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NEWS
April 20, 2011
Letter writer Robert W. Palter of Timonium ("Bring back U.S. manufacturing jobs," April 19) is right. We desperately need manufacturing jobs in the United States. However, the owners of U.S. businesses will not allow it. God forbid the citizens should demand higher wages for their labor. It is impossible to buy anything in the U.S. now that wasn't made in China, Vietnam, Mexico and countries I've never heard of because American businesses, with the blessing of the U.S. government, have moved their companies offshore in order to hire people who are desperate to work for a dollar a day. Our government and big business created this situation because it benefits them and to hell with the people.
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BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
In the age of smartphones and tablets, delivering restaurant food can be more than just taking calls, making the stuff, bagging it and sending a guy out in a rundown Toyota. On the fourth floor of a refurbished broom factory in Canton, a room full of young men in T-shirts, polo shirts and Orioles caps work at a long table laden with computers on OrderUp, a food service with a technology twist. They're busy with the further development of the technology that their company combined with logistical calculation to create a formula that's delivering in 36 markets from Maryland to California.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2014
Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler has sent letters to 10 e-cigarette manufacturers questioning what the companies are doing to prevent sales to underage buyers. The letters come as the safety and regulation of the devices face increased scrutiny. The makers of e-cigarettes say the devices are safer than traditional cigarettes and can help smokers quit, but reports of poisonings related to the products have spiked. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently said it is seeking regulatory authority over the devices.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
A claim that has also been central to Republican gubernatorial candidate Larry Hogan's critique of Maryland's economy - that the state has lost most of its Fortune 500 companies during the O'Malley administration - turns out to be false. That assertion has been a staple of Hogan's stump speech. Hogan repeated the claim, with minor variations, throughout the primary contest and has continued to make it a central talking point in his general election campaign against Democrat Anthony G. Brown.
NEWS
May 2, 2012
Your recent article about corporate contributions to candidates is worth reading ("O'Malley weighs donor changes," April 30). However, the practice of big business being involved behind the scenes is not new. Companies with employees having expense accounts in the past have "suggested" they send personal checks for themselves and wife and carry the amount on their expense accounts showing entertainment (dinner) with clients or customers. If employees were limited by budget restrictions in the amount that could be submitted on the expense account, it was waived to accommodate the "contribution.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2013
Maryland is investing a total of $350,000 into two Maryland technology companies, Gov. Martin O'Malley announced Monday. The state invested $200,000 in SocialToaster, a Baltimore company that has developed a social media marketing system, and $150,000 in ReelGenie, a Silver Spring firm that creates videos from users' photos and other digital media. The money came from the InvestMaryland program, created in 2011 to stimulate investment in Maryland tech companies. SocialToaster, used by outfits including Nickelodeon and the Baltimore Ravens, employs 17 people and expects to increase its staff by 30 percent by the year's end. ReelGenie employs four people and plans to add marketing, software development and business development staff.
NEWS
March 24, 2012
For manipulating energy markets Constellation Energy has just paid the highest penalty in history - $245 million - to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission ("Merger, record fine OK'd," March 13). That's more than all previous penalties combined. While the media and their audience are distracted by sensational stories, real stories about issues that impact our daily lives seem to be ignored. While we pay higher energy rates, and while churches like the one I serve help poor people keep their lights on, Constellation Energy manipulates energy markets, cuts deals, and no one is going to jail.
NEWS
February 5, 2010
The University of Maryland says it is teaming with Maryland companies on 17 research projects to develop products for technologies ranging from wind power to removing nutrients from wastewater. Other projects include restoring vegetation in the Chesapeake Bay and medical technologies for diabetes, kidney disease and other conditions. The companies include Hunt Valley-based Mastix Medica, which is developing a chewing gum to help dialysis patients control phosphorus levels, and Jessup-based American Dynamics Flight Systems, which is working on propulsion systems for unmanned aircraft that can take off and land vertically.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2012
For the casino giants trying to persuade Marylanders to vote for or against more gambling here, the long-term stakes could be in the billions. Penn National Gaming's investment of $13 million for ads urging a "no" vote on Question 7 is pocket change compared with the revenue it stands to lose at its Charles Town, W.Va., casino if Maryland expands gambling. One analyst estimates the West Virginia site accounts for $200 million a year in cash flow for the company — a quarter of its total.
