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By Amanda Yeager, ayeager@tribune.com | November 15, 2013
For America Recycles Day, Howard County is moving a step beyond your average blue bin. County Executive Ken Ulman spent Friday morning passing out a new kind of bin to residents of the Clarks Glen neighborhood in Clarksville. Instead of blue, it's green - and rather than collecting bottles and cans, participants fill it up with food scraps. The county is expanding its composting program to Clarks Glen and other neighborhoods in Clarksville and parts of Columbia, where of about 3,800 households, some 1,200 requested the free green bin. Ulman said composting was the next step in moving the county toward its zero-waste goal.
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By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
My new compost pile is attracting swarms of wasps. How do I handle this? Compost piles need many insect species on their decomposition team, but wasps don't make the cut. Late in summer, wasps crave sugars - making a nuisance of themselves at picnics and crawling into soda cans. However, in spring and summer they are beneficial predators who capture pest insects to feed to their offspring. So, their feasting on the sugars in kitchen scraps of your compost pile is a temporary situation.
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NEWS
By Amanda Yeager, ayeager@tribune.com | December 24, 2013
Neighbors filled three-quarters of the pews at Friendship Baptist Church in Sykesville last week to grill a local contracting company about its proposal to use farmland in the area as a mulching and wood composting facility. The proposal, from Howard County-based RLO Contractors, requests a conditional use for a composting facility at 1500 Route 32 in Sykesville, about 2.5 miles from the Carroll County line. At the community meeting Dec. 19, neighbors said they were concerned the facility would lower surrounding property values, citing the potential for unpleasant odors and noise generated by composting operations.
NEWS
By Quinn Kelley, The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2014
Baltimore County will hold its annual compost bin and rain barrel sale May 3, officials said Tuesday. Compost bins will sell for $35 and rain barrels for $50. The sale takes place at The Avenue at White Marsh, at 8125 Honeygo Blvd., in the auxiliary parking lot off Town Center Drive. The two-piece compost bins fit in all cars, while the one-piece rain barrel fits in most cars, officials said. Any individual can purchase as many bins as he or she desires - Baltimore County residency is not required.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | April 22, 2013
Talk about leading by example -- the Maryland Department of the Environment announced Monday that it would begin collecting food scraps at its Baltimore headquarters for composting. The Earth Day announcement comes on the heels of Howard County launching its own food-scrap processing facility, which I covered here for The Baltimore Sun. MDE will give its 900-plus employees the option to compost their uneaten food at the agency's main offices in Montgomery Park. Officials there say they hope in the effort's inaugural year to divert more than 6 tons of waste that might otherwise have gone to an incinerator or landfill.
NEWS
June 8, 1994
Amending the zoning code to allow Carroll County farmers to compost yard waste makes a lot of sense and would go a long way toward solving some current and future solid waste problems. This proposal should not be enacted without safeguards, however. Moreover, a farm-based composting program should not be seen as a green light for the county to end its own composting efforts.Given that state law now prohibits the dumping of yard waste into landfills and the fact that farmers are always looking for ways to increase revenue, expanding the amount of composting in Carroll would produce a variety of benefits.
NEWS
September 23, 1993
Earlier this month, Anne Arundel County stopped the long-standing, senseless practice of filling multi-million dollar, state-of-the-art landfills with harmless yard waste.In turn, the first phase of a new yard waste pick-up and composting program begins today and every resident who rakes a leaf should make sure he or she participates.This program isn't just for environmentalists; it should interest every citizen who cares about his or her tax dollar.Waste disposal represents one of the largest expenditures of county government, and the cost grows every year as state and federal standards for landfill liners, caps and monitoring become more stringent.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2013
Howard Hord considers himself a chef of sorts, but the food he works with is a little past its prime. Using moldy melon rinds, orange peels and other castoff fruit and vegetables from some Howard County kitchens, Hord is "cooking" the first batches of plant fertilizer to be produced by the new composting facility at the county's Alpha Ridge landfill in Marriottsville, set to mark its official opening on Monday, Earth Day. Hord, the landfill's operations...
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | April 26, 1993
Garbage composting should be studied as an alternative to burning trash for energy, says Commissioner Julia W. Gouge, resisting an idea being pursued by the other commissioners."
