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By Sandra Blakeslee and Sandra Blakeslee,New York Times News Service | June 14, 1993
LAS VEGAS, Nev. -- In what doctors termed the most important discovery for diabetics since insulin, researchers said yesterday that the devastating complications of the disease could be prevented or delayed.They said this is possible when diabetics closely monitor their blood sugar levels with a special meter throughout the day and inject themselves with insulin four to seven times daily to keep their blood sugar at a near-normal level.In current practice, patients do not monitor their blood so closely and give themselves one or two doses of insulin a day, which causes their blood sugar to vary greatly.
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SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
If Len Bias could attend his own Hall of Fame ceremony on Friday , he'd do so as a 50-year-old man. That's a heck of a thing to wrap your head around if, like me, you grew up as an obsessed ACC basketball fan in the 1980s. Lenny has lived as an idea about what could have been for so long, it's strange to think of him as an actual person. Every generation has its touchstones. For my parents, it was the Kennedy assassination. People my age remember watching from their elementary school classrooms as the Challenger exploded and later on, 9/11.
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TOPIC
By Paul Wenske | February 11, 2001
KANSAS CITY, Mo. - A year ago Martha Gershun thought it would be great to ditch her glasses and, like a million other people, have her eyeballs sculpted to improve her vision. Now she's seeing red. "It was a whim. I thought it would be cool," she said. A friend encouraged her. And TV ads implied near-perfect sight. But a year later, Gershun is angry. Her eyes are so dry and painful all the time that she can't read to her daughter at night. "Having refractive eye surgery was probably the worst decision of my life," said the president and chief executive of BizSpace, a local Internet publishing company.
SPORTS
Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Buck Showalter does not believe he's changed. Let's get that out of the way right off. In fact, he's suspicious of anyone applying a sweeping narrative of transformation to his current success as Orioles manager. "I think I'm just perceived different," he said in a hushed moment outside the clubhouse, three days after his team clinched its first American League East title since 1997. "It's funny how that changes. " The Orioles' 2014 postseason - which begins with Game 1 of the American League Division Series on Thursday against the Detroit Tigers - likely represents one of Showalter's last, best chances at managing in his first World Series.
NEWS
January 17, 1995
Sir Alexander Gibson, 68, founder and former music director of the Scottish Opera Company, died Saturday of complications from a heart attack.
NEWS
August 30, 1999
Richard C. Freeman, 72, a U.S. District Court judge who served on the federal bench for 28 years and was known for his direct approach, died Thursday in Atlanta from complications from heart ailments and diabetes.Pub Date: 8/30/99
NEWS
April 11, 1995
George C. Edward Jr, 80, former chief judge of the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals from 1979 to 1983 who authored the 1971 ruling that banned secret wiretapping, died Saturday of complications from Parkinson's disease in Cincinnati. He ruled that wiretapping without court authorization violated Fourth Amendment protections against illegal searches and seizures.Theodore Elenoff, 70, a New York law firm founder and former president of the American Jewish Congress, died Sunday of a heart attack.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 28, 1994
Six months ago, the nation's diabetes experts made a sensational announcement. By following a strict medical regimen, they said, diabetics can measurably slow the onset and maybe even avert the dire complications of the disease.The threat of blindness, kidney failure, heart attack or amputation, they proclaimed, could be greatly reduced or virtually eliminated.Diabetes centers across the nation geared up for an onslaught of patients wanting to begin the new treatment. They hired more staff, put in extra telephone lines, prepared educational materials and ordered the home monitoring devices that would allow diabetics to test their blood sugar from four to 10 times a day.The blood sugar tests are a crucial part of the tight-control regimen that the study, which followed 1,441 patients with Type I diabetes for nine years, found to be clearly beneficial to diabetics.
NEWS
May 5, 1998
Clyde Connel,96, recognized for her use of natural materials in her paintings and sculptures, died Friday in Shreveport, La. She underwent surgery for colon cancer last month.She has been the subject of at least two books. Her work was featured in the show "Different Drummers" at the Hirschhorn Museum of Art at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington.Emily Hartshorne Mudd,99, who established Pennsylvania's first birth control clinic and gained international recognition as one of the founders of the marriage-counseling profession, died Saturday in Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 12, 2005
Two medical institutions are collaborating in a five-year study to see whether intensive patient education and physician training can reduce complications of hypertension and diabetes. The University of Maryland School of Medicine is recruiting 800 people with hypertension, and Bon Secours Baltimore Health System is enrolling 800 diabetics. Doctors will counsel and follow them to see whether greater attention to diet, medication and other factors makes a difference. The study will focus primarily on blacks, who suffer disproportionately from both diseases.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
Starting Wednesday, you can no longer be arrested in Maryland for possessing a small amount of marijuana. But how the rest of that interaction with police plays out might depend on what jurisdiction you're in. Lawmakers did not legalize marijuana, but made possession of less than 10 grams an offense that results in a $100 ticket for a first infraction. That means that thousands of cases each year will no longer lead to a criminal record. In Montgomery County, you can avoid arrest even for an amount far exceeding 10 grams, if police deem your stash to be for personal use only.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck and The Schmuck Stops Here | September 19, 2014
There was a time not so long ago when the NFL seemed like it was coated in Teflon. No matter who did wrong or how badly the incident seemed to damage the credibility of the sport, the NFL would crank up the image machine, put it on spin cycle and emerge with its reputation and runaway revenues intact. Not anymore. The Ray Rice domestic violence scandal, which spun out of control when the infamous inside-elevator video became public 12 days ago, continues to damage the credibility of everyone it touches and still could be the undoing of embattled commissioner Roger Goodell.
