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BUSINESS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
Baltimore City officials are investigating a complaint filed Wednesday by two minority- and women-owned businesses against health care giant Aetna for not using their services despite a contractual agreement to do so. Thomas B. Corey, chief of Baltimore's Minority & Women's Business Opportunity Office, said he will research why Aetna did not use the subcontractors, CASI Inc. and JUL Enterprise, despite committing to when it applied for the city...
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
Baltimore officials approved Wednesday a payment of nearly $100,000 to the American Civil Liberties Union to settle a longstanding federal lawsuit over protesters' rights in Baltimore. As part of the settlement, city officials agreed to loosen restrictions on protesting. The new rules allow groups of up to 30 people to protest or pass out fliers without obtaining a permit at all city parks and 10 designated locations, including McKeldin Square by the Inner Harbor. City Solicitor George Nilson, a member of the Board of Estimates, which authorized the deal, also said protesters can now obtain instant permits to hold demonstrations.
NEWS
October 14, 2013
Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler's announcement of his selection of a running mate in next year's gubernatorial election - the well-qualified Del. Jolene Ivey of Prince George's County - is being overshadowed by a report over the weekend that he routinely ordered state troopers to violate traffic laws while they were driving him and by predictable knee-jerk parochialism in Baltimore about an all-Washington suburbs ticket. The first issue warrants some concern; the second does not. The Washington Post's John Wagner wrote on Sunday about a series of memos and emails he obtained under the Maryland Public Information Act detailing complaints by members of Mr. Gansler's executive protection detail.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | September 30, 2013
Harford County-based Upper Chesapeake Health System is the subject of a complaint and lawsuit filed by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission on behalf of a former employee who claims she was discriminated against because of a disability and retaliated against when she sought federal relief. The civil suit was filed Friday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore and alleges the non-profit health care company "failed to provide a reasonable accommodation, fired, and later refused to rehire a pulmonary function technologist because of her disability and in retaliation for her requesting an accommodation and complaining about discrimination," according to a news release issued Friday by EEOC's Baltimore office.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2013
An outspoken English professor at the Naval Academy has been removed from the classroom following complaints from midshipmen, academy officials confirmed Monday. The academy would not elaborate on the nature of the complaints about Bruce Fleming, a popular professor who has often been critical of the academy. Academy spokesman Cmdr. John Schofield said it would be inappropriate to discuss the details of the complaints against Fleming, as an internal investigation is ongoing. "Professor Fleming deserves an expectation of privacy and a fundamental presumption of innocence in this matter, as do all midshipmen, staff and faculty at USNA who may be subject to any investigation," Schofield said.
NEWS
September 16, 2013
Over the years there have any number of citizen complaints about police use of excessive force and other misconduct, including some high-profile cases where suspects died while in custody. But too often investigations into such complaints end in a situation where it's the witnesses' word against the officers', leaving neither side feeling that justice has been done. That's why we were intrigued by Baltimore City Del. Frank Conaway Jr.'s proposal last week to require police in Maryland to wear tiny cameras that record all their interactions with the public.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2013
The Baltimore County Ethics Commission said Tuesday it will not file a complaint against a Dundalk councilman who for years did not disclose his outside employment — including a stint at a company that did business with the county schools — saying that he has corrected the omissions. Councilman John Olszewski Sr., a Democrat, filed amended financial disclosure forms dating to 2009 after the omissions were reported by news organizations this year. Assistant County Attorney Susan Dubin, the commission's lawyer, said county law gives a public official 15 days to remedy or "cure" a situation in which an alleged violation of ethics rules has occurred.
NEWS
August 20, 2013
Del. Joseph F. Vallario Jr., the Prince George's County Democrat who chairs the House Judiciary Committee, is the frequent target of accusations that his public role and private interests conflict. That criticism usually boils down to a disagreement with his views on legislation and anger at his willingness to use his power to bottle up bills he doesn't like. But a complaint filed against him with the legislature's ethics committee is different; it centers on discussions about a piece of legislation that became law (in fact, one he voted for)
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2013
Baltimore County officials have ordered a Parkville-area roller-skating rink to cancel an Aug. 16 club-themed event after complaints about crowds of teenagers disturbing residents and businesses as they leave the rink at closing time. This week, the county Department of Permits, Approvals and Inspections sent a letter to Skateland Putty Hill on Belair Road saying the business operated in a way that produces "excessive noise, traffic congestion, vandalism" and other activities creating a public nuisance.
NEWS
August 8, 2013
I always find it amusing how people that buy into less desirable neighborhoods are quick to complain when the thing that made their home less wanted - and cheaper - gets even worse ( "Study finds planned CSX transfer station could have negative impact," Aug. 5). I feel for these people, but CSX was there long before they were. I am a huge railroad fan and stockholder and I believe we have no more room for more lanes on our gridlocked highways. I have been advocating for a viable high-speed rail system that will take you anywhere in the continental U.S. within 24 hours and have made a valid proposal to all of the sources that be. What CSX is doing here is vital to the Port of Baltimore and part of a long overdue enhancement of the local rail infrastructure.
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