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By M. Dion Thompson | December 3, 1991
After nearly two years and numerous delays, two officers of a failed Maryland thrift went on trial yesterday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore on charges of conspiracy, and mail and wire fraud -- actions federal prosecutors allege led to the collapse of Community Savings and Loan.The defendants, Clayton C. McCuistion and Barbara A. McKinney, are two of three people indicted in the case. The alleged mastermind, Tom J. Billman, fled the country in 1985, taking with him millions of dollars, prosecutors said.
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NEWS
By John J. Boronow and Steven S. Sharfstein | December 29, 2013
Treatment refusal occurs in medical/surgical settings across the world every day: a child with leukemia resisting a painful bone-marrow biopsy, an elderly man with Alzheimer's fighting his medication, a woman awakening from a coma and demanding release. And in most instances, "society" - as represented by the family, the health care providers and our legal institutions - has well-established, ethical, effective and efficient mechanisms for enabling the treatment to proceed. But that same society frequently fails people with severe mental illness who also have a related affliction known as "anosognosia" - essentially the inability to recognize one's own illness, however obvious it may be to everyone else.
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NEWS
By Gary Cohn and Marcia Myers and Gary Cohn and Marcia Myers,Staff Writers | December 16, 1993
A federal magistrate yesterday shot down a proposal to release longtime fugitive Tom J. Billman from jail while he awaits trial on looting his Bethesda savings and loan of $28 million.U.S. Magistrate Judge Daniel E. Klein Jr. turned down the request after Assistant U.S. Attorney Barbara S. Sale called Mr. Billman "the top dog" in the failure of his thrift and cautioned that he "posed a classic risk of flight.""If ever there was a flight risk, this case is it," Ms. Sale said. "This is not a man for the court to take a chance on."
NEWS
By HERBERT H. TOLER JR | May 21, 1995
The alienation of African-American men from the churches of their communities is perhaps the single greatest tragedy facing black America."While 75 percent of the mosque is male, 75 percent of the black church is female," laments Jawanza Kunjufu, author of "Adam Where Are You?: Why Most Black Men Don't Go to Church." It wasn't always so: In earlier generations, black men were much more involved in the church, and their religious faith bolstered their commitment to families and neighborhoods.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,Staff Writer | February 15, 1994
Valentine's Day was cruel to Tom J. Billman.Sitting not five feet from him in U.S. District Court in Baltimore yesterday was the blond Danish woman who had been his companion in Europe for several months of 1989 -- a time when prosecutors say he lived lavishly as a fugitive in Spain on $22 million taken from his failed Bethesda savings and loan.Kaja Olsen's sketch of that precarious life opened the second week of Mr. Billman's trial on federal mail fraud and wire fraud charges.For more than 30 minutes, Ms. Olsen described their relationship and travels, which began in the summer of 1989.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Sun Staff Writer | June 23, 1994
Savings and loan swindler Tom J. Billman had been on the lam for nearly four years when the fax sent from Paris by FBI agents landed in Baltimore. Federal prosecutors Barbara S. Sale and Joyce McDonald took one look at the handwriting samples on the document and knew the chase would soon be over."
BUSINESS
July 10, 1993
Sears may take Visa, MasterCardSears, Roebuck and Co. is close to accepting Visa and MasterCard at its stores, just days after spinning off the Discover credit-card business it created.Sears said it has reached a tentative agreement with First Financial Management Corp. in Atlanta to handle purchases made with Visa and MasterCard.Judge to OK plans for O&Y boardA bankruptcy judge said he intends to approve plans for a new board for Olympia & York (U.S.A.), an important step toward reviving the developer's much-delayed debt restructuring talks.
NEWS
By Gary Cohn and Marcia Myers and Gary Cohn and Marcia Myers,Staff Writers | December 15, 1993
Tom J. Billman, accused of looting his Maryland savings and loan of $28 million, was escorted here from a Paris jail yesterday, ending a lengthy international manhunt and extradition battle.Mr. Billman disappeared in December 1988 and lived grandly overseas for a time before being captured at his Paris apartment in March while posing as a champagne entrepreneur named John Rink.At 5:08 p.m. yesterday, Mr. Billman, in a dark suit, white shirt and handcuffs, set foot on Maryland soil for the first time in five years.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Marcia Myers and Melody Simmons and Marcia Myers,Sun Staff Writers | June 21, 1994
Saying society is fed up with savings and loan directors who have stolen from their depositors, U.S. District Court Judge J. Frederick Motz sentenced convicted financier Tom J. Billman today to 40 years in prison and ordered him to pay $25 million restitution.Billman, who according to court documents was expecting a sentence of only two years for defrauding about 20,000 depositors of $28 million, sat with slumped shoulders as Judge Motz issued the sentence."I don't think you can be rehabilitated," Judge Motz told Billman, referring to recent revelations that the former chairman of Community Savings & Loan of Bethesda was manipulating millions of dollars from his cell in the City Jail.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | April 22, 1992
Two former Community Savings and Loan officials were acquitted yesterday of charges they defrauded depositors of millions of dollars to prop up a mortgage company and line their own pockets.After a four-month trial in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, Chief Judge Walter E. Black Jr. returned the innocent verdicts for Clayton C. McCuistion, 49, the thrift's former president, and Barbara A. McKinney, 41, a former Community director and one-time vice president and legal counsel of its defunct holding company.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Tanya Jones and Marcia Myers and Tanya Jones,Sun Staff Writers | October 28, 1994
Police in Austria say they have unearthed about $4 million more hidden by Maryland savings and loan swindler Tom J. Billman, who went to prison in June claiming to be broke and asking taxpayers to pay his legal fees.The multimillion-dollar hoard, dispersed among several bank accounts, came to light recently during an investigation by police in Vienna. Austrian police were drawn into the case last spring after a courier for Billman was arrested while attempting to make a $5 million transaction that the former executive had ordered from his jail cell.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Sun Staff Writer | June 23, 1994
Savings and loan swindler Tom J. Billman had been on the lam for nearly four years when the fax sent from Paris by FBI agents landed in Baltimore. Federal prosecutors Barbara S. Sale and Joyce McDonald took one look at the handwriting samples on the document and knew the chase would soon be over."
