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NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff writer | March 24, 1991
They crowded the board room for English teacher Dottie Farley. She had come to appeal an educator's decision to remove "Gilgamesh," considered the world's oldest surviving work of fiction, from the world literature classes of Carroll high schools.Teachers and students, some carrying copies of the epic poem, presented the school board withpetitions asking that Herbert Mason's translation of "The Epic of Gilgamesh" not be withdrawn from the elective course, usually taken by upperclassmen.Others, including parents, administrators and members of the Carroll County Education Association, which represents 1,300 teachers, came to listen to the debate over censorship and community standards --stemming from a parent's complaint about a reference to oral sex in the book.
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FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | July 8, 2003
I never thought I would live to see the day when gay marriage would be considered a good thing by those who believe in the importance to society of family stability. I am happy to know that it looks like I made it. The recent U.S. Supreme Court decision that struck down sodomy laws as an invasion of privacy and a weapon of harassment produced a lot of talk. Some of it was predictable doomsday bluster: This decision will certainly also require the legalization of polygamy, incest, pedophilia and bestiality.
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NEWS
October 5, 1990
We have heard the lyrics of the rap group 2 Live Crew's album, "As Nasty as They Wanna Be," and they are indeed disgusting, appalling and, yes, even obscene. But obscene or not, we reject the idea that anyone, anywhere, should be prosecuted and convicted for writing songs, singing songs, selling records -- or doing anything else that falls within the ambit of the freedom to speak or perform.This week in Florida, a record store owner was convicted, and faces a jail term, for selling 2 Live Crew's records.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | May 13, 2003
WAL-MART, which sells more magazines than any other retail chain, is discontinuing the sale of a trio of slightly raunchy men's publications. Maxim, Stuff and FHM, American versions of so-called "lad" magazines from Britain, will be banished from Wal-Mart shelves - not just in communities that objected to their soft-porn content, but from every Wal-Mart in every community in the country. This is just the latest bit of cultural tinkering by the mega-retailer, a huge force in American pop-culture consumption.
NEWS
By Fort lauderdale News and Sun-Sentinel | October 4, 1990
Depending on who is asked, the conviction of a Florida record-store owner for selling an obscene record is either the death of the First Amendment, a victory for anti-pornography forces, or something in between."
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN | October 27, 1990
AFTER A JURY in Florida concluded that 2 Live Crew's famous act was not obscene, civil libertarian lawyer Alan Dershowitz said he agreed with the result but that it should not be up to jurors in the first place. The First Amendment absolutely protects such expression, and courts have no right to review it, he said.I had been reading up on the history of the Supreme Court's grappling with the issue of obscenity, and I came across a quote from Professor Dershowitz in the wake of the court's 1973 decision that gave us our current definition of obscenity and stated that it is okay to ban it. This decision restated an older one. What was new in it was that "community" rather than "national" standards could be applied to determine if something was obscene.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | May 13, 2003
WAL-MART, which sells more magazines than any other retail chain, is discontinuing the sale of a trio of slightly raunchy men's publications. Maxim, Stuff and FHM, American versions of so-called "lad" magazines from Britain, will be banished from Wal-Mart shelves - not just in communities that objected to their soft-porn content, but from every Wal-Mart in every community in the country. This is just the latest bit of cultural tinkering by the mega-retailer, a huge force in American pop-culture consumption.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | July 8, 2003
I never thought I would live to see the day when gay marriage would be considered a good thing by those who believe in the importance to society of family stability. I am happy to know that it looks like I made it. The recent U.S. Supreme Court decision that struck down sodomy laws as an invasion of privacy and a weapon of harassment produced a lot of talk. Some of it was predictable doomsday bluster: This decision will certainly also require the legalization of polygamy, incest, pedophilia and bestiality.
