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Compassion

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NEWS
June 16, 2014
I was outraged to read that our mayor, congressman and senator all found reasons to oppose the Obama administration's proposal to turn the former Social Security Administration building downtown into a shelter for homeless immigrant children ( "Rawlings-Blake voices concern over immigrant shelter," June 10). Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake was quoted as having "serious concerns" about placing the children at the Metro West complex. Well, I have serious concerns too - about our elected officials' lack of compassion.
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NEWS
By Mary Johnson and For The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
Continuing to emerge as a major entertainment presence in Annapolis, Compass Rose Theater has opened its fourth season with Lorraine Hansberry's powerful 1959 drama, "A Raisin in the Sun," visiting issues of justice and equal opportunity that continue to resonate with audiences today. Groundbreaking 55 years ago as the first Broadway play written by a black female author, "A Raisin in the Sun" not only changed American theater, but offered hope for a future when the dreams of African-American families would no longer be deferred.
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NEWS
January 18, 2012
I enjoy reading the various editorials and commentaries published in The Sun, but I was especially moved by Dee Wright's op-ed describing the life and death of Mary Hines ("Where was Mary Hines' 'village'?" Jan. 16). Ms. Hines, an 84-year-old retired educator who was destitute and in need, was murdered. I'm left with the same questions as Ms. Wright: What did Ms. Hines' so-called friends and family do to help in her final years of heartache and pain? Not much. Talk is cheap!
NEWS
September 9, 2014
Janay Rice's public message today about the Ravens' decision to cut her husband, running back Ray Rice, and the NFL's decision to ban him for life after a video was published showing him knocking her unconscious is likely to have precisely the opposite of the effect she desired, drawing more attention to what is for her, a painful family matter. In a post on her Instagram account, Ms. Rice condemned the media and the public for causing her family anguish and forcing them to relive "a moment we regret every day. " She added: "If your intentions were to hurt us, embarrass us, make us feel alone, take all happiness away, you've succeeded on so many levels.
NEWS
June 15, 2011
At first glance, the EPA's proposed ban on consumers using fast-acting rat poisons seems like good news for rats, mice, dogs, cats, children and the countless other beings who suffer and die after ingesting rodent poisons every year ("Backyard debate: To bait or not to bait," June 11). But sadly, the slower acting poisons, including those that require animals to consume multiple doses, will still cause animals who ingest them to suffer prolonged and agonizing deaths. As your editorial points out, poisoning rats isn't an effective means of rodent control because surviving rats will have a baby boom and rats from surrounding areas will move in to fill the void left by those who were killed.
NEWS
December 10, 2013
While Maryland officials remain at odds about implementing poor people's constitutional guarantee to counsel at first appearances ("Maryland has an opportunity to lead the way in bail reform," Nov. 29), the judiciary can help break the logjam and demonstrate the benefits of taking a humanitarian approach toward the people expected to spend Christmas and New Year's in jail while awaiting trial on non-violent charges. Maryland law requires every administrative judge to conduct a weekly review of the pretrial jail population.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | March 18, 2012
I was a passenger in a car on Thursday morning, and we stopped for a fill-up at a gas station on North Charles Street in Baltimore, a block up from North Avenue. I was on the phone while the driver purchased and pumped the gasoline. A young, male panhandler tried to make eye contact with me through the passenger's side window, but I avoided being drawn into his tractor beam. Some panhandlers appear broken and docile, some seem impatient and even angry; some have yellow heroin eyes or some other form of medicated stare.
NEWS
By SARA ENGRAM | March 20, 1994
Two centuries ago Benjamin Franklin, that paragon of American self-reliance, took a dim view of government attempts to relieve poverty: ''There is no country in the world where so many provisions are established for them; so many hospitals receive them when they are sick and lame, founded and maintained by voluntary charities; so many almshouses for the aged of both sexes, together with a solemn law made by the rich to subject their estates to heavy tax...
NEWS
By JAMES J. KILPATRICK | December 27, 1994
Which quality in a judge has the greater value -- judicial compassion or judicial restraint?It is an old question, rooted in the distinction between justice, which is one thing, and law, which may be quite another. In the wake of California's referendum last month, the courts are about to revisit the issue. The state voted to deny certain public benefits, most notably public education, to immigrants who have entered the state unlawfully.Opponents have filed suit, but for the time being everything is on hold.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | May 18, 2014
A hypothetical scenario: Your little boy lies in a hospital bed, stricken by a mysterious, potentially fatal disease. You are frightened and in despair. But your community rallies around you. Soon, the whole town is talking about your ordeal. Neighbors you've never spoken to send cards. Co-workers you've never socialized with send encouraging text messages. None of it changes the objective fact of your son's condition, doesn't kill a virus, lessen a fever or ease his pain.
