Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCompany S Stock
IN THE NEWS

Company S Stock

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | September 23, 1999
Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. had set itself up for a whipping, and yesterday the whipping came.The Cockeysville broadcasting company's stock lost 28.5 percent of its value yesterday, falling $4.1875 to close at $10.50. The steep decline came after Sinclair warned late Tuesday that its new campaign to invest in television-station personnel, programming and promotion would help drag down its financial numbers for the rest of the year.Investors exchanged 11.33 million Sinclair shares, making the stock the 12th most active on U.S. markets yesterday.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
December 19, 2009
Activist investor Nelson Peltz has increased his ownership stake in Baltimore money manager Legg Mason Inc., according to a Securities and Exchange Commission filing this week. Peltz, who joined the company's board this fall after acquiring 4.3 percent of the company's stock, bought an additional 717,000 shares this week. That increases his holdings to just under 7.7 million shares, or 4.75 percent of the company. Peltz is known for targeting good but underperforming brands, but Legg Mason said he is not trying to push for the company's sale or breakup.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Jeff Brown and By Jeff Brown,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 23, 2001
If it's free, it must be a good deal, right? Not always. Take your employer's stock, for instance. Lots of Americans receive company stock as part or all of the employer's contribution to the 401(k) retirement plan. It's often a lousy deal. At Enron Corp., the Houston energy-trading company that filed for bankruptcy Dec. 2., shares skyrocketed in the late 1990s, hitting $90 a little more than a year ago and making thousands of employees rich, on paper at least. Currently Enron shares are trading at under $1. Those employees aren't likely to recover because shareholders are the last in line when a company's assets are divvied up in bankruptcy court to pay debts.
BUSINESS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,Sun reporter | July 27, 2007
NEW YORK -- A federal judge set a $500,000 bond yesterday for a former executive at a Maryland technology company who has been charged with manipulating stock option grants to allow top employees to lock in unlawful stock gains and exaggerated bonuses. Flanked by two attorneys and watched by her husband in the courtroom gallery, Carole D. Argo, 46, a former chief financial officer, president and chief operating officer of SafeNet Inc. in Belcamp, in Harford County, entered a not guilty plea in U.S. District Court in Manhattan on charges of securities fraud and conspiracy.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | March 13, 2001
It was nearly the end of the meeting before the question was asked: What about the stock price? Shares of Ciena Corp. tumbled 18 percent, or $11.81, yesterday to close at $53.31. During morning trading, the stock price hit $51.44 - a 21 percent drop from Friday's closing price. "There are big market factors occurring," Patrick H. Nettles, Ciena's chairman and chief executive officer, said yesterday at the company's annual shareholders meeting in Linthicum. "I think we are seeing the result of investor emotions as much as investor logic."
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson | October 18, 1998
DOUGLAS L. Becker, president of Sylvan Learning Systems Inc., made the mistake of checking the company's stock price on a day recently when the market was being ripped apart.What Becker saw was grim. Sylvan's stock had slid to a 52-week low of $18.25 on Oct. 5 -- sliced in half in a little over two months from a high of $36.875."I was just looking at it, shaking my head," Becker said. "That's kind of a stunning decline. I walked into the lobby and it was the same building, the same people, the same product.
BUSINESS
By Peter H. Frank | September 13, 1990
The stock of MNC Financial Inc. opened with a bang yesterday morning before fizzling away much of its initial gain and closing at $7.875 a share, up 37.5 cents.In the first trading since the company announced it would be keeping its regular 29-cent-a-share quarterly dividend, the banking company's stock jumped 15 percent from Tuesday's close, opening at $8.125 a share.But in a slow and steady decline, MNC lost most of the initial gain in heavy trading. The company was the 12th most active stock on the New York Stock Exchange with more than 1.27 million shares changing hands.
BUSINESS
By Dow Jones News Service | May 25, 1991
NEW YORK -- The Securities and Exchange Commission is thinking about stripping big short-sellers of their anonymity.Sometime this summer, commission officials say, the SEC will seek public comment on a proposal that would force investors to disclose when they have a short position of 5 percent or more of any company's stock. The plan would work like the SEC's 13d filings, in which investors must disclose when they own 5 percent or more of a company's stock.Short-sellers, who bet that a stock will decline, borrow shares and immediately sell them.
BUSINESS
January 3, 1993
In today's Business section, you'll find a year-end review of all major stocks and mutual funds. Besides serving as a quick analysis of the financial winners and losers of 1992, the charts offer important tax and investment information.* The tables provide an estimate of how much investment income you must declare for 1992.You must declare dividends on stocks as income, says Lyle Benson of the Towson-based accounting firm of Coyne & McClean. You also must declare as income dividends and gains on mutual funds.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 6, 2004
NEW YORK - Martha Stewart, whose multimillion-dollar empire is based on her impeccable skills on both the homemaking and business-building fronts, was found guilty yesterday of making an uncharacteristic mess of things: lying, conspiring and obstructing a federal investigation of her suspiciously timed sale of stock in a biotech company. As the verdict was read - guilty on all four counts - Stewart maintained the stony expression she wore throughout much of the six-week trial, as her daughter, Alexis, crouched over and buried her face in her hands.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN REPORTER | July 26, 2007
Carole D. Argo, a former top executive at Harford County technology company SafeNet Inc., was indicted yesterday on charges of rigging stock-option grants in a six-year scheme that netted her and other employees millions of dollars in improper stock gains and inflated bonuses. Argo, 46, is expected to be arraigned today in Manhattan federal court on charges of securities fraud and conspiracy. If convicted, she faces a maximum of 25 years in prison and fines of at least $250,000, according to the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Southern District of New York.