NEWS
January 4, 1994
Howard Stern deserves right to free speechI write as a loyal fan, concerned citizen and as a free-lance research paralegal in support of Howard Stern's right to free speech.I recently took the day off and visited the Federal Communications Commission in Washington to see and read what the public has written about Mr. Stern and what law the FCC is relying on to levy fines on Mr. Stern and his parent company.The tone of Mr. Stern's detractors is most alarming. The letters do not give a persuasive argument against Mr. Stern's right of free speech.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | November 15, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Dan Quayle took on "Murphy Brown" about single motherhood. William Bennett battled Time Warner over gangsta rap. Each had limited success.Now, the 900-pound gorilla of retail, Wal-Mart, is making a substantial contribution to a cleaner (or at least less polluted) entertainment environment.The huge retail chain has decided to "edit" some of the raunchier lyrics and art work from its stock of compact disc recordings. Since it accounts for 52 million of the 615 million CDs sold in the United States, Wal-Mart's decision packs an Evander Holyfield-style punch.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | November 15, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Dan Quayle took on "Murphy Brown" about single motherhood. William Bennett battled Time Warner over gangsta rap. Each had limited success.Now, the 900-pound gorilla of retail, Wal-Mart, is making a substantial contribution to a cleaner (or at least less polluted) entertainment environment.The huge retail chain has decided to "edit" some of the raunchier lyrics and art work from its stock of compact disc recordings. Since it accounts for 52 million of the 615 million CDs sold in the United States, Wal-Mart's decision packs an Evander Holyfield-style punch.
NEWS
January 4, 1994
Howard Stern deserves right to free speechI write as a loyal fan, concerned citizen and as a free-lance research paralegal in support of Howard Stern's right to free speech.I recently took the day off and visited the Federal Communications Commission in Washington to see and read what the public has written about Mr. Stern and what law the FCC is relying on to levy fines on Mr. Stern and his parent company.The tone of Mr. Stern's detractors is most alarming. The letters do not give a persuasive argument against Mr. Stern's right of free speech.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff writer | March 24, 1991
They crowded the board room for English teacher Dottie Farley. She had come to appeal an educator's decision to remove "Gilgamesh," considered the world's oldest surviving work of fiction, from the world literature classes of Carroll high schools.Teachers and students, some carrying copies of the epic poem, presented the school board withpetitions asking that Herbert Mason's translation of "The Epic of Gilgamesh" not be withdrawn from the elective course, usually taken by upperclassmen.Others, including parents, administrators and members of the Carroll County Education Association, which represents 1,300 teachers, came to listen to the debate over censorship and community standards --stemming from a parent's complaint about a reference to oral sex in the book.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN | October 27, 1990
AFTER A JURY in Florida concluded that 2 Live Crew's famous act was not obscene, civil libertarian lawyer Alan Dershowitz said he agreed with the result but that it should not be up to jurors in the first place. The First Amendment absolutely protects such expression, and courts have no right to review it, he said.I had been reading up on the history of the Supreme Court's grappling with the issue of obscenity, and I came across a quote from Professor Dershowitz in the wake of the court's 1973 decision that gave us our current definition of obscenity and stated that it is okay to ban it. This decision restated an older one. What was new in it was that "community" rather than "national" standards could be applied to determine if something was obscene.
NEWS
October 5, 1990
We have heard the lyrics of the rap group 2 Live Crew's album, "As Nasty as They Wanna Be," and they are indeed disgusting, appalling and, yes, even obscene. But obscene or not, we reject the idea that anyone, anywhere, should be prosecuted and convicted for writing songs, singing songs, selling records -- or doing anything else that falls within the ambit of the freedom to speak or perform.This week in Florida, a record store owner was convicted, and faces a jail term, for selling 2 Live Crew's records.
NEWS
By Fort lauderdale News and Sun-Sentinel | October 4, 1990
Depending on who is asked, the conviction of a Florida record-store owner for selling an obscene record is either the death of the First Amendment, a victory for anti-pornography forces, or something in between."
NEWS
December 18, 2005
Battling Turf Valley `development creep' Running roughshod over the public welfare seems to be the modus operandi of the Mangione family as they try to expand the development of Turf Valley and operate the Turf Valley Resort. Their approach to the proposed development has been deceptive, doling out incremental phases that fly under the radar of government oversight agencies as part of their master plan for "development creep." This cavalier attitude extends to the way the nearby Turf Valley Resort ignores community standards.
NEWS
By Jeffrey Rosen | June 28, 1996
WASHINGTON -- On June 11, three judges in Philadelphia struck down parts of the Communications Decency Act. The decision, ACLU v. Reno, is being justly celebrated as an occasion for dancing in the chat rooms. The three judges understood how the old First Amendment battles are being overtaken by new technologies; and in an endearingly self-dramatizing touch, they had their separate opinions distributed on floppy disks.But for all their sophistication about the technical difficulties of regulating free speech in cyberspace, the judges were forced by the Supreme Court's archaic obscenity doctrine to rely on an implausible premise: that it's possible to distinguish obscenity (which can be banned)
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