innovations in the art of low-fat cooking to their long list of talents.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | March 21, 2004
Centuries ago, American colonists discovered hidden gold when Native Americans showed them how to tap the trunks of the stately maple tree and to draw off the sap. When the liquid was boiled down it turned into a rich, golden syrup. In New England, this tradition endures today. Each year, the maple-tapping season begins around mid-February and lasts between four and six weeks. People come from miles away to visit farms with maple groves, where buckets hang from tree trunks to catch the sap. In this part of the country, the tapping season serves as culinary inspiration for many of us. Naturally, everyone thinks of breakfast fare.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre, R.D. and Colleen Pierre, R.D.,Contributing Writer | December 21, 1993
I asked my hairdresser how to get men to eat better.A new study of 50,000 men shows those with high-fat diets are twice as likely to develop prostate cancer as those who eat less fat. In fact, among those eating lots of fatty red meat, advancement to fatal stages was three times as great.He said fortunately he's been eating vegetables and brown rice lately to keep his weight down. He's fortysomething and still interested in women, so he wants to look good.He thinks most men are more receptive to the vanity approach than the fear tactic.
FEATURES
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | April 22, 2006
A few weeks ago, a friend and I co-hosted a soup party. The fete was a huge success. (Guests left late saying they couldn't remember having had a better time.) My co-chef was responsible for the soup and green salad, and we prepared the appetizers together. Desserts, however, were my domain, and I went all out serving a trio of confections. I baked a chocolate spice cake to offer with a warm chocolate sauce, and stopped by a well-known bakery to purchase some of its celebrated Florentine bars (shortbread baked with caramel, almonds and currants)
FEATURES
By Linda Lowe Morris and Linda Lowe Morris,Staff Writer | February 19, 1992
Ever since the Pavilion opened last May serving just lunch in the beautiful Hackerman House at the Walters Art Gallery, everyone has been asking, "When's dinner?" -- or words to that effect."The lunch crowd kept saying, 'When are you going to open at night? When are you going to open at night?' " says Eddie Dopkin, president of the Classic Catering People, the company that operates the restaurant.The answer is now. The elegant and airy 130-seat restaurant, located in what was once the back garden of Hackerman House, has just started serving dinner on Thursday and Friday nights.
FEATURES
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,Universal Press Syndicate | December 6, 1998
If "compotes" conjure up images of soggy prunes, it's time to give these elegant fruit dishes another taste. In the best compotes, fresh or dried fruit is poached in juice, wine or sugar syrup, creating an unusual flavor exchange and a melt-in-your-mouth texture. For dessert compotes, the fruit can be plumped in wine or spirits to tenderize and flavor it. Next time the menu calls for a healthful dessert or a make-ahead breakfast side dish, think compote.Need proof that a rich-tasting dessert needn't be high in fat?
FEATURES
By James. G. McCollam and James. G. McCollam,Copley News Service | January 26, 1992
Q: Enclosed is a photo of a candy dish marked "Royal Winton Chintz, Hand Painted, Made in England." It was purchased in the early 1900s. Can you tell me how much it might sell for?A: This was made by Grimwades Ltd. in Stoke, England, during the mid-20th century. It would probably sell for about $35 to $45.Q: This mark is on the bottom of a compote. It has a basket-weave rim and is supported by three Cupids. It is a fine-quality porcelain decorated with flowers of various colors. Please tell me what you can about its origin and value.
NEWS
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | May 9, 1999
My husband, social creature that he is, hates to eat dinner alone. When work takes me out of town, he hints to friends that he is a bachelor for a few days and, as a result, always wangles a supper invitation from our friends. That is what he did this week when I was away on business. Typically, he brings wine to the hosts to show his appreciation, but this time I suggested that he take dessert instead.I made this recommendation because the day before my departure I spent several hours in the kitchen working on a recipe for warm rhubarb and strawberry compotes garnished with orange-scented whipped cream.
