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By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | March 9, 2014
More than a decade before thousands rallied outside the State House in Annapolis for adequate school facilities for the city's children, several dozen residents met in a school lunchroom in Northeast Baltimore to lay the groundwork for building just one new school in their community. The campaign for a new building in Waverly began in 2003 when the school board decided to expand the elementary school to serve middle school students as well. Eventually, city officials promised, those students would move into a new building to rival the high-performing Roland Park Middle, which they would have attended.
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NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | March 9, 2014
More than a decade before thousands rallied outside the State House in Annapolis for adequate school facilities for the city's children, several dozen residents met in a school lunchroom in Northeast Baltimore to lay the groundwork for building just one new school in their community. The campaign for a new building in Waverly began in 2003 when the school board decided to expand the elementary school to serve middle school students as well. Eventually, city officials promised, those students would move into a new building to rival the high-performing Roland Park Middle, which they would have attended.
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NEWS
April 7, 1991
Temple Isaiah, which in mid-March announced plans to break away fromthe Howard County Jewish Community School and form its own school, has changed plans and is recommending that its families continue to enroll their children in the community school for at least another year.The school's enrollment includes 400 students from Temple Isaiah -- approximately two-thirds of the student body.Although Temple Isaiah President Lester Feldman would not explainwhy the split was being considered when interviewed last month, he issued a letter to parents two weeks ago referring to concerns by the Temple's school board over a "lack of religious orientation in our children's education."
NEWS
December 3, 2013
Your report about Baltimore City foster care youth sent to earn high school diplomas at Philadelphia's Crooked Places Christian academy "made straight" a dilemma that the City Council's Education Committee and its partners have long anticipated and struggled to resolve ( "Baltimore foster care youths get diploma in a day in Philadelphia," Nov. 23). As the state phases in a law requiring either a diploma or school attendance until age 18, hundreds of our older students lack flexible alternatives for graduating from high school - alternatives that accommodate and respect their adult roles as parents, family providers, sibling caregivers and employees.
NEWS
By Rona Hirsch and Rona Hirsch,Staff writer | March 24, 1991
In a move threatening the vitality of the Howard County Jewish Community School, Temple Isaiah announced last week that it plans to breakaway to form its own school in September."
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | December 15, 1998
You have your drive-through fast food, your drive-in movies and your drive-up windows at your local bank.Now a Baltimore synagogue and day school is offering a menorah lighting for the carpool set.Beth Tfiloh Congregation and Community School held its first "Carpool Candle-lighting Ceremony" yesterday as it dedicated a 9-foot-tall menorah, next to the school's parking lot off Old Court Road in Pikesville, on the second evening of Hanukkah.The eight days of Hanukkah celebrate the victory of a band of Jewish fighters, the Maccabees, who in 165 B.C. recaptured the Temple in Jerusalem from Syrian-Greek invaders.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Sun Staff Writer | August 29, 1995
It began as an experimental school where children of diverse Jewish perspectives could learn about their culture and traditions. Now the Howard County Jewish Community School is ready to begin its 24th year in Columbia's Oakland Mills village.But the school has seen enrollment plummet from a high of 600 four years ago to about 150 this year -- a decline partly traceable to competition from four other Jewish schools in the county, two formed by congregations that originally founded the Jewish Community School.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | November 28, 1996
In one of the biggest land deals in Baltimore, the Johns Hopkins University won approval yesterday to buy the old Eastern High School building and within the next 20 years redevelop the unoccupied 26-acre site to include businesses, a private school and university offices.The action by the Board of Estimates was the last step in the $2.6 million land deal brokered by Baltimore Development Corp. officials. They have been in negotiations since July 1995, when the city selected the university to develop the site, which is across from Memorial Stadium.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,SUN REPORTER | January 15, 2007
Barclay Elementary/Middle School in Baltimore has received one of 11 grants awarded to schools throughout the United States and Canada to promote students' overall health. The $10,000 grants were awarded by the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, an international group that stresses education of the "whole child." It urges schools to address students' physical, mental and emotional needs, as well as their academic development. Barclay plans to use the money to expand counseling to students with behavior problems and to form support groups for parents to discuss how they can improve their children's behavior at home.
NEWS
October 16, 2012
Elev8 Baltimore, an after-school program that has been working with schools in East Baltimore, was honored Tuesday by the U.S. Department of Education, according to a release.  The organization, was one of 24 initiatives named as Together for Tomorrow Challenge Champions. This first-time award was given to schools, educational programs and organizations that met Together for Tomorrow School Improvement Challenge's criteria for community school models that propel improvement in low-performing schools.
