Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCommunity Policing
IN THE NEWS

Community Policing

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 12, 2013
Baltimore City Police Commissioner Anthony Batts has myriad issues to tackle as we delve deeper into 2013. Some priorities are the open air drug markets on our streets, the vacant housing issue (which has devoured many a city rowhouse), gangs, homelessness, and finding ways to make our neighborhoods and communities safer places in which to live. The major impediment or obstacle the commissioner is facing is the inherent mistrust of many of his constituents. For some city residents, this mindset has crossed generations.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | August 21, 2014
What next? That's what should concern us now. When the nightly dance of angry protesters, opportunistic criminals and inept police clashing over the shooting of unarmed black teenager Michael Brown finally ends, what steps should civic-minded people take to address the ongoing abuse of African Americans by the criminal injustice system? Not just in Ferguson, Mo., but in America? There will be no shortage of good ideas: dashboard cameras, community policing, the hiring of more black cops, the removal of military hardware from police arsenals, sensitivity training.
Advertisement
NEWS
July 2, 1991
The name "community" policing may be somewhat misleading, but the basic idea is sound. A better description might be "problem-oriented policing." And, as Mayor Schmoke remarked last week in announcing that he would like to see more of it Baltimore, it represents a promising trend in law enforcement.Police officers have long known that their jobs currently consist mostly of responding to one emergency call after another, often in the same neighborhood and involving the same people. In most cities, the majority of 911 calls come from a relatively small number of areas and involve only about 20 percent of the population.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2013
Climb the steps and walk past the concrete columns that grace many Baltimore police stations and you'll encounter shuttered glass doors, blocked off by plywood, brown paper or the backs of file cabinets. Somewhere along the way, the public entrances to four of the city's nine district stations became casualties as police outgrew their space, with citizens instead directed to rear doors where officers and handcuffed suspects come and go. That will change in the Northwestern District on Reisterstown Road this week.
NEWS
By Kathy Curtis and Kathy Curtis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 30, 1998
AN AFTER-SCHOOL recreational program for middle school youngsters and a cleaner village center are among the first results of the Community Policing Program begun in Harper's Choice village this summer.The program was introduced at a two-day forum in June, led by Howard County police and members of the national Community Policing Consortium.Anti-crime tactics developed by residents of Harper's Choice will be used as models for other communities.During the summer, volunteers formed a task force facilitated by Helen Sutusky, a former village board member, and the Rev. Randy Reinhardt, senior pastor of Covenant Community Church, which holds Sunday services at Kahler Hall.
NEWS
February 29, 1992
In the 1960s, when Donald Pomerleau set out to reform the Baltimore City Police Department, he had to overhaul an agency that was outmoded, ineffective and corrupt. Being an ex-marine, the late Mr. Pomerleau modeled his department after a military organization. Today, seven ranks separate a beat officer from the commissioner.A Silver Spring consulting firm says "serious consideration should be given to softening the centralized militaristic form of management." Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke and Commissioner Edward V. Woods seem to agree.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 13, 1994
WASHINGTON -- In 1992, when Bill Clinton ran for president, Haiti, health care and Hillary Rodham Clinton were not big campaign themes. But "community policing" was. In speech after speech on the campaign trail, Mr. Clinton quoted statistics showing that the number of police officers on the beat had not kept pace with increases in population, criminals or crimes.Candidate Clinton pledged to foster cooperation between police departments and the public in the approach known as community policing.
NEWS
By Henry H. Brownstein | April 21, 1999
ALMOST everyone knows by now of the shooting death of Amadou Diallo, an unarmed West African immigrant, in a hail of 41 bullets fired by New York City police on Feb. 4. The incident has polarized New York, prompting hundreds of people of all ages, races and creeds to be arrested during 15 days of protests over the police slaying. The immediate focus of the demonstrations was the killing. But the broader focus is New York's so-called "zero tolerance" policy toward minor offenses supported by New York Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani.
