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EXPLORE
April 16, 2012
Those who travel by MARC train to get to work are in for a treat as Harford Commuter Assistance, elected officials and special guests will be on hand from 5:30 to 9 a.m. at the Edgewood MARC Train Station May 2, and the Aberdeen MARC Train Station May 8 with giveaways and light refreshments as well as commuting information as part of May's designation as Clean Commute Month. These are commuters who, day after day, board the MARC train heading south to Baltimore and other destinations, includingWashington, D.C.to get to work.
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NEWS
September 18, 2014
John Harding, a maglev scientist from Palm Springs, Calif., blithely asserts that "the Amtrak station" (it's called Penn Station, Hon) should be moved downtown "for the sake of local commuters" ( "Maglev outperforms other trains," Sept. 16). It's a sure bet he has never conferred either with people who use Penn Station who are not all commuters or with those who would be affected either by its abandonment or by the disruption and expense associated with constructing a new one and the tracks leading to it. Good urban planning begins with respect for existing structures and communities.
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NEWS
September 4, 2006
There is a small but memorable scene in Russian novelist and dissident Alexander Solzhenitsyn's Gulag Archipelago in which he sits upon the banks of the Belomor Canal, observing two nearly identical barges equally loaded with pine logs moving past each other in opposite directions. "And canceling the one load against the other," the author wrote, "we get zero." In seemingly endless lines moving in opposite directions, Maryland drivers spend more time behind the wheel going to and from work and school than ever.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
Afternoon MARC service to Perryville and Aberdeen will be restored for the afternoon commute, according to the Maryland Transit Administration. Service to the two northern-most stations, canceled since a freight train damaged catenary wires and utility poles along the Northeast Corridor on Tuesday, will begin again with the No. 520 MARC train set to depart Washington's Union Station at 12:20 p.m., the MTA said. Amtrak service between Washington and Wilmington had also been suspended on Tuesday, but single-tracking was restored Tuesday afternoon.
NEWS
October 16, 1990
When it comes to traffic gridlock, Baltimore still is light years away from becoming a Los Angeles or Washington. But the bottlenecks are multiplying and the confusion of commuters is mounting. It is harder and more time-consuming to get from home to work.Doug Birch's Oct. 7 Sunday Sun story on commuting pains, complete with a list of readers' worst traffic headaches, highlights the need for continuing action in Annapolis to find some answers before congestion harms this region's economic vitality.
EXPLORE
November 15, 2011
There are a couple things that make my daily commute a little worse. The first is what I call "ramp riders," motorists who take an exit ramp not to exit, but to bypass slower traffic by continuing onto the on-ramp to merge into traffic ahead of where they were when they exited. This is especially prevalent on Maryland Route 32 at U.S. Route 1 in the afternoons in the northbound directions. It's gotten worse in the last couple years with the influx of workers to the Fort Meade area. This also occurs in the afternoon on Route 95 North at Calverton (Route 212)
NEWS
September 23, 1990
On the theory that you can still get there from here -- but just barely -- we'd like to hear from Baltimore-area commuters who have suffered and triumphed during their daily odyssey to the factory or office.The Sun is taking a look at the worst of the region's commuting problems and plans to recount some of the misadventures of motorists and Metro, train and bus riders who race to work by the dawn's early light.To tell your tale, park yourself at a Touch-tone phone and dial Sundial any time today or tomorrow.
NEWS
October 10, 1990
WESTMINSTER - Commuters from the city won't be able to hop a train to Baltimore in the future since the existing lines cannot be used for high-speed passenger use, the president of Maryland Midland Railroad told the Train Station Committee at its first meeting.Although the tracks are good for freight, Paul Denton said, a trip to the Owings Mills metro station would take an hour or longer since speeds on the line reach only 35 or 40 miles an hour.Committee members then discussed other uses for the proposed train station which would be a replica of the one which stood in town at the turn of the century.
NEWS
September 1, 1993
For long-frazzled rush-hour commuters, help may be on the way. But first, they've got to give up their stubborn streak of independence and recruit a friend or neighbor who wants to join in car-pooling it to work. Then all they will have to do is hop on the high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) lane and zip along the interstate, bypassing all those solo drivers tied up in endless traffic jams.That's the vision of highway planners who open their first HOV lane later this month in Montgomery County. If this experiment is as successful as expected, there will be HOV lanes for cars with two or more passengers along the Capital Beltway, the Baltimore Beltway, Interstate 95 north and south of Baltimore and U.S. 50 between Washington and Annapolis.
NEWS
March 22, 2013
I smiled when I read Susan Reimer 's column about locking one's car doors to prevent thieves from stealing valuables from inside ("Hey Annapolis car owners: Lock it up!" March 7). It seemed so small-town 1950s America, so different from the reality of people who have to park their cars in Baltimore, where locking your car door is completely irrelevant. Here, thieves will smash your side windows and grab your personal items - even out of the glove box, where they know you've stashed your GPS - in less time than it takes to open an unlocked door.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
State and federal transportation officials studying the replacement of an aged rail tunnel beneath Baltimore are opening the discussion to local residents and Amtrak and MARC commuters. The 1.4-mile Baltimore & Potomac Tunnel, considered a key bottleneck for commuter and freight traffic up and down the nation's busy Northeast Corridor, is 141 years old and a curvy, tight fit for today's modern trains — limiting their capacity and reducing their speed. The aging tunnel cuts beneath the Sandtown-Winchester, Upton and Bolton Hill neighborhoods of west and central Baltimore, between the West Baltimore MARC Station and Baltimore's Penn Station.
