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By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2011
There's a method to the maki madness. One past champion eats two sushi rolls at a time with quick sips of water in between. Last year's champ builds up an appetite by taking a long swim and bike ride before arriving at the competition. For others who have not developed a method — or a strong stomach — for the Maki Madness competition at RA Sushi, the restaurant has several garbage pails on hand. Just in case. In its third season, the brackets-style sushi-roll eating contest — based on the NCAA basketball championships — has grown in popularity and regularly attracts competitive eaters from around the region.
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By Karen Nitkin and For The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2014
Sydney Miller, a 15-year-old sophomore at Broadneck High School in Annapolis, lost more than 30 pounds after switching to a vegan diet and giving up all processed foods last year. She also helped her dad, Todd Miller, lose weight. "I eat completely clean," she says. "Adults come up to me and ask me how I do it. " Sydney, who is hoping to be a nutritionist, is sharing her interest in eating well through a multimedia project she created for BeeQuest, a national competition that asks high school students the question: "What's Nutrition Mean to You?"
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NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | May 29, 2012
In my previous column, I argued that American citizen-consumers seem far more likely to complain about government failures than about similar problems arising in the free market. Waste, fraud, inefficiency and other frustrations resulting from government action are considered endemic, yet similar patterns of failure in the private sector are discounted if not overlooked. Responding either by email to me directly or via letter to the editor, several readers protested that a key distinction I failed to acknowledge is that government is a monopoly that permits citizens no alternative, whereas pluralistic, competitive markets allow consumers to take their business elsewhere.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg and For The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
The Howard County Library System will hold its seventh annual Choose Civility symposium "The Ball's in Your Court: Can Civility and Sports Co-Exist?" from 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 9, at the Miller branch in Ellicott City. Korva Coleman of National Public Radio will moderate a panel discussion exploring teamwork, leadership, role models, sportsmanship and competition in kindergarten through 12th grade. Joe Ehrmann, a former Baltimore Colts defensive lineman who is now a sports educator with Coach for America, a minister and the author of "InSideOut Coaching: How Sports Can Transform Lives," will be the featured speaker.
NEWS
June 10, 2013
I work for a mid-size firm Baltimore, and our health insurance costs will rise only modestly in 2013. However, in talking to friends at local companies, their health insurers are raising rates exorbitantly in anticipation of the state health exchanges that will be established next year. To give the devil his due, former President Richard Nixon talked about a national health care plan, Mitt Romney implemented one in Massachusetts in 2006, and President Barack Obama has been instrumental in getting a plan started nationwide for 2014.
NEWS
By Will FespermanThe Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2014
Thirty artists from across the U.S. and Ireland are competing for a $3,000 prize this week in an Annapolis open-air painting contest. Organized by the Maryland Federation of Art, an arts nonprofit in Annapolis, the competition celebrates "plein air" painting - the creation of outdoor scenes and landscapes. The competition, now in its 12th year, includes several events that are open to the public, including the Paint Annapolis Exhibition Public reception at Circle Gallery and a "Dueling Brushes" two-hour "quick draw" event open to artists of all ages and abilities.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly | March 19, 2013
One of the main competitions - really, one of the only competitions - in Orioles spring training this year is for the fifth starter's role. A whole lot of names have been thrown into the mix: Jake Arrieta, Zach Britton, Steve Johnson, Brian Matusz, Jair Jurrjens, Tommy Hunter and T.J. McFarland. Hunter, in particular (and Matusz, potentially) is earmarked for the bullpen. McFarland, a Rule 5 pick, may have to be offered back to the Cleveland Indians because he doesn't look like he'll make the rotation.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | December 15, 2013
On the reality TV program "Shark Tank," investors bicker, maneuver and generally steal the thunder from aspiring entrepreneurs who come before them to pitch ideas. Unlike the Tin Man who clanks and clatters as he nervously asks the Wizard of Oz for a heart, brazen contestants work at stirring the aptly named sharks into a feeding frenzy of investment offers in order to clinch the most lucrative deal. At Howard Community College, the Center for Entrepreneurial and Business Excellence was founded a decade ago - six years before "Shark Tank" debuted in 2009.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun and By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2012
The Baltimore City and Baltimore County school districts have been named among 61 finalists nationwide to vie for millions in federal grants under the new Race to the Top program, the U.S. Dept. of Education announced Monday. The two school systems were among 372 from across the country to apply for the new district-level competition, which could award the city and county between $30 and $40 million to invest in innovative programs to address their achievement gaps. "These finalists are setting the curve for the rest of the country with innovative plans to drive education reform in the classroom," U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan said in a statement send by the department.
