Advertisement
HomeCollectionsComposition
IN THE NEWS

Composition

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2012
Polly Moser drew inspiration from watching rivers flowing down the mountains during a family hiking trip to California and Nevada. The Burleigh Manor Middle School seventh-grader crafted her first full composition, "The Flow of Water," and entered it in an annual National PTA competition. Polly's work won the top national honor for music composition in May and will be among the works exhibited at the U.S. Department of Education. The contest, Reflections, draws entries from hundreds of thousands of students across the country in the categories of music composition, dance choreography, film production, literature, photography and visual arts.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | May 22, 2014
The two artists exhibiting at the Bernice Kish Gallery at Slayton House seemingly have two very different ways of seeing the world. Jenny Singleton has a mostly abstract approach, while Beatrice Hardy is a realist by comparison. Singleton's acrylic paintings occasionally have quasi-figurative elements, but they remain abstractions. There's no mistaking the brown trunk of an elephant in "After the Parade," but the depiction of its body is so schematic that in a philosophical sense it seems more like an elephant as idea rather than an elephant as image.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2011
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra is all about brand-new this month. Two weeks after premiering David T. Little's Baltimore-inspired "Charm," the BSO is set to premiere another commissioned work - "Chuphshah! Harriet's Drive to Canaan," by James Lee III. Lee's composition - in Biblical Hebrew, "chuphshah" means "freedom" - connects to a theme running through the BSO's season: music to celebrate women who persevered against oppression. "Harriet Tubman's ties to Maryland and heroic efforts to shepherd hundreds out of slavery … inspired me to commission a new work to honor and celebrate her legacy," BSO music director Marin Alsop said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2013
For most of John Ruppert's career, metal sculpture has been a major focus, but he has added photography to his pursuits lately. Some of the results can be sampled and savored in an exhibit at C. Grimaldis Gallery titled "The Iceland Project. " The Massachusetts-born artist, who has a studio in Druid Hill, was one of the first winners of the $25,000 Baker Prize in 2009. He has been a faculty member at the University of Maryland, College Park, since 1987 and chair of its art department for the past 15 years.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | July 28, 2007
George Albert Evans Jr., the former owner and president of Monotype Composition Co. who enjoyed collecting vintage autos, playing the organ and making apple cider, died July 20 of complications from a stroke at Keswick Multi-Care Center. The longtime Towson resident was 82. Mr. Evans was born in Baltimore and raised on Bayonne Avenue. He was a 1944 graduate of Boys' Latin School and attended the University of Baltimore, where he studied law. He enlisted in the Navy in 1945 and served as a printer aboard the aircraft carrier USS Leyte until being honorably discharged in 1946.
NEWS
May 23, 1994
W. Matthew Beachy, 20, son of Bill and Carla Beachy of Ellicott City, conducted the Berklee College of Music Orchestra on May 5, performing his composition, "Andante," for the string orchestra.This was Mr. Beachy's debut as a conductor at the college in Boston.The string quartet also performed another one of his compositions, "Polytonic Reflection."Mr. Beachy is a film scoring and composition major and plays the violin in the orchestra and string quartet. He studied composition with Dr. Elam Sprenkle at Peabody Institute.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | March 13, 2007
Funeral plans are being made for Theophanis "Phanos" Dymiotis, a violinist, composer and adjunct music professor at McDaniel College who died in a Delaware car crash Saturday night. Mr. Dymiotis was returning from Wilmington after a performance with the Delaware Symphony Orchestra when he was killed, officials at the college in Westminster said yesterday. Police said the driver of a northbound car crossed the center line in attempting to pass a tractor-trailer and that the resulting collision killed Mr. Dymiotis and the two occupants of the other car. The 41-year-old Lutherville resident had taught violin at McDaniel since 2004 and was a faculty member in the college's Summer Orchestra Camp.
ENTERTAINMENT
By LAKAIIA WILLIAMS | December 14, 2006
What's the point? -- One word, that's all you have to play with here. Not to mention you only have 60 seconds to write about it. The point is to remove all of the strain and complications that come with deep thought and analysis. Just release all of your inhibitions and write the first thoughts that cross your mind when you see the day's inspiration. What to look for --Have fun with your thoughts and words, that's all. And when you finish writing, compare your short composition with the those of other people who have shared their short-form writing.
