Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCompetitive Advantage
IN THE NEWS

Competitive Advantage

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Rachel Barnard and Rachel Barnard,MORNINGSTAR.COM | October 6, 2002
You may already own some Nasdaq stocks. Companies such as Microsoft, Amazon.com and Cisco Systems. You may even own shares of Qubes (the Nasdaq 100 index). But what about owning shares of the Nasdaq stock market itself? Buying into an operation such as Nasdaq may sound confusing, rather like buying a stake in the department of motor vehicles rather than simply investing in a car. The DMV doesn't make or sell cars, but you can't drive on the roads without paying it a visit and ponying up fees for a driver's license and plates for your car. That gives it a type of monopoly, permitting it to thrive without competition.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
March 3, 2013
It's fine — for amateurs Chris Dufresne Los Angeles Times The most sleep-inducing word on the PGA Tour this year is "bifurcation," although the issue over whether the tour should break from USGA and R&A is hotter than Dubai. Golf's ruling lords have proposed banning "the anchoring" of a club (putter) to a player's body. The PGA Tour has suggested it won't go along. In a perfect world, this ban should have been initiated 40 years ago or at least before belly putting players won three of last five majors.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2013
Moving to expand its online sale presence, Acme Paper & Supply Co., Inc., a Savage-based distributor of packaging, office and janatorial products, has acquired ReStockIt.com, a supplier of office supplies and electronics. Financial terms were not disclosed. ReStockIt.com, based in Davie, Fla., reported revenue of $25.6 million in 2011. It has 30 full-time employees. Acme was founded in Baltimore in 1946 by the Attman family and moved to Howard County in 1979. ReStockIt.com was founded in 2004.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2013
Moving to expand its online sale presence, Acme Paper & Supply Co., Inc., a Savage-based distributor of packaging, office and janatorial products, has acquired ReStockIt.com, a supplier of office supplies and electronics. Financial terms were not disclosed. ReStockIt.com, based in Davie, Fla., reported revenue of $25.6 million in 2011. It has 30 full-time employees. Acme was founded in Baltimore in 1946 by the Attman family and moved to Howard County in 1979. ReStockIt.com was founded in 2004.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff writer | September 15, 1991
A bill that may have given an edge to Harford companies seeking county government construction contracts was withdrawn by its sponsor Tuesday after local businesses said it would do more harm than good.The bill, proposed by Councilman Robert S. Wagner, R-District E, would have reduced the prices bid by Harford-based companies by 1 percenton bids of $1 million or more. The reduction was intended to give Harford-based businesses a competitive advantage on landing county government construction contracts.
BUSINESS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | January 3, 1991
The state's third annual "state of the economy" report has found slowdowns in housing, retail sales and construction, and extremely slow growth in employment and personal income.But on the whole, says J. Randall Evans, Maryland's secretary of economic and employment development, the state's economy is out-performing the national averages, and Evans paints an optimistic picture for Maryland as the new year opens."It's clear the country is in a recession," Evans said yesterday, "and areas of Maryland's economy are in recession."
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | June 9, 2001
Armed with three-ring binders, color graphs and pages of analysis, Maryland aviation officials launched a campaign last winter to stop the proposed merger of US Airways and UAL Corp.'s United Airlines. The $11.6 billion cash and debt deal would leave Baltimore-Washington International Airport users with fewer choices, less competition and higher airfares, state transportation officials charged. But with U.S. Transportation Secretary Norman Y. Mineta and a growing number of antitrust experts predicting that the merger will never win Justice Department approval, BWI officials may have little to celebrate in victory.
NEWS
By Garland L. Thompson | October 18, 1990
.TC TECHNICAL TRAINING is a subject many Americans consider arcane and not applicable to the things that matter in their daily routines. Some 2,500 technical trainers from all over have converged on Baltimore for a conference taking the opposite view. Consider a few statistics, and it's clear they have a point:* Seventy-five percent of all workers will need retraining, mainly to deal with new technology, by the year 2000.* Sixty-five percent of all jobs, whatever the industry, will require training beyond high school.
NEWS
By Adam Seth Litwin | September 5, 2011
Economic experts say it all the time: Amid the fierce competition of the new global marketplace, job one for America is getting the most out of our human capital. Yet even as this asset is deemed of high importance to individual companies and the overall economy, managers have become increasingly reluctant to invest in employee education and training. Labor Day's arrival can serve to remind employers that such investments are critical to an economy whose competitive advantage stems not from how inexpensive our labor is relative to other countries', but rather how capable it is of doing complex work with cutting-edge technology.
SPORTS
March 3, 2013
It's fine — for amateurs Chris Dufresne Los Angeles Times The most sleep-inducing word on the PGA Tour this year is "bifurcation," although the issue over whether the tour should break from USGA and R&A is hotter than Dubai. Golf's ruling lords have proposed banning "the anchoring" of a club (putter) to a player's body. The PGA Tour has suggested it won't go along. In a perfect world, this ban should have been initiated 40 years ago or at least before belly putting players won three of last five majors.
