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NEWS
December 28, 2010
David F. Tufaro's op-ed, "A reform agenda for Baltimore's next mayor" (Dec. 27), is thoughtful and constructive. However, what it does not recognize is that Baltimore has been a bankrupt city for the past 40 to 45 years — its annual budget balanced because of federal and state subsidies. I submit that Baltimore cannot substantially reduce the property tax rate without a new revenue tax to take its place. During the past 50 years, the population of Baltimore City has diminished from 960,000 to 630,000, the middle class having in effect voted with their feet by moving to the surrounding prosperous and lower-taxed counties.
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2012
Talk in Congress of letting the District of Columbia tax commuters is getting a cool reception in Maryland. Officials in Washington say such a measure could raise $1.2 billion in new revenue - enough to fund nearly an eighth of the district's $9.65 billion operating budget. But it would cost Maryland - with nearly 250,000 commuters, the district's largest source of workers - hundreds millions of dollars. "I'm vehemently against it," said Rep.Elijah E. Cummings, a Baltimore Democrat who represents thousands who work in Washington.
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2012
Talk in Congress of letting the District of Columbia tax commuters is getting a cool reception in Maryland. Officials in Washington say such a measure could raise $1.2 billion in new revenue - enough to fund nearly an eighth of the district's $9.65 billion operating budget. But it would cost Maryland - with nearly 250,000 commuters, the district's largest source of workers - hundreds millions of dollars. "I'm vehemently against it," said Rep.Elijah E. Cummings, a Baltimore Democrat who represents thousands who work in Washington.
NEWS
February 3, 2012
So why not a city wage tax - also known as a commuter tax? I call Baltimore my home and wouldn't live anywhere else. A lifetime ago, when I was but a wee lass, I lived and worked in Philadelphia. If you worked in the city limits, you paid a city wage tax. So all those people who got in their cars at the end of the work day and drove off to their bucolic life somewhere else had to pay for the privilege of having great, high-paying job within the city limits. Mayor, it seems like a no-brainer to me. Every day, a literal river of cars drives out of our fair city in every direction headed for a less expensive, seemingly better lifestyle and they take their wage taxes with them.
NEWS
By John Fritze and Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | December 25, 2011
Commuter advocates and Maryland lawmakers say they will fight to renew an expiring tax credit that benefits mass-transit users, including MARC riders. Current federal law allows commuters to withhold up to $230 in pre-tax income each month that can be used to pay for train and bus fares, but the cap will fall to $125 a month next year because Congress didn't renew the more generous break. The difference means a 22 percent increase in commuting costs for some, which can translate into hundreds of dollars a year.
NEWS
July 2, 1999
IT'S UNDERSTANDABLE if some city residents -- and politicians -- find the notion of a commuter tax appealing. The idea of placing the burden of increased taxes on someone else is attractive. That's one reason taxes on hotel rooms and rental cars -- in other words, on visitors -- are imposed in some places with relatively little local uproar.A commuter tax, though, could have a devastating effect on Baltimore's attempts to retain and attract employers. It could also alienate the city's neighbors at a time when more -- not less -- cooperation is needed.
NEWS
June 10, 1993
Don't worry about tax fairness, just be happy you have jobs That was state Comptroller Louis L. Goldstein's message to Marylanders who work in Delaware and pay income taxes there.Delaware, which would lose a net $20 million in income tax from Marylanders, has no interest in a tax reciprocity agreement that would allow workers to pay taxes only in the state where they live. As Maryland lacks any legal clout, Delaware has no incentive to even discuss it.Cecil County has pressed unsuccessfully for a county tax authority to remedy the issue, on behalf of 11,000 county residents (out of nearly 18,000 Marylanders)
NEWS
December 9, 1992
Now that the City Council has killed the piggyback income tax increase proposal, it is interesting to see whether Baltimore City politicians will seriously begin lobbying for a commuter tax.The specter of such a tax has often been raised in the past. Just last year the Greater Baltimore Committee reported that nearly 200,000 people commute into the city every day, taking with them $112.5 million a year in income tax revenues when they return to the suburbs. If those people could be taxed according to their work place jurisdiction rather than domicile, what a difference that would make in the city's fortunes, goes the refrain.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | January 14, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- A proposal to prop up Baltimore by sending more income tax revenue the city's way appeared in deep trouble last night."I wouldn't say it is dead [but] I would say it is ailing," conceded Sen. John A. Pica Jr., D-Baltimore.Mr. Pica is a sponsor of the plan, also pushed by Gov. William Donald Schaefer, to redistribute some local piggyback income tax revenue to the jurisdiction in which it's earned, instead of where the taxpayer lives.Before the governor's aides could translate the idea into legislation, it drew fire from Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr., D-Prince George's.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Evening Sun Staff | January 14, 1992
Some call it a piggyback tax for the city. Others call it a commuter tax. Either way, a plan to help Baltimore capture some income tax revenue from the people who work there is in deep trouble."