NEWS
April 29, 2011
Concert The Chancel Choir of Galilee Lutheran Church will be joined by the 12-piece Galilee Festival Orchestra to present the cantata, "Who Is This King?" as part of the 10:45 a.m. worship services on Sunday, May 1, at 4652 Mountain Road in Pasadena. Music director Joel Borrelli-Boudreau will conduct the ensemble in the works of Lloyd Larson and Joseph M. Martin. The composition begins with the first chapter of St. John's Gospel, then tells the story of Jesus, focusing on the events of Holy Week.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 6, 2003
The people and the professionals have spoken - and awarded Peabody Institute faculty member Christopher Theofanidis the 2003 Masterprize for his orchestral work Rainbow Body. Theofanidis returned to the Baltimore campus yesterday fresh from his victory in this unique international composition competition in London, where he received the prize of 25,000 British pounds (about $42,000). His colleagues in Peabody's composition department, including Peabody director Robert Sirota and British-born composer Nicholas Maw, surprised him with a champagne toast.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2012
Polly Moser drew inspiration from watching rivers flowing down the mountains during a family hiking trip to California and Nevada. The Burleigh Manor Middle School seventh-grader crafted her first full composition, "The Flow of Water," and entered it in an annual National PTA competition. Polly's work won the top national honor for music composition in May and will be among the works exhibited at the U.S. Department of Education. The contest, Reflections, draws entries from hundreds of thousands of students across the country in the categories of music composition, dance choreography, film production, literature, photography and visual arts.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2012
With a giant flag of 15 stars and stripes as a backdrop inside Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, a celebratory concert Sunday night drew a packed house to cap the weekend's commemoration of the War of 1812 bicentennial. As if to underline that there are no hard feelings left over from that conflict between the Americans and the British, members of the Royal Marine Band were positioned outside the hall to entertain arriving concertgoers. Inside, this Star-Spangled Sailabration event featured the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, the United States Navy Band Sea Chanters Chorus and Gov.Martin O'Malley's Celtic band, O'Malley's March.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2011
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra is all about brand-new this month. Two weeks after premiering David T. Little's Baltimore-inspired "Charm," the BSO is set to premiere another commissioned work - "Chuphshah! Harriet's Drive to Canaan," by James Lee III. Lee's composition - in Biblical Hebrew, "chuphshah" means "freedom" - connects to a theme running through the BSO's season: music to celebrate women who persevered against oppression. "Harriet Tubman's ties to Maryland and heroic efforts to shepherd hundreds out of slavery … inspired me to commission a new work to honor and celebrate her legacy," BSO music director Marin Alsop said.
NEWS
April 29, 2011
Concert The Chancel Choir of Galilee Lutheran Church will be joined by the 12-piece Galilee Festival Orchestra to present the cantata, "Who Is This King?" as part of the 10:45 a.m. worship services on Sunday, May 1, at 4652 Mountain Road in Pasadena. Music director Joel Borrelli-Boudreau will conduct the ensemble in the works of Lloyd Larson and Joseph M. Martin. The composition begins with the first chapter of St. John's Gospel, then tells the story of Jesus, focusing on the events of Holy Week.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2010
A Johns Hopkins University astrophysicist whose work helped determine the precise age and composition of the universe will share the $1 million Shaw Prize in astronomy for 2010, the school announced Thursday. Charles Bennett and two colleagues at Princeton University are being honored for their groundbreaking work with the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe, a spacecraft launched in 2001 to study cosmic background radiation, said to be a remnant of the "big bang" that scientists say marked the birth of the universe.
NEWS
May 21, 2009
NICHOLAS MAW, 73 Composer taught at the Peabody British composer Nicholas Maw, who taught music composition at the Peabody Conservatory from 1998 until last year and who was known for his opera based on the novel Sophie's Choice, died Tuesday of heart failure in his Takoma Park home. Mr. Maw's neo-Romantic, post-modernist compositions were praised for their rich textures. His creations "forged a musical language which is truly vibrant and sensuous, and which borrows both from the old and the new," wrote David Cooper in the International Dictionary of Opera.
NEWS
May 21, 2009
NICHOLAS MAW, 73 Composer taught at the Peabody British composer Nicholas Maw, who taught music composition at the Peabody Conservatory from 1998 until last year and who was known for his opera based on the novel Sophie's Choice, died Tuesday of heart failure in his Takoma Park home. Mr. Maw's neo-Romantic, post-modernist compositions were praised for their rich textures. His creations "forged a musical language which is truly vibrant and sensuous, and which borrows both from the old and the new," wrote David Cooper in the International Dictionary of Opera.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | May 22, 2014
The two artists exhibiting at the Bernice Kish Gallery at Slayton House seemingly have two very different ways of seeing the world. Jenny Singleton has a mostly abstract approach, while Beatrice Hardy is a realist by comparison. Singleton's acrylic paintings occasionally have quasi-figurative elements, but they remain abstractions. There's no mistaking the brown trunk of an elephant in "After the Parade," but the depiction of its body is so schematic that in a philosophical sense it seems more like an elephant as idea rather than an elephant as image.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | October 23, 2008
You cannot imagine," Franz Liszt wrote, "how it spoils one to have been a child prodigy." Still, Liszt turned out just fine, enjoying enormous success as a pianist and composer, the kind of dual career that may well be in store for a prodigy born 16 years ago in China. His name is Peng Peng, and he makes his Baltimore debut Saturday in a recital that includes works of Brahms and Debussy, as well as his own music. No stranger to the concert stage - he made his recital debut at 8, his orchestral debut at 10 - Peng Peng can be heard on a just-out Naxos CD playing the heck out of Liszt's Piano Concerto No. 1 with the Nashville Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Leonard Slatkin.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | June 23, 2008
On a shelf in Leonard Slatkin's office at the Kennedy Center sit three of his half-dozen Grammy Awards, alongside photographs of him receiving honors from the two presidents whose terms coincided with his own as music director of the National Symphony Orchestra. That tenure ends this month after 12 eventful seasons. "I think I did a lot," Slatkin says, in between sips of a soda. "Not as much as I would have liked, but a lot." If those accomplishments had to be summed up in a single sentence, it might be: He put the "national" in the National Symphony.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.