NEWS
By Kristen Campbell McGuire | June 13, 2012
Baltimore is brainy. And that's a good thing - nerds come out ahead. A study released recently by the Brookings Institution ranks metro areas by number of college graduates, and the Baltimore-Towson area comes in 14th, with 35 percent of adults holding college degrees. A New York Times story about the study describes a "growing divide among American cities, in which a small number of metro areas vacuum up a large number of college graduates" and notes that areas with more college graduates have longer life expectancies, higher incomes and fewer single-parent families, which result in higher regional incomes - and tax bases.
NEWS
By Adam Seth Litwin | September 5, 2011
Economic experts say it all the time: Amid the fierce competition of the new global marketplace, job one for America is getting the most out of our human capital. Yet even as this asset is deemed of high importance to individual companies and the overall economy, managers have become increasingly reluctant to invest in employee education and training. Labor Day's arrival can serve to remind employers that such investments are critical to an economy whose competitive advantage stems not from how inexpensive our labor is relative to other countries', but rather how capable it is of doing complex work with cutting-edge technology.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | August 19, 2007
In the Middle Ages moats were deep water-filled trenches that encircled castles to protect kings. The wider, the better. In 2007 moats are the competitive advantages that protect dominant companies and their shareholders. The wider, the better. The goal in trying to pick companies with wide moats is to give investors the security of knowing that a firm isn't likely to see its products or services overtaken by rivals.
SPORTS
By CHILDS WALKER and CHILDS WALKER,SUN REPORTER | December 13, 2005
Many at home with cheating The din produced by Indianapolis Colts fans on Nov. 28 grew so loud that Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger couldn't bark signals to the center crouching just before him. It was so loud that, according to some commentators, it couldn't have been human. After the Colts won, 26-7, several media figures accused the team of pumping artificial noise into the RCA Dome during Steelers possessions. The practice would be against league rules (the Washington Redskins drew a $20,000 fine in 2000 for blasting cheerleader noise)
SPORTS
By THOMAS BONK and THOMAS BONK,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 8, 2005
At least he will have more time to follow college football now, mainly the Oregon Ducks in his hometown of Eugene, or Stanford, where he went to school and earned a degree in economics 10 years ago. What Casey Martin is leaving out of his life is playing the pro golf tour, which is really all he ever wanted to do, withered leg and all, through drawn-out legal battles, a faceoff with golf's establishment, unwanted appearances in the court of public opinion...
BUSINESS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | June 23, 2005
WASHINGTON - When airlines undergoing bankruptcy reorganization continue flying, as United Airlines and US Airways are, they don't inflict unfair competition on other carriers, a federal investigator told Congress yesterday. JayEtta Z. Hecker, of the Government Accountability Office, told the House aviation subcommittee that investigators "found no clear evidence that, historically, airlines in bankruptcy have financially harmed competing airlines." Since the industry was deregulated in 1978, all but a handful of the 160 airlines that filed for bankruptcy disappeared, she said.
SPORTS
By THOMAS BONK and THOMAS BONK,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 8, 2005
At least he will have more time to follow college football now, mainly the Oregon Ducks in his hometown of Eugene, or Stanford, where he went to school and earned a degree in economics 10 years ago. What Casey Martin is leaving out of his life is playing the pro golf tour, which is really all he ever wanted to do, withered leg and all, through drawn-out legal battles, a faceoff with golf's establishment, unwanted appearances in the court of public opinion...
NEWS
By Neal R. Peirce | May 3, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Consigned to extinction by the Republican Congress, the Congressional Office of Technology Assessment in 1995 sang a troublesome swan song. We'd soon be deserting cities, migrating to calm rural places, it predicted.And why? Computers and modems would free us from offices, let us work anywhere. So why not bow to the inevitable and just spread a thin, sprawling layer of homes and settlements across the countryside?But now comes the Silicon Valley consulting firm of Collaborative Economics, with a radically different tune for the times.
BUSINESS
By Mark A. Sellers and Mark A. Sellers,MORNINGSTAR.COM | September 28, 2003
Groups of investors have different motivations and time horizons, which affect stock prices. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder; there's no such thing as a single "fair value" for a company. It depends on who's doing the valuing. This can present opportunities for long-term investors. How can you determine when one of these opportunities is present - that is, how do you recognize the fat pitches? Here are some thought processes I follow. 1. Develop a logical strategy. Many people think the key to success is to outsmart the market.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | November 7, 2002
The fragile balance of power in the telecommunications industry may have tilted a bit more toward the powerful regional Bell phone companies after Tuesday's national elections. Legislation that would help local phone giants such as Verizon Communications Corp. gain in areas such as broadband Internet service has been blocked by the Democratic-led Senate. And the chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, Michael K. Powell, has been restrained from pushing an aggressive deregulatory agenda that might favor the Bells because of the party split in Congress.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.