BUSINESS
By John Schmeltzer and John Schmeltzer,Chicago Tribune | October 13, 2006
Shares of McDonald's Corp., the world's largest restaurant operator, have rebounded in the past few months to levels not seen in more than six years. The climb comes on the heels of a 50 percent boost in the company's dividend and pressure from a hedge fund manager threatening a proxy fight. The company's stock has risen more than 25 percent from the July 14 close of $33.04 to yesterday's closing price of $42.23 on news that its September sales were stronger than expected and third-quarter profits would exceed the predictions of analysts.
BUSINESS
By TRICIA BISHOP and TRICIA BISHOP,SUN REPORTER | January 6, 2006
Shares of Advancis Pharmaceutical Corp. fell slightly in moderate trading yesterday on news that a planned sale of its only revenue-generating product fell through. In August, the Germantown drugmaker struck a deal to sell the rights to manufacture and market its Keflex antibiotic to a privately held company for about $11 million, the same price it paid to buy the drug from Eli Lilly and Co. in 2004. The money was to pay for retooled clinical trials of another, developing antibiotic in which Advancis has high hopes despite two testing failures.
BUSINESS
By Janet Kidd Stewart | August 7, 2005
Back in the day, when their stocks were flying high, Colleen and Daniel Ganzer would plug their savings information into financial calculators and smile. It was early 2000, they were still in their mid-30s, and Dan's 401(k) plan was worth a quarter of a million dollars. Five years and one tech-stock meltdown later, things look a lit tle different. They've continued to save and have added to other accounts, but the 401(k) account stands at $105,000 - largely because of losses on his own company's stock - Lucent Technologies.
BUSINESS
By Lizzie Newland and Lizzie Newland,SUN STAFF | July 20, 2005
FTI Consulting Inc., an Annapolis-based consulting company in the hot field of forensic accounting, said yesterday that it will tap public debt markets for the first time by selling $300 million in notes. Company officials said the offering will provide more financial flexibility by allowing FTI to refinance bank debt, while analysts said it would put FTI in good position to make acquisitions. "I'd be surprised if we didn't see something before the end of the year," said David Gold, senior equity analyst at Sidoti & Co., a research firm in New York.
BUSINESS
By Rhasheema A. Sweeting and Rhasheema A. Sweeting,SUN STAFF | July 6, 2005
Environmental Elements Corp., a nearly 60-year-old Baltimore company that produces air pollution-control equipment, has filed for bankruptcy and plans to sell its remaining operations. The company, in a statement, blamed the bankruptcy on increased competition and higher prices for steel and other raw materials. The bankruptcy filing follows a trend of downward sales and profits over the past three years. Sales plunged to $27.5 million in 2004 from $43.7 million in 2003 and $71.9 million in 2002, according to the company's most recent annual report for the fiscal year that ended in March 2004.
BUSINESS
By Peter H. Frank | November 20, 1990
The stock of USF&G Corp. received a shellacking yesterday, falling more than 23 percent after a published report laid out a slate of bearish views on the Baltimore-based insurance giant.USF&G, which was trading above $30 a share as recently as March, closed yesterday at $7.75 a share, down $2.375 a share, its lowest level in more than a decade.Nearly 2.6 million of the company's 83.8 million shares outstanding changed hands, making it the most actively traded stock on the New York Stock Exchange.
BUSINESS
By John Schmeltzer and John Schmeltzer,Chicago Tribune | October 13, 2006
Shares of McDonald's Corp., the world's largest restaurant operator, have rebounded in the past few months to levels not seen in more than six years. The climb comes on the heels of a 50 percent boost in the company's dividend and pressure from a hedge fund manager threatening a proxy fight. The company's stock has risen more than 25 percent from the July 14 close of $33.04 to yesterday's closing price of $42.23 on news that its September sales were stronger than expected and third-quarter profits would exceed the predictions of analysts.
BUSINESS
By Rhasheema A. Sweeting and Rhasheema A. Sweeting,SUN STAFF | July 6, 2005
Environmental Elements Corp., a nearly 60-year-old Baltimore company that produces air pollution control equipment, has filed for bankruptcy and plans to sell its remaining operations. The company, in a statement, blamed the bankruptcy on increased competition and higher prices for steel and other raw materials. The bankruptcy filing follows a trend of downward sales and profits over the past three years. Sales plunged to $27.5 million in 2004 from $43.7 million in 2003 and $71.9 million in 2002, according to the company's most recent annual report for the fiscal year that ended in March 2004.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 6, 2004
NEW YORK - Martha Stewart, whose multimillion-dollar empire is based on her impeccable skills on both the homemaking and business-building fronts, was found guilty yesterday of making an uncharacteristic mess of things: lying, conspiring and obstructing a federal investigation of her suspiciously timed sale of stock in a biotech company. As the verdict was read - guilty on all four counts - Stewart maintained the stony expression she wore throughout much of the six-week trial, as her daughter, Alexis, crouched over and buried her face in her hands.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.