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By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | May 4, 1996
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks were mixed yesterday after an unemployment report failed to convince investors that interest rates won't rise enough to threaten corporate profits. Rising computer shares helped the Nasdaq composite index gain.The Dow Jones industrial average fell 20.24 to 5,478.03 as yields on benchmark Treasury bonds reached a one-year high.Shares of Texaco Inc. and Walt Disney Co. led the 30-stock average lower.The Standard & Poor's 500 index fell 1.74 to 641.64, after rising 5.07 points.
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BUSINESS
October 20, 2005
NEW YORK -- Stocks soared yesterday, with the Dow Jones industrials gaining 128 points as a sharp drop in crude oil prices and a reassuring assessment of the economy helped investors overcome their disappointment over Intel Corp.'s earnings and troubling sales forecasts. "There are some signs on the wall here that we may have hit the bottom of this market, and we could be ready to move up," said Chris Johnson, manager of quantitative analysis at Schaeffer's Investment Research in Cincinnati.
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NEWS
By Associated | April 5, 1994
NEW YORK -- Stocks were sharply higher at mid-day, encouraged by a rally in the bond market after days of steep losses.At noon on Wall Street, the Dow Jones industrial average was up 63.63 points at 3,656.98.Volume on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange was 179.79 million shares, compared with 161.14 million at the same time in the previous session.Advancing shares swamped declines about 7 to 1 on the NYSE, with 2,026 up, 286 down and 400 unchanged.The NYSE composite index was up 3.91 at 247.05.
BUSINESS
April 27, 2005
NEW YORK - Nervous investors bid stocks lower yesterday as conflicting economic data prompted them to pull money out of the market ahead of next week's Federal Reserve decision on interest rates. With Wall Street concerned about inflation and the Fed's interest rate policy, the Commerce Department's report showing a surprise jump in new-home sales last month assuaged fears that higher rates would curtail consumers' willingness to buy homes. And oil prices also fell one day after reaching the $56 level, further easing fears that inflation might take hold.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | January 23, 1992
NEW YORK -- Stock prices posted crisp gains in active trading yesterday, as investor confidence returned after two days of losses. With low interest rates continuing as a driving force, the Dow Jones industrial average rose 32.42 points, to 3,255.81.The surge appeared late in the afternoon, aided by computer-programmed buying, said Philip H. Smyth, an analyst with Birinyi Associates, which tracks program trading. Mr. Smyth said the firm picked up heavy program buying from about 3:18 p.m. to near the close, and the impact of the programs added 20.79 points to the Dow.New York Stock Exchange volume was heavy at 228.1 million shares, up from 218.8 million Tuesday.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | January 17, 1992
NEW YORK -- Stock prices pulled back yesterday from their record levels in active trading.The Dow Jones industrial average lost 8.95 points, to close at 3,249.55.Volume on the New York Stock Exchange grew to 336.2 million, from 312.8 million on Wednesday, making it the eighth-most-active day ever.Trading was at its highest since Oct. 16, 1989, when volume totaled 416.3 million shares.Robert C. Walberg, an equity analyst at MMS International, cited the growing stock volume and the softness in the bond market as indications that a good deal of bond money was shifting into equities.
BUSINESS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,New York Bureau | February 4, 1993
NEW YORK -- Buoyed by confidence in the economy and low inflation, investors poured money into stocks yesterday, helping to send the Dow up 45 points, to its strongest showing in six months and its busiest day this year.The flood of money also helped push up two other important indexes -- the S&P 500 and the NASDAQ Combined Composite Index -- to record highs. Spurred by low interest rates, investors grew more and more confident about stocks, said Philip Smyth of Birinyi Associates."There's a lot of cash on the sidelines, and as bond yields decline, that tends to push up the stocks," Mr. Smyth said.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | September 1, 1998
NEW YORK -- Broad market indexes mirrored the Dow Jones industrial average yesterday, as many of them plunged more than 6 percent and hit lows for the year.Among those with major declines, the Russell 2,000 index, a benchmark of small capitalization stocks, slumped 20.59 points, or 5.74 percent, to 337.96, continuing a trend of small-cap losses in recent weeks; the Wilshire 5,000 index plummeted 632.31 points, or 6.71 percent, to 8,785.71; the American Stock Exchange composite index dropped 37.51, or 6.22 percent, to 565.07; the New York Stock Exchange composite index lost 31.52, or 6.15 percent, to 480.60; and the S&P 400 midcap index skidded 18.76, or 6.26 percent, to 281.40.