NEWS
By Staff Report | September 3, 1993
Representatives from a Tennessee composting plant will visit Carroll next month to describe their operation, Westminster Mayor W. Benjamin Brown said.Carroll officials had planned a trip this month to Sevier County to see the Bedminster Bioconversion Corp. plant but the trip was canceled Wednesday, he said.The commissioners agreed in early August that they and the town mayors would visit the plant. Some members of the county's Waste-to-Energy Committee also were to attend. Mr. Brown had proposed the trip after he visited the Tennessee plant in July.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2014
I'm feeling a little guilty about starting a compost pile for my kitchen scraps. Don't landfills need organic "trash" sources to counterbalance the inorganic trash? Compost guilt-free. Organic matter in landfills decomposes in an anaerobic (oxygen-poor) situation, which causes it to release methane — a greenhouse gas. Your own compost pile will not. It will enrich your soil and plants and feed a natural web of life without any of the cost — monetary and environmental — of buying a manufactured soil amendment.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2014
I recently purchased several truck loads of composted horse manure for my garden. Why are there so many rocks in it? The rocks didn't come from the horse. Ideally, the company that supplied the manure should be familiar with how it was composted. Big composting productions use large machinery to turn the manure as it composts to keep it properly aerated; sometimes this is done on a macadam or gravel surface and rocks can get mixed in. If the amount is objectionable, voice your dissatisfaction with the supplier.
NEWS
By Amanda Yeager, ayeager@tribune.com | December 24, 2013
Neighbors filled three-quarters of the pews at Friendship Baptist Church in Sykesville last week to grill a local contracting company about its proposal to use farmland in the area as a mulching and wood composting facility. The proposal, from Howard County-based RLO Contractors, requests a conditional use for a composting facility at 1500 Route 32 in Sykesville, about 2.5 miles from the Carroll County line. At the community meeting Dec. 19, neighbors said they were concerned the facility would lower surrounding property values, citing the potential for unpleasant odors and noise generated by composting operations.
NEWS
By Amanda Yeager, ayeager@tribune.com | November 15, 2013
For America Recycles Day, Howard County is moving a step beyond your average blue bin. County Executive Ken Ulman spent Friday morning passing out a new kind of bin to residents of the Clarks Glen neighborhood in Clarksville. Instead of blue, it's green - and rather than collecting bottles and cans, participants fill it up with food scraps. The county is expanding its composting program to Clarks Glen and other neighborhoods in Clarksville and parts of Columbia, where of about 3,800 households, some 1,200 requested the free green bin. Ulman said composting was the next step in moving the county toward its zero-waste goal.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | April 22, 2013
Talk about leading by example -- the Maryland Department of the Environment announced Monday that it would begin collecting food scraps at its Baltimore headquarters for composting. The Earth Day announcement comes on the heels of Howard County launching its own food-scrap processing facility, which I covered here for The Baltimore Sun. MDE will give its 900-plus employees the option to compost their uneaten food at the agency's main offices in Montgomery Park. Officials there say they hope in the effort's inaugural year to divert more than 6 tons of waste that might otherwise have gone to an incinerator or landfill.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2013
Howard Hord considers himself a chef of sorts, but the food he works with is a little past its prime. Using moldy melon rinds, orange peels and other castoff fruit and vegetables from some Howard County kitchens, Hord is "cooking" the first batches of plant fertilizer to be produced by the new composting facility at the county's Alpha Ridge landfill in Marriottsville, set to mark its official opening on Monday, Earth Day. Hord, the landfill's operations...
NEWS
September 23, 1993
Earlier this month, Anne Arundel County stopped the long-standing, senseless practice of filling multi-million dollar, state-of-the-art landfills with harmless yard waste. In turn, the first phase of a new yard waste pick-up and composting program begins today and every resident who rakes a leaf should make sure he or she participates.This program isn't just for environmentalists; it should interest every citizen who cares about his or her tax dollar. Waste disposal represents one of the largest expenditures of county government, and the cost grows every year as state and federal standards for landfill liners, caps and monitoring become more stringent.
NEWS
May 1, 1995
The Baltimore metropolitan area is a step away from a triumph in regional cooperation. That step will be taken tonight if the Anne Arundel County Council approves a three-county agreement to build a yard-waste composting facility in Dorsey. The Baltimore and Howard county councils have already given their blessings to the deal.We urge the Anne Arundel council to do the same. The panel should ignore the local solid waste advisory committee's recommendation that the plan be killed. Although the committee chairman has suggested his group take a neutral stance on the issue, other members have argued the facility is unneeded and should be substituted with one that composts food and yard waste together.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2013
I want to start a compost pile, but I'm worried that kitchen scraps will attract animals from the woods nearby. Any thoughts? Usually kitchen scraps are a small portion of a pile's ingredients. Most kitchen scraps are small pieces, damaged or bruised. They begin decomposing while still in the pail. Kitchen compost pails made with lids that have a filter are very effective is eliminating odor. By the time you dump the pail, scraps are usually beyond being palatable to animals. Throw other organic matter on top. You can also bury the scraps in garden soil.
NEWS
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2012
Should I avoid putting seed heads from flowers or weeds into my compost pile, or will heat from the composting process bake the seeds? I don't want to throw in grass clippings if weed seeds will germinate when the compost is distributed later. Also, do compost bins continue to work in the winter despite short days and cooler temps? "Hot" composting kills many weeds seeds but cannot be relied upon to kill all. If you have really troublesome weeds, don't put those in your compost pile.
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