NEWS
November 4, 2013
As Dan Rodricks ' recent column makes clear, we have a wonderful opportunity to help transform the city with the new $1.1 billion construction and renovation funding for Baltimore City's schools ( "Using the schools as leverage," Oct. 31). To do that, we should ensure that the dozens of new and rebuilt schools now being planned indeed become neighborhood hubs and true community schools. Community schools bring in partner organizations to work with staff to provide additional programming and services for students and their families.
NEWS
By Jon Meoli, Baltimore Sun Media Group | September 3, 2013
School officials have vowed they would include parents and stakeholders in discussions on finding a way to accommodate the burgeoning elementary school-aged student population in central Baltimore County. They appear to be keeping their word, demonstrated by a recent meeting during which they proposed an outside-the-box proposal involving in combination Cromwell Valley Elementary, Halstead Academy and the old Loch Raven Elementary building. "I think the superintendent (Dallas Dance)
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2013
The residents and redevelopers of East Baltimore agree that the $42 million school taking shape on 7 acres along Ashland Avenue symbolizes hope for the community. But they disagree about which children should be able to attend the much-heralded new school. The long-planned Elmer A. Henderson School, to be operated by Johns Hopkins and Morgan State universities, was designed to be a neighborhood anchor and a magnet for new residents. Known as Henderson-Hopkins, the campus is part of the East Baltimore Development Inc. plan that also calls for more than 1,500 homes and 1.7 million square feet of laboratory, office and retail space next to the Hopkins hospital complex.
NEWS
October 16, 2012
Elev8 Baltimore, an after-school program that has been working with schools in East Baltimore, was honored Tuesday by the U.S. Department of Education, according to a release.  The organization, was one of 24 initiatives named as Together for Tomorrow Challenge Champions. This first-time award was given to schools, educational programs and organizations that met Together for Tomorrow School Improvement Challenge's criteria for community school models that propel improvement in low-performing schools.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2012
Hundreds of Baltimore students and residents have had their high school completions hanging in limbo since the state transferred the General Education Development responsibilities to a new department, according to city and adult education officials. As a consequence, a program that was designed to fast-track a high school diploma for teens and adults is in some cases preventing them from having access to jobs and college enrollment, officials and students say. On Thursday, the City Council will hold a hearing to discuss the issues that city GED seekers have faced, such as an increase in wait times, since the service was moved from the state education department to the labor department in 2009.
NEWS
By Christina L. Schoppert | September 30, 2012
I remember the faded photograph my aunt kept in a place of honor in her home. My grandfather was 5, sitting atop a pony at the corner of North Patterson Park and Ashland avenues. He wore a petticoat and cap. It was about 1925. I remember the stories about "Pop" Schoppert, my grandfather's father, making the trip from West Virginia to Baltimore to seek a better life. The trunk with which he traveled sits in the basement of my parents' house. I remember, as a child, examining it, imagining that journey.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,liz.bowie@baltsun.com | August 31, 2009
When she was in elementary school, Maria Parris fell behind two grades, and since then has always felt awkward being so much older than her classmates. This year she is getting a chance to catch up in one of Baltimore's three new accelerator schools, which will give her a concentrated version of high school in two years. "I am just glad I am here to get put in my right grade and graduate on time," said Parris, who is attending the Baltimore Community School. The 15-year-old began to like school after she moved in with her grandmother and her home life stabilized during middle school.
NEWS
August 3, 2001
St. John's Baptist yard sale tomorrow to benefit needy kids St. John's Baptist Church, 8910 Old Annapolis Road, Columbia, will sponsor a yard sale from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. tomorrow. Proceeds will help purchase school supplies and backpacks for needy children. The sale is sponsored by the church's Golden Hearts Senior Ministry. To donate clothing or housewares in good condition: Sister Frances Estes, 410-381-5229. The church will hold a worship service at 10:45 a.m. Aug. 12 and will hold its annual picnic after the service, about 12:30 p.m., on the new church grounds, 2865 Marriottsville Road, Ellicott City.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2011
A $60,000 federal grant announced Thursday will allow the South Baltimore neighborhood of Cherry Hill to grow several new community gardens. Three-quarters of the U.S. Department of Agriculture money will be divided among community groups that will create and run the gardens, said grant administrator Nadine Braunstein, an assistant professor in Towson University's College of Health Professions. The remaining $15,000 will go to Towson to manage the program, she said. "Why were we inspired to do this in Cherry Hill?
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