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Compassionate Conservatism

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By Jay Hancock | February 21, 1999
FOR SOME Republicans, being conservative means having the nagging suspicion that someone, somewhere, is being kind to his fellow humans.Texas Gov. George W. Bush recently noted that conservatism can share the bus with compassion. You'd have thought the pope had allowed that hellfire has some good points. The right seems to think conservatism is bogus unless it uncorks the Bollinger over corporate layoffs, fenced-off neighborhoods, income inequality and other side effects of comfy selfishness.
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NEWS
By Edward Goldberg | May 19, 2005
FIVE YEARS AGO, George W. Bush barnstormed America preaching his sermon of compassionate conservatism. Like most sermons, this homily was tucked away and forgotten. However, maybe it's time to resurrect compassionate conservatism - not as a guidebook for domestic policy but as a philosophy to help guide America in its relations with Russia. For Russia is America's enigma. A defeated but growing power, gaining dominance in a world where energy reserves are synonymous with power. A country that touches on nearly every important geopolitical area in the world.
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NEWS
By Edward Goldberg | May 19, 2005
FIVE YEARS AGO, George W. Bush barnstormed America preaching his sermon of compassionate conservatism. Like most sermons, this homily was tucked away and forgotten. However, maybe it's time to resurrect compassionate conservatism - not as a guidebook for domestic policy but as a philosophy to help guide America in its relations with Russia. For Russia is America's enigma. A defeated but growing power, gaining dominance in a world where energy reserves are synonymous with power. A country that touches on nearly every important geopolitical area in the world.
NEWS
April 30, 2003
`Thought police' right to be upset with Santorum I suppose I am one of the "politically correct thought police" Gregory Kane feels is targeting Sen. Rick Santorum merely because he "stubbornly clings to the view that homosexuality is a sin" ("Privacy issue is at the center of Sen. Santorum comments," April 26). We all have our own definition of sin. I happen to believe that voting for Republicans is a sin, but I don't think that people should go to jail for it. And that's what's wrong with Mr. Santorum's views -- he doesn't merely think that gay sex is sinful or that, as a matter of constitutional law, the state has the right to pass laws outlawing certain private sexual behaviors, even if such laws are misguided.
NEWS
By Paul Delaney | July 4, 1999
A DECADE ago, right-wing New York Times columnists William Safire and Abe Rosenthal proclaimed themselves "bleeding-heart conservatives," a cynical take on bleeding-heart liberals. They said they were tough on crime and supported tax cuts but cared about the poor.Now comes along GOP presidential front-runner and Texas Gov. George W. Bush, who has taken that old saw and dressed it up with a new name: "compassionate conservatism."The evolution leaves matters as befuddled as ever. The aim is to soften the harsh image the conservatives have managed to convey, particularly to minorities and women, through words and deeds.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 15, 1999
With Texas Gov. George W. Bush just miles away at an East Baltimore community center, President Clinton waded into the 2000 presidential campaign for the first time yesterday, mocking the GOP front-runner's trademark "compassionate conservatism" while challenging his own party to think bigger in its quest to retain the White House.Clinton keynoted the centrist Democratic Leadership Council's "national conversation" at the Baltimore Convention Center, basking in the accolades and gratitude of an organization he helped raise to national prominence.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | December 6, 2002
WASHINGTON -- A former Bush administration aide has apologized for committing a Washington sin: lapsing into candor in the presence of a reporter. Candor is what comes out when you tell the truth without spin or embellishment. Too much of it can get you into trouble in the world of politics. John J. DiIulio Jr. resigned in August 2001 after about eight months as head of the White House Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives, aimed at giving federal money to religious charities.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 3, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Vice President Al Gore sketched the broad outlines of his presidential candidacy yesterday and challenged the sincerity of potential Republican rival Gov. George W. Bush's claim to be a compassionate conservative.Gore argued that "America needs something better than compassionate conservatism" and accused Republicans like Bush of trying to mimic efforts by "new Democrats" such as President Clinton and himself to move their party toward the center.Gore offered as an alternative "a new practical idealism for the 21st century" that would curb suburban sprawl, protect personal privacy, put more and better-trained teachers into classrooms, promote international trade and strengthen families.
NEWS
By William Saletan | June 21, 1999
EVERYTHING you need to know about Texas Gov. George W. Bush you learned in kindergarten.Launching his presidential campaign in Iowa recently, Mr. Bush outlined a threefold agenda: to impose "bad consequences for bad behavior" and "love our neighbor as we want to be loved ourselves"; to help churches and charities "to nurture, to mentor, to comfort" people in need; and to insist that "every child must be educated."A less daring platform can scarcely be imagined. Yet the media lauded Mr. Bush's speech for its boldness, citing the "contrasts" he drew with President Clinton while "appealing to a different kind of audience from the one that had elected his father" and "distinguishing himself from the rest of the crowded Republican field."
