Advertisement
HomeCollectionsComposer
IN THE NEWS

Composer

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2012
Betty G. Hocker, a retired Baltimore opera singer and composer who wrote the "Fort McHenry March" at the time of the nation's bicentennial, died Saturday of complications from dementia at Stella Maris Hospice. The longtime Roland Park resident was 101. The daughter of a businessman and a homemaker, Sara Elizabeth "Betty" Gumpper was born into a musical family in Butler, Pa. Her father played the banjo and piano and had a small band, while her mother also played the piano and sang.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2014
Michael Hersch composes music of sobering complexity -- lots of jagged melodic lines, thorny harmonies, quick-shifting rhythms. But even at its densest, his intense work communicates in a way that can make a listener feel privy to Hersch's innermost thoughts. The composer, who studied at the Peabody Institute in the 1990s and has been on the composition faculty there since 2006, is about to reveal even more of himself this week when his first work for the stage premieres at the Brooklyn Academy of Music.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 17, 1993
TACOMA, Wash. -- Leroy Ostransky, a longtime composer, music educator and author of three books on jazz, died Monday at age 75.Mr. Ostransky was a professor emeritus of music and composer-in-residence at the University of Puget Sound.He composed five symphonies and a comic opera, "The Melting of Molly." He also wrote an autobiographical memoir, "Sharkey's Kid."@
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2014
Orchestras these days like to put titles on programs, which usually means a dash of the cute, the trite or the hyperbolic. But the title given to the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's SuperPops offering this weekend strikes just the right note - "Marvin Hamlisch: One Singular Sensation. " The personable, prodigious composer was a singular force who created sensational scores for Broadway and Hollywood. His three Oscars, four Grammys, four Emmys, three Golden Globes, a Tony and Pulitzer Prize affirm that.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | May 1, 1991
Bright Sheng is a composer who loves melody, but his "H'un: In Memoriam 1966-1976," which David Zinman and the Baltimore Symphony will perform tomorrow and Friday, doesn't have a single tune. The piece commemorates the victims of China's cultural revolution, in which Sheng's grandparents were among the hundreds of thousands of educated Chinese who lost their lives. All intellectuals who smacked of Western corruption -- including a 10-year-old piano student like Sheng himself -- were declared "enemies of the people."
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | January 12, 1995
Most black classical composers have to wait until Martin Luther King Jr.'s birthday to hear their music. Indeed, one of Jonathan Holland's pieces will be performed tonight when the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra gives its annual King memorial concert. But the precocious 20-year-old composer has already moved out of the ghetto -- admittedly, one built of good intentions -- that confines most classical compositions by African-Americans to such special occasions.His "Martha's Waltz," which the BSO will perform tonight, has been performed in Carnegie Hall by the Detroit Symphony and will be repeated next season by the BSO on a regular subscription program.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | August 14, 1994
Baltimore composer Vivian Adelberg Rudow has been awarded a Standard Award for music composition from the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers. She has received this competitive honor, available to ASCAP members, every year since 1987."It's a stamp of approval from your colleagues," says Frances Richard, director of ASCAP's symphony and concert department. "A couple hundred awards are given each year to our thousands of members."During the past concert season, Ms. Rudow has had 19 performances of her music around the world.
FEATURES
By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 26, 1998
"That's the hard part right now," says Darin Atwater, composer and pianist. "I find myself in a place where I'm composing a lot differently."Atwater, 27, who is featured as composer and piano soloist on the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's annual "Live, Gifted and Black" free concert wrote the piano concerto he'll be playing as a throwback to the romantic era.It's based on the spirituals "I Want Jesus to Walk Wid Me" and "Steal Away," and the piano part sounds as though Rachmaninoff were improvising over these familiar songs.
FEATURES
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 9, 2006
Like prophets, some composers don't get heard often enough. British-born Nicholas Maw, a longtime Washington resident and faculty member at the Peabody Conservatory, should be a household name here. This composer of uncompromising seriousness, extraordinary imagination and uncommon expressive weight is hardly ever acknowledged locally. That may be changing. Next season, Washington National Opera will present his compelling Sophie's Choice, conducted by Baltimore Symphony Orchestra music director-to-be, Marin Alsop.
