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By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,Evening Sun Staff | August 15, 1991
The Arita family, who lives in Saki City, Osaka, says many Japanese have little sensitivity when it comes to racial issues.So the Aritas formed a group to combat racism. Yesterday, the family visited Baltimore at the invitation of black-owned companies promoting business ties between black American and Japanese firms.The family operates the Association to Stop Racism Against Blacks in Japan. Founded in 1988, the organization has fought to remove from Japanese society products demeaning to blacks -- such as black dolls with exaggerated facial features and Little Black Sambo toys.
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NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff writer | June 30, 1991
A panel created to fight discrimination continues to battle for its own survival, but has found a temporary home with a private agency.Meanwhile, the County Commissioners remain undecided on whether they should formally support such a panel.Richard D. Bucher, chairman of Carroll County's Community Relations Commission, said he and the other six volunteer members believe the commissioners' seeming lack of support for their group sends a message that discrimination isn't a problem.Bucher said in addition to philosophical support, his panel needs a consistent address to which people can send or phone in complaints, and minimal money for postage, phone calls and fliers.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | September 12, 1998
Skirting questions about the scandal enveloping President Clinton, her former classmate, Harvard University law professor Lani Guinier said yesterday the country should focus more on the public actions of elected officials instead of scrutinizing their private lives.She added that she is "skeptical about the life of the independent counsel" position now occupied by Kenneth W. Starr.The statements came in an interview after Guinier spoke at a downtown Baltimore breakfast attended by nearly 800 and sponsored by the Community Relations Commission, a city agency that deals with civil rights and discrimination complaints.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Evening Sun Staff | December 18, 1990
Baltimore County's revamped Human Relations Commission is planning two public hearings to help it determine if discrimination against lesbians and homosexuals should be banned under county law.The County Council refused to outlaw discrimination based on sexual orientation in enacting legislation that created a new and stronger Human Relations Commission in September 1989 to replace an inactive commission. The council left the issue for the revised commission.The old 11-member county Community Relations Commission had not met in two years, had no paid staff or subpoena powers and was virtually defunct when former County Executive Dennis Rasmussen named a new, larger body with subpoena powers in November 1989.
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2001
A proposed 26 percent budget cut to Baltimore's anti-discrimination agency, the Community Relations Commission, has triggered concerns among some city officials and minority groups, particularly the city's gay and lesbian community. The commission, once hailed as a model for city government efforts to combat discrimination, is down to 17 staffers from a 1970s high of 60. Commission officials, braced for steep budget cuts, were surprised when Mayor Martin O'Malley two weeks ago proposed cutting a quarter of their funding -- from $949,485 -- which includes $50,000 in federal funds -- to $704,618 in his preliminary budget plan.
NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,Evening Sun Staff | May 16, 1991
Baltimore has a serious race relations problem -- including widespread racial and ethnic discrimination, according to the overwhelming majority of people who responded to a questionnaire at the city's racial summit in November.The results of the poll were to be released today at the annual breakfast meeting of the Baltimore Community Relations Commission.Ninety-three percent of the respondents indicated that the city either has a "very serious" or "somewhat serious" race relations problem.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Evening Sun Staff | June 14, 1991
Yoko Akashi says a small group of people in her native Japan are beginning to make some progress in getting Japanese publishers to stop distributing materials with negative images of blacks.Akashi, a junior at Indiana University in Pennsylvania, also said yesterday that the 80-member Association to Stop Racism Against Blacks also has had some small success in pressuring Japanese firms to stop using racial stereotypes in their advertising."Little by little, we're making a difference," Akashi, 21, said during a visit to the Baltimore Community Relations Commission.
NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Joe Nawrozki and Patrick Gilbert and Joe Nawrozki,Evening Sun Staff | September 18, 1991
The Maryland Court of Special Appeals has ordered the city to rehire a man who failed a fire department physical examination shortly after he entered the fire academy in May 1985.As a result of the decision, Charles E. Johnson, now 36, is eligible to re-enter the fire academy with back wages. "I had wanted to be a firefighter since I was a kid," Johnson said today. "When they fired me, I was heartbroken."That hurt was translated into determination, he said, when he chose to battle to "get back what was rightfully mine."
NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,Evening Sun Staff | November 29, 1990
About 1,300 people have already registered for tomorrow's Baltimore Summit on Race Relations, and more are expected to sign up at the door.The summit is scheduled in two sessions, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., and from 4 to 9 p.m., at the Baltimore Convention Center. It will feature workshops on a variety of topics on race relations: youth, cultural diversity, criminal justice, education, business, religion, media, government, African-American and Jewish relations, and African-American and Korean relations.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | December 11, 1996
A shake-up of the city police command staff -- intended to reinvigorate the department and address concerns that blacks were being treated unfairly -- has instead heightened racial tensions.Police Commissioner Thomas C. Frazier is winning praise for some moves, but he is being criticized for making the highest-ranking black commander share his job with another colonel and dividing those they supervise along racial lines.In a city where race is often a significant issue, even routine reshuffling in the police hierarchy is scrutinized.
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