NEWS
By Tom Teepen | October 13, 1999
DISMISSED as a yawner of foregone conclusions, the Republican presidential primary grind has suddenly mutated into a lively scrap over the proper nature and future course of the party.George W. Bush is still the inevitable nominee, but in recent comments distancing himself from some of the GOP's more throwback quarters and constituencies, he has stirred the party's hard right to anxiety and likely to action.Expect a scramble on the religious/cultural/political right to settle on a paladin -- probably Steve Forbes: he can afford it -- to harry Mr. Bush from here on over his ideological apostasies.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | December 6, 2002
WASHINGTON -- A former Bush administration aide has apologized for committing a Washington sin: lapsing into candor in the presence of a reporter. Candor is what comes out when you tell the truth without spin or embellishment. Too much of it can get you into trouble in the world of politics. John J. DiIulio Jr. resigned in August 2001 after about eight months as head of the White House Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives, aimed at giving federal money to religious charities.
TOPIC
By Ivan Penn | February 4, 2001
ROANOKE, Va. -- About a week ago, a school board member, a juvenile probation officer and a parent approached me after a Sunday morning worship service in this southwestern Virginia town, troubled by the truancy of a 13-year-old girl. She had gone to school just three times in the previous two weeks. The teen was facing expulsion, and the school board member was ready to "pull the plug." That meant she would be kicked out of school, and because she had a couple of assault charges on her record, she also was looking at incarceration in a boot camp.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 30, 2001
WASHINGTON - President Bush took his first step yesterday toward giving religious organizations and private charities access to billions of dollars in federal funds, an outreach effort designed to facilitate services for needy Americans. The initiative could become a pivotal test of how far the nation's laws mandating separation of church and state can stretch. "Compassion is the work of a nation, not just a government," the president said as he signed two executive orders to implement his proposal.
TOPIC
By Sam Tanenhaus | October 8, 2000
NO MOVEMENT LASTS forever, but how do we know when the end has come? Consider the case of the neoconservatives, the network of liberal and leftist intellectuals who were disillusioned by the convulsions of the 1960s - or "mugged by reality," in the famous expression - and drifted steadily rightward, emerging in the 1980s as an informal brain trust for the Reagan administration. The tension between liberal sentiments and conservative analysis gave the neoconservative movement its distinctive flavor.
NEWS
August 13, 2000
Zoning laws remain a critical aspect of land conservation Tom Horton's recent column appropriately discussed how increased land conservation through easement and land purchases is changing land protection and noted some of the flaws of zoning ("Land preservation ideas evolve," Aug. 4). But two further points must be made. First, while an increasingly useful tool, direct land conservation cannot replace land use planning and zoning. In the 1990s we annually converted nearly 10 times as much open land to sprawl as we annually saved through conservation efforts.
FEATURES
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2000
PHILADELPHIA - Ellen Sauerbrey was tardy for breakfast with the Maryland delegation of the National Republican Convention yesterday morning, later than planned, that is. And if that doesn't seem like news, well, there's a lot to be learned about modern-day political conventions. This convention, this city, has all the spontaneity of a Catholic wedding. As for planning, the Persian Gulf War had nothing on this event, where everyone is choreographed like a line of Rockettes who have supplemented years of double-shift training with hyper-hypnosis.
NEWS
August 13, 2000
Zoning laws remain a critical aspect of land conservation Tom Horton's recent column appropriately discussed how increased land conservation through easement and land purchases is changing land protection and noted some of the flaws of zoning ("Land preservation ideas evolve," Aug. 4). But two further points must be made. First, while an increasingly useful tool, direct land conservation cannot replace land use planning and zoning. In the 1990s we annually converted nearly 10 times as much open land to sprawl as we annually saved through conservation efforts.
FEATURES
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2000
PHILADELPHIA - Ellen Sauerbrey was tardy for breakfast with the Maryland delegation of the National Republican Convention yesterday morning, later than planned, that is. And if that doesn't seem like news, well, there's a lot to be learned about modern-day political conventions. This convention, this city, has all the spontaneity of a Catholic wedding. As for planning, the Persian Gulf War had nothing on this event, where everyone is choreographed like a line of Rockettes who have supplemented years of double-shift training with hyper-hypnosis.
NEWS
By Tom Teepen | October 13, 1999
DISMISSED as a yawner of foregone conclusions, the Republican presidential primary grind has suddenly mutated into a lively scrap over the proper nature and future course of the party.George W. Bush is still the inevitable nominee, but in recent comments distancing himself from some of the GOP's more throwback quarters and constituencies, he has stirred the party's hard right to anxiety and likely to action.Expect a scramble on the religious/cultural/political right to settle on a paladin -- probably Steve Forbes: he can afford it -- to harry Mr. Bush from here on over his ideological apostasies.
NEWS
By Barry Rascovar | July 18, 1999
POLITICS in much of the Western world has been redefined by a movement called the "third way." In the United States, Germany, Britain, France, Italy and now Israel, candidates espousing an approach that is just to the right of center have swept into office.In Baltimore this past week, the group that started this movement, the Democratic Leadership Council, cheered its biggest success story, President Clinton.The group had much to celebrate -- and much to worry about.The DLC concluded in the conservative Reagan years of the 1980s that hard-line liberals had wandered too far left of the vast majority of Americans.
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