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By Los Angeles Times | July 26, 1992
Q: I still do not understand the difference between community property and joint tenancy. My wife, age 55, and I, age 70, hold our home as joint tenants, but our friends insist that we change it to community property. Should we?A: There are considerable advantages to holding your home and other assets as community property rather than as joint tenants. Although holding as joint tenants may avoid probate upon the death of one spouse, any savings in time and costs may be more than offset by the loss of the principal advantage of community property, which is a step-up in value for 100 percent of all marital assets to the decedent's date of death.
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BUSINESS
By Liz Pulliam Weston and Liz Pulliam Weston,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 3, 2002
My son died 18 months ago. He left behind his fiancee and twin girls. My husband and I are separated and each received $25,000 from our son's life insurance policy. We are both very close to his fiancee, who has asked whether she could have $10,000 from the life insurance proceeds. She would use it to have new siding put on the house, which desperately needs it. I have no problem with helping her, but I wonder what tax implications I will have. Earlier this year I gave her $5,000 toward the purchase of a new car. Don't let tax worries prevent you from helping your grandchildren and their mother.
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BUSINESS
By Liz Pulliam Weston and Liz Pulliam Weston,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 3, 2002
My son died 18 months ago. He left behind his fiancee and twin girls. My husband and I are separated and each received $25,000 from our son's life insurance policy. We are both very close to his fiancee, who has asked whether she could have $10,000 from the life insurance proceeds. She would use it to have new siding put on the house, which desperately needs it. I have no problem with helping her, but I wonder what tax implications I will have. Earlier this year I gave her $5,000 toward the purchase of a new car. Don't let tax worries prevent you from helping your grandchildren and their mother.
NEWS
October 15, 2000
Section 8 housing has undermined quality of life For almost 18 years I have lived in a pleasant, racially mixed townhouse condominium community consisting of decent working-class people. Then some investors, none of whom who live in the community, took it upon themselves to organize, without any input from the community, and lease their properties in the Section 8 program. The end result has been devastating. The vast majority of the participants in the program have demonstrated complete disregard for the rights and property of others.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Staff Writer | October 2, 1994
Since 1971, John Baumgarten has spent $30,000 to erect a shed, install a water line, build brick steps and put in electricity and a patio on the sloping waterfront tract behind his Cape St. Claire home.Friday, an Anne Arundel Circuit Court judge ruled that the property belongs to the community, not to Mr. Baumgarten."I think it's wrong, and I disagree. But it's something I'll just have to live with," said Mr. Baumgarten, a construction contractor.Mr. Baumgarten was one of a group of St. Claire homeowners who sued the Cape St. Claire Community Association in 1992, asking a judge to declare them owners of the waterfront tracts behind the homes they bought in the 1970s and 1980s.
NEWS
By Robert Lee and Robert Lee,Staff writer | November 1, 1990
Severna Forest is petitioning to become the county's first community to impose a gypsy moth-control tax.If Severna Forest Community Association vice president Albert Johnston can get the OK from more than half of the 170 homeowners in his development, and if the petition clears the public hearing process, those residents will see a $15 increase tacked on to their property tax bills next July."
NEWS
By Shirley Leung and Shirley Leung,Sun Staff Writer | July 9, 1995
In the age of tax cuts, tax revolts and tax caps, some Marylanders actually want to pay more.When the bills go out this month, nearly 18,000 Anne Arundel County households -- 11 percent of the total -- will pay an additional $2 million in real estate taxes to maintain their neighborhoods' roads, recreation centers and piers.That's an average of $111 more for each of those families -- money residents voluntarily hand over.These residents live in the 42 active "special community benefit districts" established in the county over the last 66 years.
NEWS
October 15, 2000
Section 8 housing has undermined quality of life For almost 18 years I have lived in a pleasant, racially mixed townhouse condominium community consisting of decent working-class people. Then some investors, none of whom who live in the community, took it upon themselves to organize, without any input from the community, and lease their properties in the Section 8 program. The end result has been devastating. The vast majority of the participants in the program have demonstrated complete disregard for the rights and property of others.
NEWS
By Arlene Baker | May 27, 2007
TUESDAY Mental Health Agency -- The Anne Arundel County Mental Health Agency Board of Directors will meet at 4 p.m. at 2664 Riva Road, Heritage Office Complex, Annapolis, to review and implement a policy for individuals accessing public mental health services. 410-222-7858. Odenton Oversight Committee -- The Odenton Town Center Plan Oversight Committee will meet at 6:30 p.m. at the Western District Police Station, 8273 Telegraph Road. The committee is an advocate for Odenton community property owners, developers and businesses in the growth management area.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | August 19, 1999
TOLCHESTER -- When she was growing up, Trisha Sawicki played in the Chesapeake Bay just a short stroll from the summer cottage that her grandfather built in this once-popular bayfront resort."
NEWS
By Shirley Leung and Shirley Leung,Sun Staff Writer | July 9, 1995
In the age of tax cuts, tax revolts and tax caps, some Marylanders actually want to pay more.When the bills go out this month, nearly 18,000 Anne Arundel County households -- 11 percent of the total -- will pay an additional $2 million in real estate taxes to maintain their neighborhoods' roads, recreation centers and piers.That's an average of $111 more for each of those families -- money residents voluntarily hand over.These residents live in the 42 active "special community benefit districts" established in the county over the last 66 years.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Staff Writer | October 2, 1994
Since 1971, John Baumgarten has spent $30,000 to erect a shed, install a water line, build brick steps and put in electricity and a patio on the sloping waterfront tract behind his Cape St. Claire home.Friday, an Anne Arundel Circuit Court judge ruled that the property belongs to the community, not to Mr. Baumgarten."I think it's wrong, and I disagree. But it's something I'll just have to live with," said Mr. Baumgarten, a construction contractor.Mr. Baumgarten was one of a group of St. Claire homeowners who sued the Cape St. Claire Community Association in 1992, asking a judge to declare them owners of the waterfront tracts behind the homes they bought in the 1970s and 1980s.
BUSINESS
By Los Angeles Times | July 26, 1992
Q: I still do not understand the difference between community property and joint tenancy. My wife, age 55, and I, age 70, hold our home as joint tenants, but our friends insist that we change it to community property. Should we?A: There are considerable advantages to holding your home and other assets as community property rather than as joint tenants. Although holding as joint tenants may avoid probate upon the death of one spouse, any savings in time and costs may be more than offset by the loss of the principal advantage of community property, which is a step-up in value for 100 percent of all marital assets to the decedent's date of death.
NEWS
By Robert Lee and Robert Lee,Staff writer | November 1, 1990
Severna Forest is petitioning to become the county's first community to impose a gypsy moth-control tax.If Severna Forest Community Association vice president Albert Johnston can get the OK from more than half of the 170 homeowners in his development, and if the petition clears the public hearing process, those residents will see a $15 increase tacked on to their property tax bills next July."
NEWS
By TaNoah V. Sterling and TaNoah V. Sterling,Sun Staff Writer | December 7, 1994
An $18 increase in the tax Manhattan Beach residents pay to help maintain community property has come under scrutiny by county officials and some community residents who wonder whether the money can be used to create a $10,000 legal fund.Residents at a community meeting in October voted unanimously to use the one-year increase to set up the fund, but the section of the county code that created Manhattan Beach's special benefit tax district does not specifically list litigation as one of the purposes for which the money can be used.
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