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By Sloane Brown | April 4, 1999
Guests at the Maryland Institute, College of Art's Artafare didn't have to go far to have dinner in the French countryside, or in a New York cabaret, or in the midst of the Milky Way. Those exotic locales, and seven more, could all be found in the institute's main building.Mingling in the main court before dinner was an eclectic collection of 470 guests, including Fredye and Adam Gross, event co-chairs; Fred Lazarus, Maryland Institute president; Ann South, the institute's event planner; Doreen Bolger, director of the Baltimore Museum of Art; and Kay MacIntosh, editor of Style magazine.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
The Baltimore Community Foundation awarded nearly $123,000 for 33 community projects that will pay for litter clean up, increase the number of vegetable gardens and bring kids and police officers together for flag football games. The foundation, which announced the grants Friday, will distribute the money throughout the city and Baltimore County as a way to spur neighborhood activism. The grants range from $1,500 to $5,000. "Social engagement is key to neighborhood development, and we are seeing some real changes happening from the bottom up," Tom Wilcox, foundation president, said in a statement.
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NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Writer | June 21, 1994
A National African-American Development Fund is likely to be one result of the black leadership summit held in Baltimore, the NAACP's chief executive said yesterday.The Rev. Benjamin F. Chavis Jr. told editorial writers at The Sun that the summit's economic development committee was "putting the nuts and bolts together" for a fund to provide venture capital to black entrepreneurs and money for community projects."What if thousands of black churches started depositing money in a [fund] every Monday morning?"
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2013
Antonio Iglesia has a well-toned, muscular build, one similar to those of men who spend Sunday afternoons crossing lines of scrimmage and chasing quarterbacks. But the Anne Arundel Community College student says he has been in two relationships involving women who abused him physically. "They became aggressive, and because I'm a man, both times they felt that I could take it," said the 35-year-old student, who spoke candidly about being abused while decorating a T-shirt at the college during preparations this past week for a local event related to the national Clothesline Project.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Staff writer | September 4, 1991
The Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development has rejected this town's application for a $274,500 Small Cities Community Block Development grant for four community projects."
NEWS
November 3, 1992
An auction conducted Oct. 23 by Carroll Community Church earned $5,500 for the church's community projects, said Tricia Duke, wife of Pastor Joe Duke."
EXPLORE
Record staff report | April 11, 2012
Soroptimist International of Havre de Grace recently met with the Community Projects of Havre de Grace Committee to complete the final payment of their 10-year pledge to the James Harris Stadium project. In 2002, a discussion between Jean Royster, then president of Soroptimists, and Steve William, principal of Havre de Grace High School, resulted in the Soroptimist Club pledging $10,000 toward construction of the stadium. The James Harris Stadium has been an ongoing community project embraced by local people, organizations and businesses to construct an outstanding facility in memory of James Harris, former athletic director at Havre de Grace High.
NEWS
December 13, 1996
HOUSE TOURS are a unique American tradition. Nowhere else in the world will ordinary people open their homes to strangers who buy a ticket. Yes, some of the castles and manor houses of England and France can be toured for a fee. But they are not regular people's homes.This is the season of house tours and a nice one is coming up. Six Uniontown homes and several other buildings can be toured from noon to 5 p.m. Sunday. The admission is $10 and all proceeds go to community projects."We hope to raise several thousand dollars," tour organizer Barbara Childs says.
EXPLORE
December 1, 2012
Catonsville Rails To Trails (CRTT) would like to welcome and thank the C'ville Bike Shop and The Hub, two of the newest additions to Catonsville's retail section. These bike shops have already made a significant impact on our community. In October, they hosted a successful first Catonsville Oystoberfest, then donated $350 of their proceeds to CRTT and $350 to the Mid-Atlantic Mountain Bike Enthusiasts. They also run a non-profit program, Changing Gears, turning donated bikes into reliable transportation for those who depend on non-motorized vehicles to get to work.
NEWS
October 26, 1994
Stewart A. Kingsbury, 71, a linguist who documented the roots of Upper Peninsula dialect in New England, Canada, Finland and Italy, died Sunday in Marquette, Mich., after a lengthy illness. He was co-editor of the Dictionary of American Proverbs, published in 1992.Robert Lansing, 66, who starred on Broadway and in the TV series "12 O'Clock High," died Sunday of cancer in New York. On television, he played Brig. Gen. Frank Savage in "12 O'Clock High" and appeared in episodes of other series.
