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NEWS
January 19, 2010
A January 18 Sun article on salaries of higher education officials reported that I had refused to accept a deferred compensation payment (" State university presidents' pay in middle of the pack"). This is not correct. The Sun based this on information released this week by the Chronicle of Higher Education that shows that I received a deferred compensation payment in 2008 but not in 2009. However, this change actually stems from the University System of Maryland Board of Regents' conversion of my deferred compensation to a multi-year performance payment.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
Several months ago, Baltimore Inspector General Robert H. Pearre Jr. quietly decided to dedicate an agent solely to investigating workers' compensation and disability fraud within Baltimore's police and fire departments — and this week investigators announced charges against a former city officer accused of bilking taxpayers out of more than $30,000. It's an effort Pearre plans to continue in future months, city officials said. Pearre has negotiated a deal with the police and fire departments to fund a full-time position in his office digging into what he calls "uniform fraud" — a move he expects to "bear significant fruit," he wrote in a recent report.
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BUSINESS
March 5, 2010
The chief executive of Baltimore money manager T. Rowe Price Group received about $4.7 million in compensation last year, a 17 percent drop from 2008. James A.C. Kennedy's $350,000 salary remained the same, but the value of his option awards and nonequity incentive plan compensation slumped. That comes on top of a decrease in 2008, a terrible year for financial companies. Kennedy's 2007 compensation was $7.9 million. Brian C. Rogers, chairman and chief investment officer, took a 29 percent cut last year, to $4.7 million.
NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | August 19, 2014
Two recent major developments may revolutionize major college sports, potentially to the benefit of long-exploited college athletes. It's about time. On August 7 the National Collegiate Athletic Association decreed that the five major conferences - the University of Maryland's former and new conferences, the ACC and the Big Ten; plus the Big 12, PAC-12 and the SEC - shall have greater autonomy to develop policies that specifically meet their needs. Experts believe the five conferences' 65 member universities could, among other changes, begin to pay annual stipends for student-athletes and cover their tuition and other scholastic costs after their eligibility has expired.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2012
Total compensation for Under Amour CEO Kevin A. Plank fell 14 percent last year after the company failed to significantly improve its operating efficiency, the company said in a Securities and Exchange Commission filing. Plank's compensation, including base salary and company performance incentives, totaled $1.13 million in 2011, down from $1.32 million in 2010, a proxy statement filed Friday showed. Plank, Under Armour's chairman, president and largest stockholder, made Forbes magazine's list of the world's billionaires earlier this month with a net worth of $1.1 billion.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2012
As free agency opens Saturday morning, there is one change that will decide how teams receive compensation draft picks for free agents who sign with other teams. Teams have had a five-day window that began Monday -- the day after the end of the World Series -- to negotiate exclusively with their free agents. That window ends at the end of tonight, thus officially opening the free-agent season. In the past, free agents were rated by Elias, which determined what kind of picks a team would receive if it lost a free agent after offering him arbitration.
NEWS
February 23, 2010
I take issue with Professor Larry Gibson's letter to the editor, written in response to your article "Ex-dean of UMB law is audit target" (Feb. 20). As a former student of Professor Gibson's, I have great respect for his contributions to the school of law and the city of Baltimore. However I believe he willfully attempts to steer the focus away from important questions involving Karen Rothenberg's compensation. In doing so, he provides irresponsible justifications for compensating individuals who ultimately provide a public service to our state.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2012
Sinclair Broadcast Group's chief executive, David D. Smith, earned $4.2 million last year, a 16 percent increase that included more than $2 million in stock option awards, the Hunt Valley-based broadcaster reported. Compensation for Smith, who is also the company's president, included a $1 million base salary and $1 million in cash bonuses, the company reported Monday to the Securities and Exchange Commission. The company said 94 percent of shareholders approved the company's executive compensation package last year in Sinclair's first-ever "say on pay" vote.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2012
The Gallaudet University diversity officer who was suspended from her job after signing a petition to put Maryland's same-sex marriage law to referendum said she wants her post back and is owed compensation for the emotional toll caused by the firestorm. "This has been a tremendously horrific time for myself and my family," Angela McCaskill said at a news conference Tuesday outside the Maryland State House. "The university has allowed this issue to escalate out of control. They have attempted to intimidate me. They have tarnished my reputation.
