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Competitive Bidding

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NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Sun Staff Writer | November 10, 1994
Local school bus drivers and contractors care more about Carroll County students than could a large company from elsewhere, said a steady stream of parents and people affiliated with the local bus companies.About 50 people -- drivers, contractors and their supporters -- attended the Board of Education's meeting yesterday to urge the board not to use a competitive bidding system for school transportation.But the recommendation to put bus routes out to bid, made by an independent firm that audited how efficiently the Carroll school system runs transportation and other functions, is just a suggestion, school officials said.
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BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2013
The Cordish Cos., the Baltimore-based real estate developer that owns and operates Maryland Live Casino, announced Thursday that it has been selected to develop portions of an airport-industrial complex in Alabama. Cordish and its partner JMG Realty, of Mobile, Ala., were chosen by the Mobile Airport Authority to take control of about 215 acres of the Brookley Aeroplex, a 1,700-acre industrial site and home to the Mobile Downtown Airport, Cordish said in a statement. The companies are hammering out an exclusive negotiating agreement with the airport authority, the statement said.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | February 1, 1998
A group of Anne Arundel County school bus contractors has failed to persuade a judge to block the start of competitive bidding for regular bus routes, but Friday's courthouse confrontation may be the start of a war over transporting children to school.Lawyers for the drivers vowed to return to court Feb. 12 for a second try at an injunction, this to block the school board from awarding the contracts after it opens the bids.The board could award the contracts for the coming school year as early as Feb. 18.Around the state, school transportation systems are in tremendous flux, as local school boards look to hold down costs, provide more service and meet new safety and other regulations, said Winship Wheatley III, Anne Arundel's transportation director.
NEWS
February 25, 2013
The home medical equipment industry has been growing ever since it became clear that getting patients out of the hospital sooner would reduce overall health care costs. Home medical equipment companies provide the products that disabled, elderly and infirm people need in order to live independently. They deliver the equipment, train patients and caregivers in its use and repair or replace it when needed. But in Maryland, a conflagration of regulatory events threatens to dismantle the industry.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | May 7, 2001
Don't mock this president. He got the better of Congress on spending and taxes, same as Bill used to do. The big auction houses know too much about competitive bidding to want to have to do it themselves. The chairman of the Johns Hopkins trustees is running for mayor of New York and might give the Bloomberg School of Public Health to CUNY. The economy is beating expectations. We in it are not.
NEWS
June 7, 2011
John E. Kyle's recent letter ("Angelos and other critics late to weigh in on State Center," June 1) is yet another example of a proponent of the $1.5 billion State Center project refusing to explain how and why the state's competitive bidding laws were ignored. Time and again, State Center advocates refuse to address the critical issues. Instead, they divert attention by attacking one of the messengers. Contrary to critics' aspersions, Peter Angelos has done much to better our city and state.
NEWS
September 27, 1996
WE OFFER two words of caution to Howard County officials who have awarded a handful of no-bid contracts for road projects: Daniel Henson.The county's Department of Public Works has awarded eight contracts worth a combined $1.5 million since 1991 -- three this year -- without using a competitive bidding process. Six of those awards have gone to the Rouse Co. for work on its own projects. County officials justify the shortcut by saying it is quick and inexpensive, and has allowed the county to share costs of the work with Columbia-based Rouse and two other companies that received no-bid contracts.