EXPLORE
By Brian Conlinbconlin@patuxent.com | May 25, 2011
Lansdowne High School's state champion team traveled far and came close in the recent National Personal Finance Challenge in St. Louis. The local squad returned home May 18 after finishing sixth out of 13 teams in the second annual event, which was presented by the Missouri Council on Economic Education, with funding from Wells Fargo Advisers. At the end of the five-hour competition, Mike Martin, who coached the team with Greg Karpes, said an official informed him afterward that the point differential between first and seventh was “tiny.” “We can hold our own with anybody,” said Martin of Lansdowne students Mike Delair, Mandela Jones, Jordan Thomas and Evan Richards.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
Elizabeth M. Solter, an accomplished equestrian and teacher who had been a member of the U.S. Equestrian Team and went on to a successful career as a rider, died Sept. 12 of breast cancer at Amberly Farms, her farm in Berlin, Worcester County. She was 47. "I saw Elizabeth come up through the ranks and hit the heights, and it was a joy to watch. She just had natural ability," said Tommy Serio, one of the top riders and trainers in the country, who was a longtime friend and competitor.
SPORTS
By Paul Pierre-Louis and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
COLLEGE PARK - There were cheerleaders on either side of the Maryland women's soccer team as it jogged onto Ludwig Field before its game Friday night. Capping the scene was a Big Ten banner that was displayed as the players made their entrance. The Terrapins' hosted No. 25 Rutgers in the university's first Big Ten conference home game. With the men's soccer team playing its first conference game at Michigan earlier that evening, the women's team received the spotlight on the historic night.
NEWS
By Peter Morici | September 3, 2014
Friday, the Labor Department is expected to report that the economy added 230,000 jobs in August. The pace has picked up a bit but is still far less than needed to reemploy all the prime aged workers displaced in the wake of the financial crisis. The jobless rate is down to 6.1 percent but that stat is deceptive. For example, one in six adult males between the ages of 25 and 54 is not working. Many don't show up in the unemployment count because they are not actively looking for a job. They spend their days cluttering park benches or watching ESPN because they are too discouraged to look for work or lack the incentive to make an effort.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
A team of Johns Hopkins University undergraduates was named a finalist in a competition to build a real-life version of the tricorder, a fictional device used on the TV show "Star Trek" to diagnose health ailments. The stakes are high — the Hopkins team could win a portion of a $10 million prize sponsored by wireless communications company Qualcomm and end up with a device that could be sold for medical use. But the competition for the Qualcomm Tricorder Xprize is fierce. The Hopkins team is the only undergraduate group, and it faces nine other teams from around the world, including from India, Taiwan and the United Kingdom.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2014
I love "Breaking Bad," and even I didn't think it would win as big as it did Monday night at the 66th Primetime Emmy Awards. Best drama, best actor (Bryan Cranston), best supporting actor (Aaron Paul), best supporting actress (Anna Gunn) and best writing (Moira Walley-Beckett). Did show runner Vince Gilligan & Co. ever go out on a high. And it is all the more impressive when you consider the incredible level of competition for each of those awards. I picked it as best drama, and I picked Gunn and Paul as best supporting actress and actor.
NEWS
By Dallas Dance | August 26, 2014
Tomorrow is not just the first day of the 2014-2015 school year for 110,000 students in Baltimore County Public Schools. It's also the launch of initiatives to create opportunity-rich environments in every school, in every classroom and for every student. It has never been more important to educate students to high levels for their own individual success as well as the success of our county and nation. However, decades of data tell us that far too often being a student of color or a student from a low-income family correlates to lower academic achievement.
EXPLORE
May 31, 2011
The Maryland Council on Economic Education last week honored Cromwell Valley Elementary School fifth-graders Abhinav Khushalani and Andy Yakim as national first and third place winners, respectively, in the fourth- and fifth-grade division of the Stock Market Game's InvestWrite Contest. At a ceremony at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in Timonium, both students received mini-notebook computers, and their teacher, Flo Falatko, won a $750 professional development scholarship and a $250 gift card.
EXPLORE
February 17, 2012
Century High School, located at 355 Ronsdale Road, Sykesville, will host its ninth annual Century Idol show and competition on Saturday, Feb. 25, beginning at 7 p.m. in the school auditorium. The event is a talent show, where five finalists will compete for the title of Century Idol. The competitors are Julia Szekely, a 10th-grader at the school; Tay Jacobe, also a 10th-grader; Ashley Barr, an 11th-grader; Maggie Neal, a ninth-grader; and 12th-grader Christina Antolick. Admission is $9, or $8 with a canned food donation.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
The competition to open the season as Morgan State's starting quarterback has come down to two men. With Seth Higgins still recuperating from offseason shoulder surgery, redshirt senior Robert Council and redshirt junior Moses Skillon split reps with the first offense during a scrimmage at Hughes Stadium Wednesday. First-year coach Lee Hull confirmed that Council and Skillon are battling for the right to start at Eastern Michigan on Aug. 30. “It's down to Moses and Robert,” said Hull, a former wide receivers coach at Maryland.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | August 19, 2014
There was a time when such a scene exceeded the imagination of a new generation of Orioles fans. On the fourth floor of the B&O Warehouse, Orioles employees stuffed envelopes with playoff ticket order forms and dispatched them to season-ticket holders Tuesday in the hope and anticipation of an Orange-and-Black October. This is not a unique phenomenon. It's going on all over the major leagues, and the same scene played out the past two years in the Warehouse, but there seems to be general agreement that it all feels more real this year.
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