NEWS
By Robert G. Newman | August 8, 2014
On June 21, the Vatican press office published the presentation made by Pope Francis to the 31st International Drug Enforcement Conference (IDEC) in Rome. The pope told the conferees, "The problem of drug use is not solved with drugs! … Substitute drugs are not an adequate therapy, but rather a veiled means of surrendering to the phenomenon. " These comments represent an unfortunate, categorical rejection of "maintenance" treatment of opioid addiction with medications such as methadone.
NEWS
By Scott Novak | June 28, 2014
Growing up in rural Harford County - a red county in a blue state - I quickly became exposed to the many fears that conservative voters have concerning illegal immigration. The Mexicans, I was told as a child (because apparently everyone who illegally crosses the U.S. border is Mexican), were coming to take American jobs. They were coming to deal drugs and spread crime. They were coming to live off of our social welfare programs, all the while avoiding the payment of taxes and not even bothering to learn English.
NEWS
June 16, 2014
I was outraged to read that our mayor, congressman and senator all found reasons to oppose the Obama administration's proposal to turn the former Social Security Administration building downtown into a shelter for homeless immigrant children ( "Rawlings-Blake voices concern over immigrant shelter," June 10). Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake was quoted as having "serious concerns" about placing the children at the Metro West complex. Well, I have serious concerns too - about our elected officials' lack of compassion.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
A company that runs health care facilities for seniors in 17 states across the country is building its new headquarters in Baltimore County. Compass Pointe Healthcare System expects to finish construction of the four-story building at the Bare Hills Business Park in May 2015. A ceremonial groundbreaking with county officials is scheduled for Wednesday. Compass Pointe is the new name of Senior Living Centers LLC, formerly based in Indianapolis, and is made up of firms acquired over the past few years, including Encore Healthcare in Columbia and Perennial Healthcare in Hunt Valley, company officials said.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2014
This month, Compass Rose founding artistic director Lucinda Merry-Browne offers an ambitious finish to the theater's third season, bringing to Annapolis a play that she also directs. The show is Frank Anthony Polito's "Another Day on Willow Street," which received a New York City Fringe Festival workshop presentation in August 2007. Merry-Browne welcomes the challenge, noting that "producing a new play is vital to the future of theater. New works are crucial for the theater, actors and audiences to experience.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | May 19, 2014
Here's a question. If -- and this is a big if -- the United States could dispatch a swarm of heretofore secret super-drones to find and kill every member of the Nigerian terrorist group Boko Haram, would you be in favor of doing it? I'll even modify it for those of you who are squeamish about killing terrorists who slaughter men, women and children with abandon. What if the drones could simply paralyze the terrorists long enough for the U.S., or the Nigerians or some duly authorized force of U.N.-sanctioned "good guys," to apprehend them?
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | July 12, 2007
A word of advice to Mayor Sheila Dixon: Next time "motherly compassion" strikes, reach for a bottle of "mayoral common sense." Try measuring the interests of one person against the interests of thousands of other inhabitants of Baltimore -- the vast majority of your constituents -- and maybe you won't have to apologize for a mistake such as the one you and your chief of staff made in the matter of Charles Murel. You tried to get this 20-year-old convicted carjacker, awaiting trial on a handgun charge, out of jail to attend his 3-year-old son's funeral.
NEWS
By Deepak Chopra | April 22, 2007
While listening to the flood of coverage about the shooting rampage at Virginia Tech, I caught a comment from an English professor, Lucinda Roy, who taught the student gunman. Ms. Roy spotted that Cho Seung-Hui was extremely disturbed. She had read his violent fantasies in English class, and although many others detected an isolated, withdrawn loner, she realized how serious the situation was. She feared that Mr. Cho was suicidal, and took steps to help him. In that regard, Ms. Roy was singular in her compassion.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | May 18, 2014
A hypothetical scenario: Your little boy lies in a hospital bed, stricken by a mysterious, potentially fatal disease. You are frightened and in despair. But your community rallies around you. Soon, the whole town is talking about your ordeal. Neighbors you've never spoken to send cards. Co-workers you've never socialized with send encouraging text messages. None of it changes the objective fact of your son's condition, doesn't kill a virus, lessen a fever or ease his pain.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2014
Dr. Stanley Roy Platman, a retired psychiatrist and health administrator recalled as a champion of community-based mental health services, died after heart surgery May 7 at MedStar Union Memorial Hospital. The Guilford resident was 79. "Stanley would take on as patients human beings most others in his field would not," said Ellen Callegary, an attorney who represents clients with disabilities and lives in Baltimore. "He helped people with complex needs, including those with developmental disabilities and mental illnesses.
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