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By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau | March 26, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Long-distance telephone companies in Maryland would have the power to condemn private property under a bill that moved quietly through the Senate and received an equally quiet hearing before a House committee yesterday.The bill would allow these companies -- as long as they own their own wire in Maryland and are approved by the Public Service Commission -- to purchase private land even against the owner's wishes. C&P Telephone Co. and American Telephone & Telegraph currently have that right.
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BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2013
Uncertainty over the economy contributed to a nearly 27 percent drop last year in venture capital funding for young companies in Maryland, Washington and Northern Virginia, the first decrease since 2009, according to a new report from PricewaterhouseCoopers. Last year, venture capitalists invested $725.1 million in 164 deals in the area, down from $987.5 million for 163 deals in 2011. On a percentage basis, the decrease in dollars was more than twice the national average for last year, when funding dropped 10 percent to $26.5 billion invested in nearly 3,700 deals, PricewaterhouseCoopers reported.
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BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | February 2, 2002
Private venture capital funds are not providing enough money to support Maryland's rapidly growing biotechnology industry, according to a study released yesterday by the Maryland Department of Business and Economic Development and two other organizations. The study found that the state's biotechnology industry has a "venture capital funding gap" of $50 million to $100 million annually. Maryland also ranks 12th out of a dozen states in private venture capital financing relative to the number of biotechnology firms in each state.
NEWS
By David Nitkin, Andrew A. Green and Sumathi Reddy and David Nitkin, Andrew A. Green and Sumathi Reddy,SUN STAFF | April 10, 2005
Pushing to wrap up business as they head toward adjournment, Maryland legislators gave final approval yesterday to a bill requiring large companies, principally Wal-Mart, to spend a specific portion of their payroll on health care costs or pay a tax to the state. The measure, which has drawn national attention and criticism from radio host Rush Limbaugh and other conservative commentators, was adopted during a fast-paced day of lawmaking as the General Assembly prepares for the end of the session at midnight tomorrow.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau | March 26, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Long-distance telephone companies in Maryland would have the power to condemn private property under a bill that moved quietly through the Senate and received an equally quiet hearing before a House committee yesterday.The bill would allow these companies -- as long as they own their own wire in Maryland and are approved by the Public Service Commission -- to purchase private land even against the owner's wishes. C&P Telephone Co. and American Telephone & Telegraph currently have that right.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Sun Staff Writer | October 17, 1994
Saccharin, Bufferin and the AIDS drug AZT all stem at least partly from research done in Maryland. But none of them is produced here.Today, state officials and private backers break ground on a project they hope will change all that. Construction will begin on the BioCenter, a $21 million pilot manufacturing facility where fledgling, cash-strapped biotechnology firms can share costly small-scale manufacturing facilities.Officials hope the center will help Maryland companies get the next Bufferin or AZT to market without having to turn to out-of-state companies for the millions it takes to bring a drug through years of clinical trials and U.S. Food and Drug Administration review.
BUSINESS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Deidre Nerreau McCabe,Sun Staff Writer | May 28, 1995
New Hampshire business executive Michael D. Dingman has made a second $2 million donation to the University of Maryland's College of Business and Management.The gift, which makes Mr. Dingman the second largest contributor in the business school's history, is earmarked for the Dingman Center for Entrepreneurship at the College Park business school."We were very surprised by this gift," said Charles O. Heller, the center's director. "Mike has been very generous and supportive in the past. . . . At this point, just the interest from his initial endowment is the largest source of income at the center."