NEWS
March 12, 2013
Baltimore City Police Commissioner Anthony Batts has myriad issues to tackle as we delve deeper into 2013. Some priorities are the open air drug markets on our streets, the vacant housing issue (which has devoured many a city rowhouse), gangs, homelessness, and finding ways to make our neighborhoods and communities safer places in which to live. The major impediment or obstacle the commissioner is facing is the inherent mistrust of many of his constituents. For some city residents, this mindset has crossed generations.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2012
Annapolis police are looking for Clarence Eugene Johnson III, after obtaining a warrant charging him with first-degree murder of a Brooklyn man and the shooting of a woman Wednesday night in Robinwood public housing community in the city. Joseph Louis Johnson III, 33, was killed and Jana Jackson, 31, was critically wounded in the shootings that occurred in the 1400 block of Tyler Ave. Jackson was taken to the Maryland Shock Trauma Center, which she is critical condition, police said.
NEWS
By PETER HERMANN and PETER HERMANN,peter.hermann@baltsun.com | September 5, 2008
Bea Haskins was in the upstairs study of her home on South Woodington Road when she heard the gunshots. She ran to a window in time to see a man jump into a pickup truck. "He shouted something to the effect of, 'We have to get out of here,'" she said yesterday. The body fell near her door. Haskins' house is well-kept, with a grass plot surrounded by a tall wooden fence across the street from Mount St. Joseph's High School. She has a comfortably shaded porch painted the color of sandstone to match the color she made every other brick in her facade.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,Sun reporter | June 29, 2008
Living in Northern Virginia, lobbyist Greg Whisenant couldn't believe how difficult it was to get information about local crime. So last year he did something about it, launching CrimeReports.com, a Web site that works with local governments to post free crime maps online. "I think there is an expectation on the part of the public to see this data," said Whisenant, a lobbyist turned Internet entrepreneur. About the same time in California, Gino Sesto and a friend were swapping stories about experiences with police officers who gave them traffic tickets.
NEWS
By Tim Jones and Tim Jones,Chicago Tribune | May 6, 2007
WORTHINGTON, Ohio -- They don't make things like they used to in Ohio, a state that has become a living museum of dead American factories. Drive around Ohio and you can see the effects of assembly-line wreckage in cities that used to boast of tires (Akron), glass (Toledo), cash registers (Dayton), steel (Cleveland and Youngstown). Even production of the toy icon Etch-A-Sketch, formerly in the small town of Bryan, has been shipped to the cheap-labor haven of China. Now communities all over the state play host to the relentless economic assault on General Motors, Ford, Daimler Chrysler and their parts suppliers.
NEWS
By Will Beall | May 2, 2007
I was in my dorm room at San Diego State University, listening to the Led Zeppelin cover of "When the Levee Breaks," when I first saw George Holliday's amateur video of the Rodney King incident on CNN. It looked like those grainy films of Selma, Ala., in 1965, and the brutality turned my stomach. They didn't really talk about Rodney King when I went through the Los Angeles Police Academy a few years later.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,sun reporter | March 20, 2007
Community leaders from several Baltimore neighborhoods told Mayor Sheila Dixon last night that an increase in police foot patrols and more activities for young people would help deter crime. The suggestions came during the first of four "emergency" meetings at City Hall called by Dixon this week to address Baltimore's crime woes - part of a broader effort to move the Police Department toward community policing. Defining the city's policing strategy, Dixon administration officials said, requires that the administration hear from community leaders about solutions to crime.
NEWS
By NINA SEARS and NINA SEARS,Sun Reporter | February 22, 2007
Three teenagers walking through an Annapolis public housing community were shot Tuesday night by someone in a passing van, city police said yesterday. The teens, ages 13, 15 and 18, were each hit once below the waist about 9:20 p.m. and didn't suffer life-threatening injuries, said Officer Kevin Freeman, a police spokesman. The 13-year-old boy, of the 400 block of Captain's Circle, was shot in the buttock; the 15-year-old, of the 2000 block of Forest Drive, was struck in the left calf; and Rondell Alexander Franklin Jr. of Glen Burnie was shot in the left ankle.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.