NEWS
August 13, 2014
We were saddened to read about Baltimore County Police Officer Joseph Stanley Harden's arrest on robbery and drug possession charges ( "Off-duty officer tries to break into home in search of drugs, police say," Aug. 1). The veteran officer reportedly told investigators he became addicted to Oxycodone after a work-related injury. While there is a general awareness of prescription drug abuse in our society, most people do not understand the complicated problem of chronic pain syndrome that can lead to prescription drug dependence or addiction.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
Baltimore, home to the first received telegraph message (Samuel Morse, 1844, sent from Washington), the first umbrella factory in America (1828), the first Ouija board (1892) and - to note what really matters - the first baseball player to win MVP awards in both leagues (Frank Robinson, 1966) and the first Olympian to win eight gold medals in a single games ( Michael Phelps , 2008). As if that doesn't engender enough civic pride for any municipality, it seems Charm City, according to the Maryland Historical Society, can add another first to its list: birthplace of the American bicycle.
NEWS
July 29, 2014
A recent report that a runaway Sierre Leone Ebola patient had been located but died in the ambulance on the way to the hospital is good news for the wrong reasons. Maybe this incident will help members of the community understand that Ebola is not a gimmick aimed at carrying out "cannibalistic rituals. " As a Nigerian-American who spent most of my adolescence in Nigeria, I am not surprised at the mistrust of health care workers or at the misconceptions surrounding the Ebola virus in Sierra Leone.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2014
Mike Farrell, the national recruiting director for Rivals.com, believes that Maryland has a chance to bring four-star recruit Kai Locksley to College Park in 2015. But Farrell said the negatives might outweigh the positives in terms of the way Terps coach Randy Edsall is trying to build his program and offensive coordinator Mike Locksley, Kai's father, does his job. The younger Locksley recently listed Maryland among the six schools he's considering. That list likely grew by one when Kai Locksley received an offer from Alabama on a visit this week to Tuscaloosa.
NEWS
December 25, 1994
Ross Doud Eckert, 53, an educator who sounded one of the earliest alarms about the risks of contracting Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome through blood transfusions, died Friday of AIDS complications in Pomona, Calif. He was a Claremont McKenna College professor who received blood transfusions to treat hemophilia. His interest in the safety of the blood supply began long before he was found to be infected with the virus that causes AIDS. Mr. Eckert wrote of potential dangers in the blood supply in a 1985 book, "Securing a Safer Blood Supply."
NEWS
March 21, 1999
Doris M. Drury,72, the first woman to head the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, died Tuesday. Ms. Drury, a longtime professor at the University of Denver and Regis University, also was a pioneer in helping women get bank loans.Patrick Heron,79, Britain's foremost abstract painter, died yesterday, the director of London's Tate Gallery said. The Tate Gallery held a retrospective exhibition of Mr. Heron's work last year. He was a principle member of the St. Ives group of artists.Marian Searchinger,81, New York theatrical agent who represented actors Ossie Davis, Ruby Dee and Jane Alexander, died Monday in Santa Barbara, Calif.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | June 6, 2014
The case can be made that there is a lot more riding on California Chrome than a 100-pound jockey and a chance to be mentioned in the same conversation with the greatest thoroughbreds of all time. The case can be made that when Chrome bursts out of the starting gate at Belmont Park on Saturday, he'll be carrying the weight of the horse racing world on his chestnut shoulders. He won't just be chasing history. He won't just be trying to end a 36-year Triple Crown drought, though that's the main headline.
SPORTS
By Glenn Graham, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2014
The sound would loudly and routinely resonate from the Bel Air sideline, a declaration of good fortune for the school's boys lacrosse team: "Yanneee!" While none of the Bobcats had any idea what it meant, they all knew what was coming next: a chest bump of epic proportion. That's how Bel Air coach Scoop Kelly celebrated a big goal, his passion for lacrosse and for his beloved program on full display in a sudden burst of excitement. But the big goals that would have called for Kelly's sideline celebration haven't been the same this season.
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