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | September 26, 2001
The Maryland Department of Business and Economic Development has hired a private consultant to assist small and minority business owners with specialized services that they need to expand, but don't have the money to pay for. The department will pay Owings Mills-based Booth Management Consulting LLC up to $1.1 million over the next three years to provide assistance that goes beyond writing a basic business plan or applying for a loan. Booth Management will pair small companies with experts who can help them develop a Web site, apply for a patent or enhance technology within a company.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN STAFF | December 12, 1995
Maryland and the District of Columbia had more black-owned businesses than ever in 1992 and their concentrations of black-owned firms continued to lead the nation, new analysis shows.But as in the rest of the country, black businesses collected far less revenue and employed fewer people, on average, than did other companies in the area.The report, to be published this month by the U.S. Census Bureau, is likely to fan debate in Congress and in many states over proposals to cut aid and preference programs for minority companies.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Sun Staff Writer | February 28, 1995
The collapse of Barings Bros. & Co., the London merchant bank that helped finance some of Maryland's biggest public works more than 150 years ago, will have little effect on the state it helped build or the financial companies that now do business in Maryland.The news yesterday that Barings PLC, the parent company, was ruined by $1 billion in losing bets made by one derivatives trader in its Singapore office sent ripples through stock and currency markets around the world.But other than unsettled markets, companies in Maryland reported few aftershocks.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | October 23, 2003
Skill and creativity have helped Eva Anderson Dancers Ltd. grow into a well-known and respected modern dance group in the Baltimore-Washington region. But supporters say persistence has been just as important, as the company begins its 30th season. "I just kept doing it," said Anderson, a Columbia choreographer who has been the creative and administrative force behind the company for three decades. "It seems like artists that are successful are those that didn't quit." The Eva Anderson Dancers - the oldest professional modern dance company in Maryland - will celebrate its milestone with performances at Baltimore Museum of Art on Saturday and Sunday.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | March 3, 2003
Maryland lawmakers are considering clamping down on the fancy meals, theater tickets and expensive trips lavished on doctors by pharmaceutical companies trying to persuade health care professionals to prescribe their medications. "The system bothers me," said Del. Charles R. Boutin, a Harford County Republican. "Everyone involved may have been trapped in a cycle of competitive action." Boutin is the sponsor of a bill that would prevent physicians, nurse practitioners and pharmacists from accepting gifts worth more than $50 from pharmaceutical companies.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | February 2, 2002
Private venture capital funds are not providing enough money to support Maryland's rapidly growing biotechnology industry, according to a study released yesterday by the Maryland Department of Business and Economic Development and two other organizations. The study found that the state's biotechnology industry has a "venture capital funding gap" of $50 million to $100 million annually. Maryland also ranks 12th out of a dozen states in private venture capital financing relative to the number of biotechnology firms in each state.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | September 26, 2001
The Maryland Department of Business and Economic Development has hired a private consultant to assist small and minority business owners with specialized services that they need to expand, but don't have the money to pay for. The department will pay Owings Mills-based Booth Management Consulting LLC up to $1.1 million over the next three years to provide assistance that goes beyond writing a basic business plan or applying for a loan. Booth Management will pair small companies with experts who can help them develop a Web site, apply for a patent or enhance technology within a company.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2001
While many companies cut employees as sales slowed in the first half of this year, Baltimore-based Under Armour Athletic Apparel added 15 people, increased revenue by nearly 400 percent and moved into a new office building. As they work from the newly renovated, 10,000- square-foot building in the shadows of PSINet football stadium, the executives of Under Armour are planning for more growth. The company, which manufactures moisture-wicking athletic wear, is creating a new women's line and looking to build its customer base, which includes the Baltimore Ravens and 27 other NFL teams.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Sun Staff | January 23, 2000
If any theme will mark the biotechnology industry in the coming year, says industry expert G. Steven Burrill, it likely will be this: The big will grow larger while the small struggle on. Only this year, the struggle shouldn't be quite as exhausting. That said, the industry should also find a friendlier investor climate, predicts Burrill, chief executive officer of San Francisco-based merchant bank Burrill & Co., a major biotechnology industry investor. Already this year investors have been flocking back to the industry.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | March 3, 2003
Maryland lawmakers are considering clamping down on the fancy meals, theater tickets and expensive trips lavished on doctors by pharmaceutical companies trying to persuade health care professionals to prescribe their medications. "The system bothers me," said Del. Charles R. Boutin, a Harford County Republican. "Everyone involved may have been trapped in a cycle of competitive action." Boutin is the sponsor of a bill that would prevent physicians, nurse practitioners and pharmacists from accepting gifts worth more than $50 from pharmaceutical companies.
NEWS
By David Nitkin, Andrew A. Green and Sumathi Reddy and David Nitkin, Andrew A. Green and Sumathi Reddy,SUN STAFF | April 10, 2005
Pushing to wrap up business as they head toward adjournment, Maryland legislators gave final approval yesterday to a bill requiring large companies, principally Wal-Mart, to spend a specific portion of their payroll on health care costs or pay a tax to the state. The measure, which has drawn national attention and criticism from radio host Rush Limbaugh and other conservative commentators, was adopted during a fast-paced day of lawmaking as the General Assembly prepares for the end of the session at midnight tomorrow.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | November 20, 1998
When a set decorator needed a rusty mop bucket as a prop in the feature film "Liberty Heights" last month, the operator of a local antiques mall went to her utility closet and pulled out the perfect model.Elaine Ezell, president of AAA Antiques Mall Inc. in Hanover, has been doing business with the film industry for several years, working from lists to provide items quickly.Each film that comes in represents $15,000 or $20,000 in revenue to the 450 antiques dealers at her mall, she said. This year, she estimates, the film industry has brought in at least $50,000.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | January 18, 1998
For a select few companies in Maryland's growing biotechnology industry, the march to profitability should hasten in the year ahead.But for the lion's share of the 300 Maryland-based companies in this promising and risk-filled industry, the focus will be on advancing laboratory research and human clinical data on the drugs and other cutting-edge medical treatments in development.The tedious process -- and frequent setbacks -- in getting products to market has made biotech companies a test of patience for many investors.
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