BUSINESS
By New York Times | December 24, 1991
NEW YORK -- Stock prices leaped yesterday in what traders saw as a continued reaction to Friday's sharp cut in the discount rate and, hard on its heels, a cut in many banks' prime-lending rates.The Dow Jones industrial average surged past the 3,000 barrier for the first time in more than a month to end at 3,022.58, up 88.10 points, or 3 percent.The percentage gain was the best since Aug. 21, when stock prices rebounded after the failed coup in the Soviet Union.Trading was surprisingly heavy for a day that many expected to be a slow pre-Christmas session, with volume on the New York Stock Exchange hitting 229.2 million shares.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | March 19, 1998
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks rose to more records yesterday as rising crude oil prices boosted demand for petroleum producers and drilling companies.Oil industry shares such as Exxon Corp. and Rowan Cos. gained as crude oil had its biggest rise since June 1996, after reaching a 10-year low Tuesday.The Dow Jones industrial average rose 25.41 to a record 8,775.40, overcoming a 43-point loss. The Standard & Poor's 500 index rose 5.07 to 1,085.52, another all-time high, and the Nasdaq composite index rose 8.98 to 1,788.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey | March 20, 2005
A little knowledge can be harmful. Six years ago, my retired neighbor related to me why he had chosen to invest in a number of technology stocks. Each new holding was a breakthrough company, he explained, and his prior success with other tech stocks provided a firm foundation for taking everything to a higher level. This former stockbroker was advised by a son who worked in computers. Together, they constituted an investment team that would greatly enhance his retirement finances, he explained.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | April 29, 2004
NEW YORK - U.S. stocks fell as fighting in Iraq and the prospect of higher interest rates overshadowed better-than-expected corporate profits. The declines in the Dow Jones industrial average and the Nasdaq composite index were the biggest since March 15. The Dow dropped 135.56, or 1.3 percent, to 10,342.60, and the Nasdaq shed 42.99, or 2.1 percent, to 1,989.54. The Standard & Poor's 500 index slid 15.70, or 1.4 percent, to 1,122.41. The benchmark has lost 3.1 percent since hitting a 23-month high Feb. 11. Elsewhere on the broad market, the Russell 2000 index declined 13.70, or 2.3 percent, to 577.06.
NEWS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | January 1, 2003
Stock market losses accelerated in 2002, handing Wall Street a third straight year of losses as corporate scandals, threats of war and a lackluster economy sapped investor confidence. Overall, stocks fell 22 percent for the year, shedding $2.8 trillion in value and erasing $7.4 trillion in investor wealth since the market peak in March 2000, according to Wilshire Associates. "I think everybody is ready to close the books on this one and move on," said James P. Dunigan, chief investment officer at PNC Advisors in Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | July 3, 2002
Communist light Friedrich Engels once complained that capitalists had no social function except "pocketing dividends, tearing off coupons and gambling on the stock exchange," but in the 1990s capitalists weren't even that busy. They skipped the dividends and bond coupons and went straight to the gambling. As the Nasdaq stock index rose from 1,000 to 5,000, dividends became as scarce as savings-account passbooks. Most companies in the tech-swollen Nasdaq composite index paid no dividend, and the habit became infectious.
BUSINESS
April 24, 2001
NEW YORK - Amid fresh reminders that companies are still struggling in a weak economy, investors took profits yesterday, locking in gains after the stock market's two-week rally. Among the big losers were companies that released disappointing earnings and acknowledged future challenges, and companies that were downgraded by brokerages. Analysts had expected a pullback after the Dow industrials and the Nasdaq composite index ended last week with triple-digit advances. "Actually, it is healthy if the market backs and fills, rather than going up like there is no tomorrow," said Dan Ascani, president and research director at Global Market Strategists in Gainesville, Ga. The Dow lost 47.62 to close at 10,532.
NEWS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | April 4, 2001
The Nasdaq composite index - a key gauge of the U.S. high-technology sector that only a year ago was an investor darling - closed yesterday at its lowest point since October 1998, after profit warnings and worries about a standoff with China touched off yet another stock market sell-off. Trading sent the Nasdaq down more than 109 points, or nearly 6.2 percent, to finish the day at 1,673 - a drop of two-thirds from the March 10, 2000, record close of 5,048.62. "Investors are overexposed" to the riskiest stocks, said John P. Hussman, portfolio manager of the Hussman Strategic Growth Fund, a mutual fund based in Ellicott City.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | June 11, 1999
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks fell with bonds yesterday on concern that today's reports on retail sales and wholesale prices will prompt the Federal Reserve to raise interest rates at its meeting at the end of the month.The Dow Jones industrial average recovered 95 points of a 164-point decline in the last half-hour of trading after Fed Chairman Alan Greenspan did not mention interest rates in a commencement speech at Harvard University.The Dow finished down 69.02 to 10,621.27.Computer-related shares such as Microsoft Corp.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 6, 1998
NEW YORK -- Procter & Gamble Co., the only stock in the Dow Jones industrial average to rise on Tuesday, led the market's gainers yesterday in an up-and-down session.P&G climbed $3.8125 to $81.5625 yesterday, after expanding a $1 billion buyback program.The Dow average rose 59.47 points to 8,546.78, rebounding in the last 38 minutes of the session from a 125-point drop but finishing more than 300 points below where it began the week.The Standard & Poor's 500 index rose 9.31 to 1,081.43 and the Nasdaq composite index gained 2.56 to 1,788.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | October 14, 2000
The Nasdaq composite index rocketed to its second-largest-ever percentage gain yesterday after three technology companies posted better-than-expected earnings, but analysts aren't sure whether this is the start of a rally or just a respite from the strong selling the major indexes have seen over the past six weeks. The other major indexes also posted big gains one day after the Dow shed more than 379 points on Thursday - its biggest drop since April - while the Nasdaq dropped to its lowest close of the year.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | October 13, 2000
NEW YORK - U.S. stocks had their biggest decline in six months yesterday as rising tensions in the Middle East and Home Depot Inc.'s warning that profit will miss expectations spooked investors. The Nasdaq composite index dropped to its lowest close this year. Citigroup Inc., J. P. Morgan & Co. and other financial shares fell on concern that rising oil prices will spur faster inflation. Oil stocks such as Texaco Inc. and Unocal Corp. rose with the price of crude. "There's no compelling reason to buy stocks and a lot more reasons to sell - we have Home Depot blowing up" and higher oil prices, said Robert Leshman, who runs New York hedge fund Briar Partners LP. "The lower stocks go, the more fear sets in and people say, `Get me out at any price.
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