NEWS
By John Fritze and Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | December 25, 2011
Commuter advocates and Maryland lawmakers say they will fight to renew an expiring tax credit that benefits mass-transit users, including MARC riders. Current federal law allows commuters to withhold up to $230 in pre-tax income each month that can be used to pay for train and bus fares, but the cap will fall to $125 a month next year because Congress didn't renew the more generous break. The difference means a 22 percent increase in commuting costs for some, which can translate into hundreds of dollars a year.
NEWS
December 28, 2010
David F. Tufaro's op-ed, "A reform agenda for Baltimore's next mayor" (Dec. 27), is thoughtful and constructive. However, what it does not recognize is that Baltimore has been a bankrupt city for the past 40 to 45 years — its annual budget balanced because of federal and state subsidies. I submit that Baltimore cannot substantially reduce the property tax rate without a new revenue tax to take its place. During the past 50 years, the population of Baltimore City has diminished from 960,000 to 630,000, the middle class having in effect voted with their feet by moving to the surrounding prosperous and lower-taxed counties.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2010
After months of delays caused by problems in the delivery of buses, Baltimore will launch the second of three planned lines for its free Charm City Circulator shuttle service Monday. The new north-south Purple Route will run downtown from Ostend Street in South Baltimore to Penn Station, operating at 10-minute intervals. The line will intersect at Pratt and Lombard streets with the circulator's east-west Orange Route, which began service between Harbor East and the Hollins Market in January.
NEWS
By ERIC SIEGEL | February 22, 2007
Back in the early 1990s, Baltimore leaders set a long-term goal: to have the city's property tax rate be no more than 150 percent that of Baltimore County. I was reminded of that goal last week, when Mayor Sheila Dixon announced a task force to recommend property tax relief, as many residents are reeling from soaring assessments. The city, of course, has never come close to reaching its goal. Although the numbers and calculations have changed (rates are now based on 100 percent of assessed value, as opposed to 40 percent 15 years ago)
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2004
IT HAS become almost a Baltimore rite of spring. As winter fades, the city administration presents its budget for the new fiscal year that begins July 1 - often accompanied by dire forecasts of the draconian cuts in services that will be required unless new sources of revenue are found. This year is no exception. Mayor Martin O'Malley says he will have to lay off more than 500 city workers unless he can find ways to generate more money. He proposes to do just that by imposing an energy tax on nonprofit groups, putting a new tax on cell phones or raising the limit on tax increases for homes, measures that are drawing howls of protest from many of those who would be affected.
NEWS
September 13, 2002
Ex-parks chief has no place on city payroll Fired months ago after less than two years on the job, former city parks director Marvin F. Billups Jr. remains on the city payroll and continues living rent-free in city-owned housing, with the blessing of Mayor Martin O'Malley ("Ex-parks chief, fired in July, still on city payroll," Sept. 11). The mayor says it's only right to give the guy time to find a new job. Clearly, the mayor has never worked in the private sector. Typically, when an employee is terminated for cause, he or she receives one week's pay per year worked, unless another agreement has been made.
NEWS
August 2, 1999
Elected leaders are engaged, accountable on transportationI am writing in response to The Sun's article "Billions in transit funding put at risk" (July 27) and a related editorial "AWOL on transportation" (July 28).The federal government has expressly given local elected leaders the right to empower designees to sit on transportation planning committees.I delegate qualified people to represent and report to me on a variety of important matters, including the regional Transportation Steering Committee (TSC)
NEWS
February 3, 2012
So why not a city wage tax - also known as a commuter tax? I call Baltimore my home and wouldn't live anywhere else. A lifetime ago, when I was but a wee lass, I lived and worked in Philadelphia. If you worked in the city limits, you paid a city wage tax. So all those people who got in their cars at the end of the work day and drove off to their bucolic life somewhere else had to pay for the privilege of having great, high-paying job within the city limits. Mayor, it seems like a no-brainer to me. Every day, a literal river of cars drives out of our fair city in every direction headed for a less expensive, seemingly better lifestyle and they take their wage taxes with them.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | September 5, 2002
LISTEN CAREFULLY over the next two months to see if gubernatorial candidates Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend and U.S. Rep. Robert L. Ehrlich take a position on tax changes that could benefit Baltimore. Changes like a small commuter tax on Marylanders who work outside the jurisdiction where they live. Or a modest regional sales tax to support cultural institutions and provide tax relief to poor communities. The former could mean about $32 million for the city's coffers; the latter measure, more than twice that amount.
NEWS
September 10, 1999
The following are edited excerpts of the responses by Republican candidates for mayor of Baltimore to a Sun questionnaire. The Democratic candidates' responses appeared earlier this week.Carl M. AdairOn mayoral style and role model: I have observed several former mayors of Baltimore and have learned from each. My priority will be education: improve classroom instruction, classroom behavior, praising the good students and teachers. I will also reduce crime by using education and technical training of students.
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