FEATURES
By Wendy Lin and Wendy Lin,NEWSDAY | February 23, 2000
Now that the holidays are long gone, it's time for food that pleases no one but ourselves. It's also a time to cut back on butter-rich baking in favor of sweet stove-top simmering. It's time for compotes. In the summer, compotes are made from peaches and berries. But winter compotes take advantage of citrus, pears, cranberries and dried fruit. "Compotes are a way of giving fruit a warm bath," says cookbook author Melanie Barnard. "And just like people, fruit perks up after a bath. It takes on a warm glow."
NEWS
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | May 9, 1999
My husband, social creature that he is, hates to eat dinner alone. When work takes me out of town, he hints to friends that he is a bachelor for a few days and, as a result, always wangles a supper invitation from our friends. That is what he did this week when I was away on business. Typically, he brings wine to the hosts to show his appreciation, but this time I suggested that he take dessert instead.I made this recommendation because the day before my departure I spent several hours in the kitchen working on a recipe for warm rhubarb and strawberry compotes garnished with orange-scented whipped cream.
FEATURES
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,Universal Press Syndicate | December 6, 1998
If "compotes" conjure up images of soggy prunes, it's time to give these elegant fruit dishes another taste. In the best compotes, fresh or dried fruit is poached in juice, wine or sugar syrup, creating an unusual flavor exchange and a melt-in-your-mouth texture. For dessert compotes, the fruit can be plumped in wine or spirits to tenderize and flavor it. Next time the menu calls for a healthful dessert or a make-ahead breakfast side dish, think compote.Need proof that a rich-tasting dessert needn't be high in fat?
FEATURES
By EATING WELL MAGAZINE | July 31, 1996
As more and more Americans return to the pleasures of the table -- and a bit of dessert is no longer taboo -- pastry chefs are increasingly finding themselves in the celebrity spotlight previously reserved for executive chefs.There is a new surge of creativity in the profession. The rococo dessert spectacles of the '80s are giving way to sleeker, more sculptural, self-assured presentations.And as patrons have increasingly requested lower-fat desserts, American pastry chefs have added innovations in the art of low-fat cooking to their long list of talents.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre, R.D. and Colleen Pierre, R.D.,Contributing Writer | December 21, 1993
I asked my hairdresser how to get men to eat better.A new study of 50,000 men shows those with high-fat diets are twice as likely to develop prostate cancer as those who eat less fat. In fact, among those eating lots of fatty red meat, advancement to fatal stages was three times as great.He said fortunately he's been eating vegetables and brown rice lately to keep his weight down. He's fortysomething and still interested in women, so he wants to look good.He thinks most men are more receptive to the vanity approach than the fear tactic.
FEATURES
By Linda Lowe Morris and Linda Lowe Morris,Staff Writer | February 19, 1992
Ever since the Pavilion opened last May serving just lunch in the beautiful Hackerman House at the Walters Art Gallery, everyone has been asking, "When's dinner?" -- or words to that effect."The lunch crowd kept saying, 'When are you going to open at night? When are you going to open at night?' " says Eddie Dopkin, president of the Classic Catering People, the company that operates the restaurant.The answer is now. The elegant and airy 130-seat restaurant, located in what was once the back garden of Hackerman House, has just started serving dinner on Thursday and Friday nights.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | March 21, 2004
Centuries ago, American colonists discovered hidden gold when Native Americans showed them how to tap the trunks of the stately maple tree and to draw off the sap. When the liquid was boiled down it turned into a rich, golden syrup. In New England, this tradition endures today. Each year, the maple-tapping season begins around mid-February and lasts between four and six weeks. People come from miles away to visit farms with maple groves, where buckets hang from tree trunks to catch the sap. In this part of the country, the tapping season serves as culinary inspiration for many of us. Naturally, everyone thinks of breakfast fare.
FEATURES
By James. G. McCollam and James. G. McCollam,Copley News Service | January 26, 1992
Q: Enclosed is a photo of a candy dish marked "Royal Winton Chintz, Hand Painted, Made in England." It was purchased in the early 1900s. Can you tell me how much it might sell for?A: This was made by Grimwades Ltd. in Stoke, England, during the mid-20th century. It would probably sell for about $35 to $45.Q: This mark is on the bottom of a compote. It has a basket-weave rim and is supported by three Cupids. It is a fine-quality porcelain decorated with flowers of various colors. Please tell me what you can about its origin and value.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.