FEATURES
By Carleton Jones | September 1, 1991
Baltimore and the rest of America missed out on the great concert tours of those early geniuses of classical music: Mozart, Beethoven, Haydn and Schubert, etc. Trans-Atlantic tours just weren't commonplace in the 18th and early 19th centuries. Then, too, this country wasn't musically mature enough in those days to appreciate the works of the masters.But Charm City has certainly attracted its share of musical greats since then -- tours by composers of lasting masterpieces.Way back in the 1860s Rimsky-Korsakov, the Russian orchestral gold medalist, paid a call on Baltimore and Annapolis, as a naval cadet, years before his fame.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2014
The number of concertos for guitar and orchestra is not long; the list of those heard regularly in concert halls is shorter still. This week, a Baltimore-rooted guitar concerto will enter the repertoire and, given the considerable assets behind it, should have a good chance of becoming one of the more successful works of its kind. Jonathan Leshnoff, a rising figure in the contemporary music world and a Towson University faculty member, is the composer. He has written the concerto for and dedicated it to prominent classical guitarist and longtime Peabody Conservatory faculty member Manuel Barrueco, who will be the soloist for the premiere, backed by the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and music director Marin Alsop.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2013
J. Ernest Green, artistic director for Live Arts Maryland, began the company's season last month with an auspicious opener: "One Singular Sensation: A Celebration of the Music of Marvin Hamlisch. " The performance in late September showcased stellar guest soloists collaborating with the Annapolis Chorale and Youth Chorus and other youth groups at the Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts. It's fitting for Green to showcase the late Broadway and Hollywood composer's favorite works - after all, he worked closely with Hamlisch for 11 years, often conducting with and for him in a relationship that began in 2002 when Green was a cover conductor with the National Symphony Orchestra.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2013
John Williams has won just about everything there is to win in the music industry, including a slew of Grammys, Golden Globes, Emmys and no less than five Academy Awards - his record of 48 Oscar nominations is second only to Walt Disney. If the 81-year-old composer, whose career encompasses the campy mid-'60s vintage TV series "Lost in Space" and last year's sobering, soaring movie "Lincoln," wanted to rest on his comfy stack of laurels, no one would blame him. But Williams remains as busy as ever with film projects, commissions for concert works and conducting gigs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2013
In his typical rhyming style, Muhammad Ali might call it something like "a whopper of an opera. " The legendary boxer, who floated like a butterfly and stung like a bee, has inspired "Approaching Ali," a chamber opera with music by Carroll County native and Baltimore School for the Arts alum D.J. Sparr. The work is based on Davis Miller's 1996 book "The Tao of Muhammad Ali. " Contemporary political figures have ended up in operas, "Nixon in China" by John Adams being the most prominent example.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | May 31, 2013
When the Columbia Orchestra concludes its 35th season on Saturday, June 1, at 7:30 p.m., in the Jim Rouse Theatre at Wilde Lake High School, it will not go out quietly. "I wanted to go out with a bang," said Columbia Orchestra Music Director Jason Love about the ambitious program he has planned. He added that the three main pieces on the program "all deal with struggle and rebirth. " All of that struggle and rebirth warrant considerable orchestral forces, so the Columbia Orchestra will be joined by an additional 15 to 20 players for this performance.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Foe The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2013
Thanks to the tenacity of a director and a talented cast, fans of Cole Porter can get to know the composer's 1937 musical, "You Never Know," currently getting first-rate treatment at Prince George's Little Theatre at the Bowie Playhouse. The legendary lyricist and master tunesmith's farcical comedy is an exciting, charming close to the Little Theatre's 53rd season. Production director Roy Hammond says his love affair with the show dates back 16 years, when he discovered a CD of "You Never Know" in a Hollywood record shop.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 10, 2004
David Raksin, the noted film composer for Forever Amber and The Bad and the Beautiful who turned his hauntingly memorable score for the 1944 film-noir classic Laura into one of the most recorded songs in history, died yesterday of heart failure at his home in Van Nuys, Calif. He was 92. Mr. Raksin was the last surviving major composer from Hollywood's Golden Age and a onetime Communist Party member who reluctantly named names before the House Un-American Activities Committee. In a more than half-century career in Hollywood that began in 1935 when he was hired to assist Charlie Chaplin with the music for Modern Times, Mr. Raksin received Academy Award nominations for his scores for Forever Amber (1947)
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | November 4, 1990
Philip Glass is more difficult to track down than a Washington politician."I think this is Washington," Mr. Glass said with a chuckle in a recent phone conversation from the Days Inn where he was staying in the nation's capital. "If it's Monday, it must be Washington. Believe me, these days I'm never sure."The 53-year-old American composer -- who was born in Baltimore -- is on tour with his Philip Glass Ensemble, performing his score for "Koyaanisqatsi," Godfrey Reggio's 1983 film about ecological balance, at showings of the film.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2013
Allow me to roll the Apple of Discord into the meeting.  David Skinner, whose The Story of Ain't ( reviewed here ) described the godawful hullabaloo over Webster's Third International , has written a preview about the long-awaited Merriam-Webster's New Unabridged Dictionary . In his sampling of the new online edition, her checked out the entry for comprise  and discovered (wait for it) that the whole comprise/compose  distinction insisted on in stylebooks and journalism classes is much more complicated and much less straightforward than you have been led to believe.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2013
In the beginning, the search for a new home was all about studio space for artist Tendai Johnson, an instructor at Montgomery College. When his former work space in a large building in Washington's Chinatown was sold and working in his house in the H Street corridor became impossible, he and his family made the move north to Baltimore. Realtor Marci Yankelov of Century 21 found them a three-story stone Victorian townhouse in Baltimore's Reservoir Hill neighborhood. It was love at first sight.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.