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Marcia Myers and Melody Simmons and Marcia Myers,Sun Staff Writers | June 21, 1994
Saying society is fed up with savings and loan directors who have stolen from their depositors, U.S. District Court Judge J. Frederick Motz sentenced convicted financier Tom J. Billman today to 40 years in prison and ordered him to pay $25 million restitution.Billman, who according to court documents was expecting a sentence of only two years for defrauding about 20,000 depositors of $28 million, sat with slumped shoulders as Judge Motz issued the sentence."I don't think you can be rehabilitated," Judge Motz told Billman, referring to recent revelations that the former chairman of Community Savings & Loan of Bethesda was manipulating millions of dollars from his cell in the City Jail.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,Staff Writer | February 15, 1994
Valentine's Day was cruel to Tom J. Billman.Sitting not five feet from him in U.S. District Court in Baltimore yesterday was the blond Danish woman who had been his companion in Europe for several months of 1989 -- a time when prosecutors say he lived lavishly as a fugitive in Spain on $22 million taken from his failed Bethesda savings and loan.Kaja Olsen's sketch of that precarious life opened the second week of Mr. Billman's trial on federal mail fraud and wire fraud charges.For more than 30 minutes, Ms. Olsen described their relationship and travels, which began in the summer of 1989.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,Sun Staff Writer | February 8, 1994
Lawyers for Tom J. Billman yesterday characterized him as a skilled executive who bought a sickly Maryland savings and loan in 1982 and steered it toward financial recovery -- only to be thwarted by the panic of the 1980s S&L scandals.That defense was outlined as Mr. Billman's trial on federal fraud charges opened in Baltimore. The trial -- which is going forward more than four years after Mr. Billman was indicted -- had to wait for the defendant, who was extradited from France in December after several years as a fugitive.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,Sun Staff Writer | February 7, 1994
This is a day federal prosecutors say Tom J. Billman crossed an ocean to avoid.The former executive will step into a federal courtroom in Baltimore this morning for the start of his trial on charges of looting his Bethesda savings and loan of $28 million.For the government, the case has required patience. Mr. Billman disappeared in 1988 as he was being investigated and was still missing a year later when a federal grand jury indicted him on multiple counts of fraud. He pursued an extraordinary life until his arrest in France nearly a year ago.No longer is he George M. Lady, the worldly businessman investigators say he claimed to be in 1989 while cruising the Mediterranean on his two yachts and throwing lavish parties for newfound friends.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | April 22, 1992
Two former Community Savings and Loan officials were acquitted yesterday of charges they defrauded depositors of millions of dollars to prop up a mortgage company and line their own pockets.After a four-month trial in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, Chief Judge Walter E. Black Jr. returned the innocent verdicts for Clayton C. McCuistion, 49, the thrift's former president, and Barbara A. McKinney, 41, a former Community director and one-time vice president and legal counsel of its defunct holding company.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Tanya Jones and Marcia Myers and Tanya Jones,Sun Staff Writers | October 28, 1994
Police in Austria say they have unearthed about $4 million more hidden by Maryland savings and loan swindler Tom J. Billman, who went to prison in June claiming to be broke and asking taxpayers to pay his legal fees.The multimillion-dollar hoard, dispersed among several bank accounts, came to light recently during an investigation by police in Vienna. Austrian police were drawn into the case last spring after a courier for Billman was arrested while attempting to make a $5 million transaction that the former executive had ordered from his jail cell.
NEWS
By Gary Cohn and Marcia Myers and Gary Cohn and Marcia Myers,Staff Writers | December 16, 1993
A federal magistrate yesterday shot down a proposal to release longtime fugitive Tom J. Billman from jail while he awaits trial on looting his Bethesda savings and loan of $28 million.U.S. Magistrate Judge Daniel E. Klein Jr. turned down the request after Assistant U.S. Attorney Barbara S. Sale called Mr. Billman "the top dog" in the failure of his thrift and cautioned that he "posed a classic risk of flight.""If ever there was a flight risk, this case is it," Ms. Sale said. "This is not a man for the court to take a chance on."
NEWS
By Gary Cohn and Marcia Myers and Gary Cohn and Marcia Myers,Staff Writers | December 15, 1993
Tom J. Billman, accused of looting his Maryland savings and loan of $28 million, was escorted here from a Paris jail yesterday, ending a lengthy international manhunt and extradition battle.Mr. Billman disappeared in December 1988 and lived grandly overseas for a time before being captured at his Paris apartment in March while posing as a champagne entrepreneur named John Rink.At 5:08 p.m. yesterday, Mr. Billman, in a dark suit, white shirt and handcuffs, set foot on Maryland soil for the first time in five years.
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