FEATURES
By Zach Sparks, For The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2013
When passersby drive through West Baltimore's Sandtown-Winchester community, they won't see flags symbolizing unity or notice traces of an affluent town. What they will see is a neighborhood once riddled with drug trade and prostitution, now being transformed with the help of activists like Pastor C.W. Harris. A native of Sandtown-Winchester, Harris is one of 15 BMe Leadership Award recipients being recognized as black men doing their part to better Baltimore. Funded by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation and the Open Society Foundations, BMe (Black Male Engagement)
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2013
Change has swept through the University of Baltimore — and the surrounding neighborhood — over the past decade. Striking new academic buildings, an apartment building and the university's first dormitory have appeared among the brownstones of the Midtown neighborhood. New shops and restaurants brighten once-dingy blocks. Streets that were deserted after dark now buzz with students. "It seems more like a university environment now," said Earl Spain, 59, who completed his bachelor's degree at UB in 2002 and is working on a master's in criminal justice.
EXPLORE
December 1, 2012
Catonsville Rails To Trails (CRTT) would like to welcome and thank the C'ville Bike Shop and The Hub, two of the newest additions to Catonsville's retail section. These bike shops have already made a significant impact on our community. In October, they hosted a successful first Catonsville Oystoberfest, then donated $350 of their proceeds to CRTT and $350 to the Mid-Atlantic Mountain Bike Enthusiasts. They also run a non-profit program, Changing Gears, turning donated bikes into reliable transportation for those who depend on non-motorized vehicles to get to work.
EXPLORE
By Bob Allen | August 14, 2012
With its rolling lawns and stately trees, the grounds of Babcock Presbyterian Church, just off busy Loch Raven Boulevard, is like an urban oasis. On a sweltering early August morning, a cool breeze sweeps across a grassy knoll behind the church building. The open space along Loch Ness Road is contoured with a dozen small, rectangular garden plots where squash, cucumbers, tomatoes and cantaloupes ripen on the vine and an occasional rabbit darts across the lawn and into the trees. The little plots, most about the size of a large dining room table, are part of the community garden project that Babcock Church started last year.
BUSINESS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2012
Military past and present came together Friday morning on a patch of farmland that played a key role in the defense of Baltimore during the War of 1812. Armed with the weapons of landscaping, 55 sailors and Marines in town for the Star-Spangled Sailabration reclaimed the ground around Todd's Inheritance Historic Site from years of neglect. "Does everyone know their assignment?" asked Larry Leone, an officer on the historic site's board. "Destroy bushes," barked Marines. In just three hours, massive boxwoods gave ground, hostile wasps beat a retreat and tree-strangling vines and poison ivy were neutralized.
EXPLORE
Record staff report | April 11, 2012
Soroptimist International of Havre de Grace recently met with the Community Projects of Havre de Grace Committee to complete the final payment of their 10-year pledge to the James Harris Stadium project. In 2002, a discussion between Jean Royster, then president of Soroptimists, and Steve William, principal of Havre de Grace High School, resulted in the Soroptimist Club pledging $10,000 toward construction of the stadium. The James Harris Stadium has been an ongoing community project embraced by local people, organizations and businesses to construct an outstanding facility in memory of James Harris, former athletic director at Havre de Grace High.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | September 2, 1999
The United Way of Central Maryland announced a goal of $41 million for its 1999 campaign yesterday, a 4.2 percent increase over the amount raised last year.President Larry E. Walton kicked off the campaign yesterday as United Way's annual "Day of Caring" drew 1,400 volunteers to 64 sites around the region for community projects such as planting trees, ice cream socials for children and events for seniors.About $6.2 million of the goal has been raised through "early bird" campaigns, run during the summer by a number of companies before the official campaign kickoff.
NEWS
By Vicki Wellford and Vicki Wellford,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 5, 1997
THE GAMBRILLS Odenton Recreation Council will sponsor a summer soccer camp from 9 a.m. to noon Aug. 11 through 15 for boys and girls ages 5 through 17.Instructors from the USA School of Soccer Excellence will teach passing, receiving, heading, shooting and dribbling to help young players develop their skills. The players will put their lessons into practice during scrimmages at the end of each day.Each child will receive a camp soccer shirt, a certificate of achievement award and a ticket to a Baltimore Bays soccer game.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2011
Tony Guthrie never met the man he calls "the best mayor we ever had," William Donald Schaefer, who died in April. "He loved this city," said Guthrie, 51, who owns a barbershop in Baltimore's Pimlico neighborhood. "I would have loved to shake his hand. " But if Guthrie never got that close to Schaefer during his lifetime, he brushed up against his legacy on Tuesday, which would have been the 90th birthday of the former mayor, governor and comptroller. Guthrie was among those who celebrated the milestone in a way that surely would have made the cantankerous Schaefer smile — by expending some elbow grease to tidy up the town.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2010
The Canton neighborhood has discovered how good it is to give back. In the past four years, as an old convent found new life as a home to dozens of bone-marrow transplant patients and their families, Southeast Baltimore residents and business people have brought meals and love to families caught up in complicated medical treatments that stretch over many months. The Believe in Tomorrow House at St. Casimir — just off Canton's O'Donnell Square — has become the focus of neighborhood goodwill.
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