NEWS
February 2, 2010
Robert Embry's article that addressed barriers to attracting quality teachers ("Maryland must remove barriers to attracting quality teachers," Feb. 1) raises several fundamental issues. First, as one who supervised teachers for 22 of my 32 years in public school education, I would posit that individuals entering the profession should be referred to as "prospective" teachers. Second, given the compensation disparity between the public and private sectors, the best and brightest are not attracted to teaching.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
Residents of East 26th Street in Charles Village are seeking compensation from the city and CSX Transportation for damages suffered when they were displaced from their homes by a landslide in April that sent half their block crumbling onto railroad tracks below. The residents have hired teams of attorneys at three law firms, who have asked the city and railroad operator to meet them at the negotiating table or see them in court. They contend they should have been at the negotiating table when the city and CSX hashed out an agreement to split the cost of fixing the street.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | July 17, 2014
That's real nice about Martin O'Malley raising close to $800,000 from various supporters who apparently think he could go from Maryland governor to president of the United States some day, maybe even in 2016 if Hillary Clinton decides to become a Re/Max agent. With Maryland in his rear-view mirror, O'Malley continues to travel about the country, helping various Democratic incumbents who face battles in the upcoming midterm elections. That's So'Malley - selfless and always looking out for those who struggle.
NEWS
Patrick Maynard and The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
Today, the Sun newsroom is rolling out the most recent update to a data set we have been posting for years: Maryland public worker compensations . Readers can use the interface here to learn about the state payroll. Use a popular-search link at the top or explore on your own. Clicking an underlined column heading will sort by that column, and clicking a row of results will provide details. Detailed analysis from Sun reporters is coming in the days ahead, but to start, here are a few pull-outs we found interesting: -- The largest three compensations are University of Maryland coaches, as in past years*.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2014
Chesapeake Employers' Insurance Co. has some long-standing policyholders — 96 years, in one case. That happens when you date to the infancy of your industry. The Towson-based workers' compensation insurer — a century old this year — was created by Maryland legislators as they instituted a system to help injured employees and compensate the families of those who die in workplace accidents. States across the country were doing the same in rapid succession. Chesapeake Employers was called the State Accident Fund then, and it was a government agency.
NEWS
By Caroline Little | May 21, 2014
Every day, city hall reporters at local newspapers distill hours of city council meetings into cogent stories that inform readers about how their elected officials are spending their tax dollars. Sports reporters document the successes of the high school team. Investigative reporters dig through thousands of pages of documents to expose government corruption, waste or ineffectiveness. This journalism plays a vital role in local communities and in our nation's democracy. But it also costs money: Newspapers continue to invest more than $5 billion a year in journalism - far more than any other medium in the United States.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2014
Jos. A. Bank Clothiers Inc. said its CEO and president, R. Neal Black, earned $2.92 million last year, up slightly from 2012. Black's compensation included $791,275 in salary and $2 million in stock awards. Bank's top executive also earned another $126,000 through a change in pension value and other compensation, the men's apparel retailer reported Friday in an amendment to its annual report. Black earned $2.9 million in 2012. In March, the Hampstead-based store chain agreed to a $1.8 billion merger with larger rival Men's Wearhouse.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2012
Darnerien McCants, a former wide receiver for the Washington Redskins, can pursue workers' compensation benefits in Maryland for injuries he sustained during games and practices in other states, Maryland's highest court ruled Thursday. The unanimous decision comes on the heels of a related ruling Wednesday in a case involving another former Redskins player. The Court of Appeals allowed Tom Tupa, who had been a punter for the Virginia-based team, to obtain workers' compensation benefits for a career-ending injury suffered in 2005 during warm-ups before a home game at FedEx Field in Landover.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2012
Legg Mason shareholders voted to approve a $4.9 million pay package for Chairman and CEO Mark R. Fetting at the Baltimore-based investment firm's annual meeting Tuesday morning. Fetting's compensation package was $1 million less than the package approved at last year's meeting. Compensation for four other executives was approved in amounts ranging from $1.8 million to $3.5 million. The shareholder's approval of the compensation packages was advisory and nonbinding. Shareholder guidance group Glass, Lewis & Co. had recommended that stockholders support the compensation packages, which it said are similar to Legg Mason's peers.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | April 29, 2014
The CEO of a Hunt Valley-based real estate investment trust, which has a portfolio of skilled nursing and assisted living facilities across the U.S., was awarded $7.3 million in compensation for 2013, a year that the firm's returns placed it among the top performing REITs in the country. Omega Healthcare Investors, Inc. CEO C. Taylor Pickett received a $700,000 base salary and a $1.05 million cash bonus in 2013. Chief Operating Office Daniel J. Booth was awarded $3.92 million in compensation for the year, while Chief Financial Officer Robert O. Stephenson received $3.03 million, according to a proxy statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission Tuesday.
NEWS
By Ronald R. Peterson | April 11, 2014
As we at The Johns Hopkins Hospital enter day three of a labor strike, we want to assure our community that we are continuing to provide uninterrupted services to our patients, and we want to restate our priorities of caring about our patients, our community and our employees. We highly value our employees represented by labor union 1199SEIU United Healthcare Workers East. Each one is part of our team and vital to the world-class care we provide. We want to thank the employees who have come to work, and we want to assure our union-represented colleagues who have been out that we will welcome them back.
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