NEWS
October 3, 2006
Baltimore school officials insist that their extensive use of emergency contracts, without competitive bidding, is justified and has largely been in response to legitimate requirements. But for a system that recently eliminated a huge deficit and is seeking to regain trust and confidence, the practice is troubling. An examination by The Sun's Sara Neufeld found that during the last six months, the city school system has not used competitive bidding in approving 21 contracts worth more than $19 million.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | May 22, 1992
TC For the first time in its history, Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. has been ordered by state regulators to create a competitive bidding process for selecting a company to supply electricity to Maryland customers.The company that sparked the case, Cogen Technologies Inc. of Houston, called the decision a disappointment and said it expects BG&E to "stack the deck" against non-utility power producers.The ruling issued yesterday by the Public Service Commission stems from a case in which Cogen was trying to force BG&E to agree to buy electricity from a power station Cogen proposed to build in South Baltimore.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Staff Writer | June 16, 1993
The Hayden administration has backed away from a proposal to award operation of two county-run mental health centers to two area hospitals.That proposal, along with one shifting pay grades and job classifications, was scheduled to come before the County Council this month. The proposed personnel change has some employees worried that future pay raises may be blocked if their jobs are downgraded.The withdrawal of both measures is temporary, according to County Executive Roger B. Hayden and his administrative officer, Merreen E. Kelly.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2012
Baltimore officials awarded $1.8 million in contracts for the city's lucrative towing business on Wednesday, ending a practice that had allowed a small circle of companies to bypass the city's competitive bidding system for decades. City Councilman Robert W. Curran said the contracts approved Wednesday by the Board of Estimates mean some towing companies "will be losing significant percentages of their tows and conducting tows at reduced rates," a benefit for the city and its taxpayers.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2012
The agency that oversees the state's health plan for those uninsured because of preexisting conditions, paid a vendor nearly $367,000 for information technology services without proving that the contract was chosen through a competitive bidding process, a legislative audit has found. The audit also said The Maryland Health Insurance Plan did not perform routine reviews to make sure the insurer that manages the plan for the state, CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield, was complying with its contract.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2012
Baltimore officials are seeking to award contracts for the city's lucrative towing business, closing a loophole that allowed a small circle of companies to dominate the $4 million-a-year industry while bypassing the city's competitive bidding system. For decades, the city has funneled its towing contracts to 10 companies known as "medallion" towers, which were not required to demonstrate that they were best equipped to provide the service or charged the lowest rates. Nor were companies held to the city's standards for minority particpation.
NEWS
June 7, 2011
John E. Kyle's recent letter ("Angelos and other critics late to weigh in on State Center," June 1) is yet another example of a proponent of the $1.5 billion State Center project refusing to explain how and why the state's competitive bidding laws were ignored. Time and again, State Center advocates refuse to address the critical issues. Instead, they divert attention by attacking one of the messengers. Contrary to critics' aspersions, Peter Angelos has done much to better our city and state.
NEWS
May 31, 2011
As government officials obligated to represent the public's interests and follow state laws, it is troublesome to think that Michael Gaines and Christopher Patusky are so far off the mark regarding State Center in their recent letter ("Setting the Record Straight on State Center," May 16, 2011). Contrary to setting the record straight in this $1.5-billion gamble, Messrs. Gaines and Patusky distort matters by attempting to justify the circumvention of competitive bidding laws by asserting the plan's claimed benefits.
NEWS
February 10, 2011
I wonder if Baltimore County Superintendent Joe A. Hairston thinks of the countless hours, sleepless nights and often thousands of dollars spent by families with children with mental and/or learning disabilities when undergoing the extensive individualized education program (IEP) process to obtain services to educate their special needs children ( "Baltimore County schools did not seek competitive bids for software contract," Feb. 9). Families are expected to put out multiple "bids" for even the most basic of services.
BUSINESS
By Robert A. Rosenblatt and Robert A. Rosenblatt,Los Angeles Times | March 4, 1992
WASHINGTON -- In a frantic effort to clean up failed thrifts in the West, the Resolution Trust Corp. was overcharged as much as $4 million as accountants billed the government for 16-hour days and for flying families in for weekend visits, a Senate committee was told yesterday.Most of the bills were submitted by Financial Management Task Force, a small Denver concern that was hired without competitive bidding for the $20 million special emergency accounting project, witnesses told the Governmental Affairs Committee.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | January 24, 1998
An audit of the Baltimore County school district's facilities department has found that officials did not properly plan major construction projects, sidestepped competitive bidding on some contracts and failed to justify cost overruns.The county auditor's 18-month review also detailed widespread problems in recordkeeping on school construction, while confirming problems disclosed in May 1996 by the district's internal review.The audit moved a step beyond the internal review by calling for a variety of reforms and policies aimed at forcing the facilities department to better justify its decisions and comply with Maryland bidding regulations.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2011
The Baltimore County school system has paid a Georgia software company hand-selected by Superintendent Joe A. Hairston at least $4 million over the past decade without seeking competitive offers from other companies. In doing so, procurement experts say, the school system did not follow commonly accepted purchasing practices that would have required the system to fully explore whether similar products were on the market. Concern about the lack of transparency in the school system's business practices has been growing among county lawmakers for the past year, since they began questioning the ethics of another deal that Hairston struck with a colleague.
NEWS
November 23, 2010
I am writing in response to articles published in The Sun last week about contracts presented to the Board of Public Works by the Department of Juvenile Services ( "Still waiting for Superman," Nov. 21). I would like to clarify that the department's violation of procurement regulation was the failure to present the contracts to the Board of Public Works prior to issuance, not that there was no competitive bid process. Maryland procurement regulations permit the state's child-serving agencies to procure both residential and non-residential services for children and youth without a competitive bid process for good reason.
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