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Complacency

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NEWS
February 3, 2014
I read with great interest Samuel Totten's commentary on Congress and the National rifle Association ( "Congress capitulates to the NRA," Jan. 28). While I agree with everything he wrote I still don't understand why our elected officials have to experience a tragedy first-and in order to have some empathy and do something to stem the flow of gun violence. Fortunately neither I nor anyone in my family has witnessed or been involved in a senseless act of gun violence. But that doesn't mean I can't relate to these horrific events.
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NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | October 12, 2014
Last week, a federal judge told us what we already knew. Namely, that police in Ferguson, Mo., violated the rights of protesters demonstrating against the shooting death of Michael Brown. U.S. District Judge Catherine Perry struck down an ad hoc rule under which cops had said people could not stand still while peacefully protesting. Some were told they couldn't stop walking for more than five seconds; others that they had to walk faster. Again: These were not rioters. These were citizens seeking "peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances," as the First Amendment gives them the right to do. So Perry's ruling is welcome, but not particularly surprising.
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NEWS
July 20, 2013
Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is a monster, but that shouldn't restrict investigation into his beliefs that led up to the Boston Marathon bombing. This act of terrorism was abhorrent, but I don't fault Rolling Stone for doing an article on the subject, or for putting the remaining suspect's photo on the cover ("Rolling Stone rocked by criticism for upcoming Tsarnaev cover," July 18). It's time Americans began questioning our blind acceptance of multiculturalism and our policies of admitting refugees without considering the cultures from which they emanate.
NEWS
October 6, 2014
Your editorial on the Ebola virus' recent appearance in Texas perfectly expressed my fears and concerns regarding the outbreak ( "Ebola hits home," Oct. 2). I would add one more point that should be made: When medical officials say Ebola can only be spread via body fluids, they usually cite blood, vomit, urine and diarrhea. However, bodily fluids also include sweat and saliva, both of which are secreted daily in the most mundane ways. I strongly urge people in Dallas, where I was recently a graduate student at Southern Methodist University, to stock up on bleach-based cleansers and to refrain from unnecessarily touching their faces, especially if their hands have been in contact with objects commonly carried around in crowded public spaces, like laptops and cellphones.
NEWS
June 12, 1995
Howard County was victimized by random violence eight days ago. The shooting of two furniture store employees by masked gunmen during a daylight robbery last Sunday riveted the community and inflamed fears. If the reaction wasn't as great as that elicited by the horrific death and carjacking of scientist Pam Basu nearly three years ago, it was nevertheless one of those crimes that felt as if it had been perpetrated on an entire community.What made this act resonate so? Precisely because it was so senseless.
SPORTS
June 26, 2006
While Dr. Corinne Sweeney, the director of the University of Pennsylvania's New Bolton Center, said Kentucky Derby winner Barbaro had another good day yesterday, she also cautioned about complacency. Barbaro is at the George D. Widener Hospital for Large Animals in Kennett Square, Pa., recovering from a broken rear right leg he suffered in the Preakness. Sweeney said that while every good day puts the horse further from infection and the possibility of laminitis, "it is a misconception to think the potential for complications has been eliminated."
BUSINESS
By Mark Stevens | December 17, 1990
Ask business owners to name their worst enemies and they'll tell you that taxes, competition and rising costs top the list. Although no one can deny that all three are major hurdles, by laying blame solely on these external forces, entrepreneurs fail to identify and to deal with a dangerous enemy that lurks within. It is the enemy "complacency."In its most common form, complacency is a state of mind thatviews a company's battle for survival, and its struggle to maintain profitability, as a thing of the past.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Suzanne Loudermilk and Jay Apperson contributed to this article | September 17, 1998
Four years ago, Republican F. Vernon Boozer breezed unopposed to a new four-year state Senate term -- his popularity never questioned, even as a moderate in a conservative district.But Tuesday night, after 17 years in the upper chamber, the 63-year-old Boozer lost his central Baltimore County seat to a political opponent who had never run for public office.What happened? Some say nearly everything.Low turnout, complacency by Boozer, redistricting, gun control, abortion, needle exchanges and even Boozer's talent for dealing with General Assembly Democrats converged to boost Dr. Andrew Harris, an obstetric anesthesiologist at Johns Hopkins Hospital, to a 54 percent victory, observers say."
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN REPORTER | November 29, 2006
Navy has had its way with Army throughout the five-year tenure of coach Paul Johnson, whose Midshipmen have beaten the Black Knights by an average of 31 points in four previous meetings. The Mids, who are pursuing an unprecedented fourth consecutive Commander in Chief's Trophy on Saturday at Lincoln Financial Field, could achieve a five-game winning streak against Army for only the third time during the 107-game rivalry. Judging by the enthusiasm it has shown in practice this week, Navy (8-3)
NEWS
March 19, 1993
Confronted with a perennial state budget crisis, the House Appropriations Committee and its chairman, Del. Howard P. Rawlings, don't have enough to do. So the Rawlings panel recommended withholding $4.8 million in state aid from Baltimore schools unless the city adopts recommendations made in a nine-month-old consultant's study. The House of Delegates upheld the committee Wednesday night in a vote on amendments to Gov. William Donald Schaefer's proposed $12.7 billion budget.Superintendent Walter G. Amprey is understandably upset.