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
When app developer Mindgrub Technologies outgrew its space for the umpteenth time, CEO Todd Marks did what any good tech entrepreneur would do - he turned to Google. An analysis of his employees' commutes using Google Maps and Google Earth led Marks to Locust Point, and the former Phillips Seafood headquarters. Mindgrub set up shop there three weeks ago and is set to get an official welcome from Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and a group of city small business leaders Wednesday. "We're really growing fast and we need to attract a lot of talent," Marks said, adding that many of the young professionals Mindgrub is seeking to recruit already live in the city and want to stay there.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2014
A man was struck and killed by a train in Prince George's County on Friday afternoon, disrupting Amtrak and MARC service along the busy Baltimore-Washington corridor, officials said. MARC service was halted from about 2:30 p.m. until shortly after 5 p.m. along the Penn Line and Amtrak service was shut down from Washington all the way to Philadelphia, said Craig Schulz, an Amtrak spokesman. "Just because of the volume of trains, we're getting full in Baltimore and there's no where to go in Wilmington, so we're holding in Philadelphia where we have more room," Schulz said.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, Kevin Rector and Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2014
A nearly 120-year-old retaining wall that has troubled Charles Village residents for decades collapsed Wednesday amid a month's worth of rain, dumping street lights, sidewalks and half a dozen cars onto the CSX rail tracks below. No injuries were reported. City officials evacuated 19 adjacent homes along East 26th Street and urged residents to avoid the area in case of lingering instability. The landslide halted CSX rail traffic through what is a main artery to the port of Baltimore.
NEWS
April 29, 2014
The continued existence of Maryland's death row a year after the General Assembly abolished capital punishment was brought into question by two events this month, one obvious and one less so. The first is the death, apparently of natural causes, of one of the five inmates put in limbo after the death penalty repeal, John Booth-el. As a result, advocates are renewing their questions about whether it would be appropriate for Maryland to go forward with executions now that the legislature has found the death penalty inappropriate.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
Nearly six months of lane closures and heavy rush-hour congestion on Russell Street in South Baltimore have come to an end. Crews installing new Baltimore Gas & Electric Co. lines beneath the busy north-south corridor, south of M&T Bank Stadium and near the rising Horseshoe Baltimore Casino, completed the "bulk" of their work Tuesday night, said Jim Harkness, the city's traffic chief. The work, which began in October and was necessitated by the development of the casino site, rerouted a stretch of BGE lines from Warner Street to Russell Street, via Worchester and Haines streets.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | michael.dresser@baltsun.com | March 3, 2010
Commuters who drive to downtown Baltimore from the south face two weeks of excruciating backups as maintenance work on a pipeline forces the closing of one of the two main ramps leading from Interstate 95 to the heart of the city. The Maryland Transportation Authority will close the Exit 52 ramp to Russell Street from northbound I-95 from about 9 p.m. Saturday through 6 a.m. March 20. Most commuters who normally use that ramp will be squeezed onto the Exit 53 ramp to Interstate 395 - already the scene of backups that sometimes stretch to the Beltway.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,Sun Staff Writer | September 11, 1995
Brian O'Donnell sits waiting in his sleek, white Ford Mustang. Ten minutes go by, then 20, and almost a half-hour later the Towson State University student spots her. She's walking through the parking garage's third-level door wearing a white T-shirt adorned with green lizards.With a triumphant "YES!" Mr. O'Donnell shifts the Mustang into gear, creeping behind her, ready to make his move. But he's not interested in striking up a conversation with her -- he wants something more valuable.Her parking space.
NEWS
By Sean Welsh, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2014
White could be the new green this St. Patrick's Day. A winter weather system moving into the Mid-Atlantic brought the potential of up to six inches of snow, beginning just in time for the Monday commute. A winter storm warning was in effect for Anne Arundel, Howard and southern Baltimore counties, as well as points south, through 2 p.m. Monday. A winter weather advisory was in effect for Carroll, Frederick, Harford and northern Baltimore counties, also through 2 p.m. The National Weather Service called for three to six inches of accumulation under the storm warning, and two to five inches in those areas covered by the advisory.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2014
The Baltimore region had the 18 t h worst traffic in the country in 2013, according to the latest annual survey by INRIX, a leader in traffic data collection. The average commuter spent 27 hours in traffic in 2013, which is an hour more than in 2012, when Baltimore's traffic was considered the 17 t h worst in the nation, INRIX found. Commuters in Washington, which ranked 10 t h , wasted 40 hours in 2013, one hour less than in 2012. Washington was the only city that had a decrease in the year-over-year average number of hours wasted.
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