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By Mike Giuliano | March 27, 2012
The nine young adult performers who participated in the Howard County Arts Council's Rising Star competition all deserve to be considered winners, but only one of them went home with the $5,000 first prize. It was awarded to Samantha McEwen at the 15th annual Celebration of the Arts in Howard County March 24 in the Peter and Elizabeth Horowitz Visual and Performing Arts Center at Howard Community College. The 500 audience members acknowledged all nine performances with enthusiastic applause and also filled out ballots that were tabulated at the end of the event.
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FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | July 26, 1993
Alban Gerhardt of Germany beat out 41 young cellists from all over the world to win the first University of Maryland International Leonard Rose Cello Competition Saturday night with a performance of the Dvorak Cello Concerto at the Kennedy Center. Gerhardt, 24, wins a cash prize of $20,000 and several engagements, including a New York recital Nov. 13 in Lincoln Center's Alice Tully Hall.The cello competition joins the William Kapell Piano Competition and the Marian Anderson Vocal Competition as the three prestigious music contests, which are given in conjunction with workshops and recitals given by well-known performers and teachers, sponsored by the University of Maryland at College Park.
NEWS
By Jeff Blum | February 4, 1999
A LANDMARK federal telecommunications law passed in 1996 promised many benefits for consumers, including more companies competing for their business.But the promises of that law have not been fulfilled as the road to competition has been blocked by the Baby Bells, those regional phone companies formed in the breakup of AT&T's Bell System.As a result, Marylanders must still place virtually all their local calls through one company, Bell Atlantic Corp., which has 95 percent of the business market and nearly all of the residential market for local phone service, according to Maryland's Office of People's Counsel.
SPORTS
By Michael Reeb | October 15, 1991
"No respect for your elders," Robert Yara said to Doug Mock after Mock beat Yara to the finish of Saturday's Quacker Quick Quint at Friends School by 37 seconds.All kidding aside, his elders are the reason Mock, a 25-year-old senior at Salisbury State College, made the trek from the Eastern Shore for the second annual 5-miler at Friends School."I've raced a couple times in Delaware," said Mock, who is doing his student teaching this semester, "but I don't think there's any point in going to a race even if there's prize money if my times are a minute or two slower."
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 22, 1999
THERE HAS been an accident on the international space station. The astronauts are trapped and running out of oxygen.With only eight weeks to plan and execute a rescue mission, could you design, program and build a robot to save them?West Columbians Walt Destler, 14, his brother, Nathan, 10, and their teammates accepted the challenge in this imaginary scenario. Walt's team, called "One Armed Bandit," brought home two trophies in the FIRST LEGO League Challenge, held in New Britain, Conn., this month.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing writer | November 26, 1991
For music aficionados, no sword is as double-edged as the international performance competitions that occur with increasing frequency these days.The Van Cliburn Piano Competition, the Tchaikovsky, the Rubinstein, the Chopin -- everyone bemoans them. Dehumanizing marathons that reward stamina, not artistry, critics say. The technically assured, "play-it-safe" types win, while the genuine individualist losesout because stodgy old judges are offended by truly original playing.Yet few things titillate the music world more than a dazzling pianistic Olympiad, which is exactly what events like the Cliburn and the Tchaikovsky have become.
NEWS
November 16, 1994
It may seem like an issue that was long ago decided in favor of competition and against monopoly pricing. But London Fog wants government approval to set retail prices of its raincoats and deny its wares to retailers who try to sell them at a discount. The apparel concern, whose only U.S. manufacturing plant is in Baltimore, says this is necessary to protect the premium-quality image of London Fog outerwear.London Fog's competitors, including foreign coatmakers, are free to set retail prices for their products in this country.
NEWS
By La Quinta Dixon and La Quinta Dixon,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | July 21, 1999
For the second straight year, Marylanders have won the highest number of medals in the NAACP's national scholastic competition.Ten Maryland high school students received honors in New York last week at the 22nd annual Afro-Academic, Cultural, Technological and Scientific Olympics (ACT-SO), competing against about 850 teen-agers in 12 categories, including the sciences, arts, math, entrepreneurship and film.Three gold medalists are from Maryland: Osato Dixon of Carver Center for the Arts and Technology in Baltimore, for filmmaking; Karl Kuhn of Montgomery County's Watkins Mill High School, for music composition; and Patricia Edmonds of Woodlawn Senior High School, for the computer science competition.
NEWS
July 29, 2007
Everyday scenes of Havre de Grace will be the subject of the plein air paintings created by artists selected to compete in the second annual Havre de Grace Plein Air Painting Competition from Wednesday through Saturday. The competition is sponsored by Soroptimist International of Havre de Grace. En plein air is a French expression meaning "in the open air," used to describe painting in an outside environment rather than in a studio. Artists were selected to compete by juror Jacqueline Baldini of Niagara Falls, Ontario, director and founder of the International Plein Air Painting Organization.
NEWS
February 1, 2002
Metzler's Garden Center, 10342 Owen Brown Road, Columbia, will hold its first Edible Art Competition from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. tomorrow. Contestants from local schools will create edible art with a floral theme. Each school will have its own exhibition area, and parents, friends and others can vote for their favorite entries. The winning school will receive a prize from Metzler's. Judges will select works for first, second and third prizes. Information: 410-997-8133.
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