NEWS
July 28, 2014
We take the Baltimore County Police Department at its word that its officers were just trying to give some helpful tips to a pair of Dundalk activists about the rules of decorum at County Council work sessions and not trying to intimidate them into silence about their opposition to County Executive Kevin Kamenetz's proposed redevelopment of a government building in the community. Even if the meeting earlier this month between three officers and a pair of community activists really was intended as a "polite and friendly way to discuss concerns about protocols," as the police department's spokeswoman put it, the whole business still stinks, which Chief Jim Johnson correctly concluded after reviewing the incident.
NEWS
February 3, 2014
I read with great interest Samuel Totten's commentary on Congress and the National rifle Association ( "Congress capitulates to the NRA," Jan. 28). While I agree with everything he wrote I still don't understand why our elected officials have to experience a tragedy first-and in order to have some empathy and do something to stem the flow of gun violence. Fortunately neither I nor anyone in my family has witnessed or been involved in a senseless act of gun violence. But that doesn't mean I can't relate to these horrific events.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2013
Who says a restaurant can't offer both picturesque views and a satisfying dining experience? Actually, everybody says that. But, come on. Surely it's not always the case that a restaurant that provides views as beautiful and uplifting as the Severn Inn's - views of the Naval Academy Bridge, the Maryland State House and the Severn River itself - will turn out to be as much of a letdown as the Severn Inn was. I sensed what...
NEWS
July 20, 2013
Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is a monster, but that shouldn't restrict investigation into his beliefs that led up to the Boston Marathon bombing. This act of terrorism was abhorrent, but I don't fault Rolling Stone for doing an article on the subject, or for putting the remaining suspect's photo on the cover ("Rolling Stone rocked by criticism for upcoming Tsarnaev cover," July 18). It's time Americans began questioning our blind acceptance of multiculturalism and our policies of admitting refugees without considering the cultures from which they emanate.
NEWS
By Herma Percy | May 5, 2013
The arrest of three friends of the surviving suspect in the Boston Marathon bombing reminds us of the consequences of withholding information from investigators, lying or being an accessory after the fact for a friend or loved one. In other words, if the authorities are correct, "snitching" could have saved these three young men from facing criminal charges, international notoriety, and a future scarred by the cover up of their friend - a suspected terrorist....
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | October 28, 2011
The theory that players suffer a drop in production after signing big contracts apparently doesn't apply to Sam Koch. Through six games, the Ravens punter is enjoying career highs in both punting average (47.3 yards) and net average (41.4) after agreeing in February to a five-year deal believed to be in the range of almost $12 million. Koch has plenty of reasons to perform well, and one of those is the absence of guaranteed contracts in the NFL. “It is a little bit of security, but then again, that contract really doesn't mean much because if you don't go out there and perform week in and week out, that contract could be voided within a day,” Koch said Thursday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | December 7, 2003
Lawyers, Judges and Journalists: The Corrupt and the Corruptors, by Robert B. Surrick. 1stBooks. 356 pages. $19.95 softbound. Surrick, a Pennsylvania lawyer for more than 40 years, has spent more than 20 of them attacking judicial and lawyerly abuses of power and ethics. An activist on the state's Judicial Inquiry and Review Board, an occasional and unsuccessful candidate for appellate judgeships, he has long been honored by good government forces and vilified by political power exploiters and the plaintiff's trial bar, which has immense and lucrative influence in the state -- and nation.
NEWS
August 14, 1996
THE TOWN'S MAYOR has just been arrested and charged with perjury, insurance fraud and theft. The city manager has been asked by the local council to resign for costing the community money by missing grant-application deadlines. Crisfield should be in turmoil. Instead, folks in that isolated crabbing town on the lower Eastern Shore are blase about the whole thing.Yet Mayor Donald W. Gerald has been charged with serious crimes. And City Manager Harry T. Phoebus may have been inexcusably remiss in applying for state grants.
NEWS
July 22, 2011
Advocates for marriage equality in Maryland have taken several important steps toward reversing their narrow defeat in this year's General Assembly session, but none were nearly so important as the boost they got today from Gov. Martin O'Malley, who said he will sponsor the legislation in next year's session and assign his chief legislative aide with making sure it succeeds. Given that the legislation passed the state Senate was likely just a vote or two shy of passage in the House of Delegates, the odds are extremely good that the governor's highly public support — and the not inconsiderable talents of his top lobbyist, Joseph C. Bryce — will be enough to put the bill over the top. The success of gay marriage legislation in New York this summer looms large over all the strategizing among advocates in Annapolis.
NEWS
July 23, 2010
The NASA authorization bill that passed the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation last week is a brilliant compromise and could result in NASA moving forward to a future with sound earth and space science, an aeronautics program that will increase air travel safety and efficiency, and a human exploration effort that has a chance of allowing humans to venture beyond low earth orbit. Beginning the development of a heavy lift rocket in FY2011 gets NASA moving in the right direction and goes a long way to preserving high-tech jobs.
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