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2013
It's just urine. But for a Baltimore company and a rival, it's liquid gold worth bruising legal battles. When a patient is prescribed a powerful painkiller like Vicodin or OxyContin, many doctors require periodic urine tests to check dosage levels as part of safeguards to ensure the drug isn't being abused. Some states are making the practice law, and that means a big opportunity for Baltimore-based Ameritox Ltd. and other companies that have rushed to meet the demand. The competition has spawned no fewer than a half-dozen lawsuits in recent years and what one judge called an "advertising war" between Ameritox and San Diego-based rival Millennium Laboratories.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | October 8, 2014
According to a new federal database put online last week, pharmaceutical companies and device makers paid doctors some $380 million in speaking and consulting fees over a five-month period in 2013. Some doctors received over $500,000 each, and some got millions of dollars in royalties from products they helped develop. Doctors claim these payments have no effect on what they prescribe. But why would drug companies shell out all of this money if it didn't provide them a healthy return on their investment?
NEWS
October 7, 2014
It actually doesn't do much good to head up an article about payments to doctors by telling readers that a doctor invented a great new device and the company sent him a check for royalties ( "Payments to doctors from drug companies, device makers revealed," Oct. 4). What would have been helpful is if your reporter had focused on whether the payments were justified instead of solely on the number of dollars. What's news is when device companies send kickbacks to doctors who didn't invent a device but merely used it rather than one from a competing company.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
Baltimore's continually blossoming theater scene has another bud. Cohesion Theatre Company , to be based in the Highlandtown Arts and Culture District, will debut in November with a production of Shakespeare's "Coriolanus. " (Given the arrival of Chesapeake Shakespeare Company, the Bard appears to be on a roll this season in Baltimore.) The Cohesion ensemble also plans to stage two Baltimore premieres: Tom Horan's "Thirteen Dead Husbands" in March, Anna Moench's "The Pillow Book" next summer.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
Late last year, medical device maker Zimmer Holdings Inc. made two large payments to Dr. Andrew N. Pollak, chair of the University of Maryland Medical System's orthopedics department. The payments, one for $47,225 and the other for $45,902, were royalties paid to Pollak for work he did at Maryland Shock Trauma Center starting seven years ago in helping develop a clamp known as a fixator that could hold trauma patient's broken bones straight until they were ready for surgical repair.
NEWS
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
On the Chesapeake Bay, the summertime months are made for cruising. From the crisp mornings of late spring through the hazy evenings of August, a boat on the bay is the place to be. And how better to cruise than in a boat built by one of the bay's own builders? A handful of companies, on the Eastern and Western shores, design and build custom boats that are worthy of any body of water. But, thanks to their creators' deep knowledge of the area, these yachts are especially at home in the bay. Campbell's Custom Yachts 26106A Bachelor Harbor Drive, Oxford 800-361-4786 campbellsboatyards.com For Tom and Susan Campbell, owners of Campbell's Custom Yachts and three marinas in Oxford, what they do every day all comes down to one thing: the finished project.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Mary M. "Margie" Adams, who worked for a mortgage origination company and was a physical fitness enthusiast, died Friday at her Sparks home of a massive heart attack. She was 49. The daughter of Dr. Hector F. DiNardo Jr., a dentist, and Margaret Meekins DiNardo, a homemaker, Mary Margaret DiNardo was born in Baltimore and raised in Timonium. She was a 1983 graduate of Notre Dame Preparatory School and attended Marymount University and what is now McDaniel College. From 1987 to 1989, she was a medical scheduler at the Greater Baltimore Medical Center, and from 1989 to 1993 was a claims adjuster in the Owings Mills office of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Maryland.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
A claim that has been central to Republican gubernatorial candidate Larry Hogan's critique of Maryland's economy — that the state has lost most of its Fortune 500 companies during the O'Malley administration — turns out to be false. That assertion has been a staple of Hogan's standard stump speech. Hogan repeated the claim, with minor variations, throughout the primary contest and has continued to make it a central talking point in his general election campaign against Democrat Anthony G. Brown.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2013
A bill introduced in the Maryland Senate Thursday would create a commission to look into regulating payroll service companies in the wake of allegations of fraud at AccuPay of Bel Air. Sen. Barry Glassman, a Harford County Republican, introduced the bill on the Senate floor, prompted, he said, by hundreds of calls from concerned small-business owners. AccuPay is under investigation for allegedly not sending clients' tax payments to tax collectors. "AccuPay of Bel Air recently filed bankruptcy, leaving hundreds of small businesses with delayed payroll and delinquent or missed tax payments to the state and federal government," Glassman said in announcing the bill.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
A former Macy's and I Magnin executive will step in as brand president of Jos. A. Bank Clothiers, part of the Hampstead-based Bank's integration into parent company Men's Wearhouse. Bank's new president, Paul Fitzpatrick, most recently served as president and chief operating officer of ESP Group Ltd., a designer of underwear, sleepwear and lounge wear. In another executive team change, former Jos. Bank executive Jim Thorne will become executive vice president of direct sourcing, overseeing Men's Wearhouse's overall product development, manufacturing and sourcing, the Houston-based men's apparel chain said Tuesday.
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