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November 10, 2012
The GFWC Woman's Club of Westminster Inc., has begun sales of its 2012 ornament - this year depicting Baker Memorial Chapel at McDaniel College in Westminster. The ornament depicting Baker Memorial Chapel is the ninth in a series presenting historic buildings in the community of Westminster. Baker Memorial Chapel was dedicated April 20, 1958. The ornaments are $21 each. The ornament sale is a major fund raiser for the Woman's Club of Westminster, which for the last 101 years has provided volunteer service and support to our community.
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NEWS
By Jon Meoli, jmeoli@tribune.com | February 21, 2014
Towson precinct's police commander during a community meeting Thursday urged residents to be vigilant in their communities, because the area is experiencing an increase in daytime residential burglaries. "Take it back to your communities, and make sure you watch your neighbor's homes if you are home all day, because that's what's increasing now," Capt. Richard Howard told a collection of community leaders at Thursday's monthly Greater Towson Council of Community Associations meeting at the Pickersgill Retirement Community.
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NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | September 3, 1998
Johns Hopkins University freshman Amanda Owens got an eye-opening education yesterday -- in the streets of North Baltimore.She was one of several college kids armed with brooms and trash bags, cleaning their way through various communities and playgrounds littered with weeds, broken glass and other signs of urban decay. It was the school's way of welcoming incoming freshmen to their new neighborhood.The cleanup extended into area streets, waterways and schools and involved about 900 first-year students, university officials said.
NEWS
By Tim Schwartz, The Baltimore Sun | November 3, 2013
Nine St. John's Episcopal Youth Group teenagers spent several hours hearing testimonies and serving lunch to poor and homeless people at the Helping Up Mission in Baltimore on the last Sunday in October. It's one of many good deeds done recently by the high school-age kids, which is why the group is among 16 organizations being recognized this season for their volunteer service by the Ravens and the Governor's Office on Service and Volunteerism. Recipients of the 14th annual Honor Rows Program, the 46 youth group members and leaders will be honored at the Ravens home game against the Cincinnati Bengals on Sunday.
NEWS
By Linda Linley and Linda Linley,SUN STAFF | April 24, 2002
Petite Laura Douglas was lugging filled trash bags almost as big as she is out of a basement storage room and onto the sidewalk along Calvert Street at North Avenue in Baltimore. "I'm strong," said Douglas, 15, a sophomore at McDonogh School in Owings Mills. "I can handle it." Two blocks away, at St. Paul and 21st streets, teacher Laddie Levy was supervising more than three dozen teen-agers filling a big metal trash bin with trash from an old aquarium supply store. "They're good workers," said Levy, an English teacher at McDonogh for 32 years.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | December 28, 1999
City Council President Sheila Dixon has appointed three top aides who will be responsible for the office's legislative agenda, fiscal affairs and community outreach.Dixon named Beatrice L. Tripps as director of fiscal affairs, Peter Dolkart director of legislative affairs, and Debbie Sines Crockett director of community outreach.Tripps, a former contract and program operations specialist in the city Office of Employment Development, will be responsible for budget issues before the Board of Estimates, of which Dixon is chairwoman.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett | November 28, 1993
Colene Daniel's education began with hope, determinationWhile other corporate executives talk a good game about coming up the hard way, few could match the odds Colene Daniel faced.A vice president at Johns Hopkins Hospital currently oversees a $32 million budget and 700 employees. But 30 years ago, she was an 8-year-old sent to live at the Colored Orphanage of Cincinnati. Ms. Daniel spent four years at the orphanage, then three years in various foster homes before running away and striking out on her own.At 15, she was living in a basement apartment and working odd jobs to support herself.
NEWS
By Alia Malik and Alia Malik,Sun reporter | August 10, 2007
Operation Safe Streets, a program run by the city Health Department to prevent violence through community outreach, will expand to an area in the western part of the city, Mayor Sheila Dixon and Health Commissioner Dr. Joshua M. Sharfstein announced yesterday. Since June, the program has been implemented in parts of the McElderry Park and Madison East neighborhoods. The specific location of the new area has not been determined, but it will be in West or Southwest Baltimore and will be determined by homicide and shooting statistics, Dixon said.
NEWS
February 25, 1994
When Howard County's 1993 crime statistics were recently released and a 3.4 percent drop in overall crime was reported, police officials credited the community outreach methods that have been part of department policy since James Robey became chief three years ago.Howard, indeed, seems a jurisdiction especially well-suited to community policing. The county's size and population are relatively manageable, and the problems associated with urban pockets elsewhere in the Baltimore metropolitan area have yet to affect suburban Howard significantly.
NEWS
June 2, 1993
The final four performances in the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's pop concerts this week are great examples of a two-fer. Maestro David Zinman has divided the program between excerpts from Gershwin's "Porgy and Bess" and Oscar Hammerstein's "Carmen Jones," a homespun adaptation of Bizet's famous opera. Moreover, the performances are integral parts of two significant efforts launched by the BSO to attract new listeners: a pops series aimed at younger music lovers and a community outreach series designed to entice more African-Americans to the Meyerhoff.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2013
On her first official day of work, Julia Marciari-Alexander heads down to the basement of the Walters Art Museum to say hello to a room full of squirmy 8-, 9- and 10-year-olds attending summer camp. A girl with curly, brown hair looks up from the strand of wire she's twisting with a pair of pliers to form the framework of a small animal. "What does a museum director do?," she asks Marciari-Alexander. All of Baltimore's arts community is waiting to find out how the Walters' new leader will answer that question.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin, For The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2013
In the months since the weather warmed up, a Kona Ice truck has been traveling to events in Baltimore County — car shows and ball games and the farmers' market in Towson, to name a few. The brightly colored truck, owned by Joni and Claude Elmore, sells cones filled with shaved ice. Customers can add their own flavored syrups from a row of 10 choices affixed to the side of the vehicle, or request a flavor from the 20 inside the truck. Meanwhile, calypso music plays. Kona Ice, founded in 2007, now has more than 300 franchised trucks operating in 41 states and each one has a mandate to give to the communities it serves.
EXPLORE
November 10, 2012
The GFWC Woman's Club of Westminster Inc., has begun sales of its 2012 ornament - this year depicting Baker Memorial Chapel at McDaniel College in Westminster. The ornament depicting Baker Memorial Chapel is the ninth in a series presenting historic buildings in the community of Westminster. Baker Memorial Chapel was dedicated April 20, 1958. The ornaments are $21 each. The ornament sale is a major fund raiser for the Woman's Club of Westminster, which for the last 101 years has provided volunteer service and support to our community.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 20, 2009
Lt. Robert McCullough, a 43-year-old community-outreach team commander who has been with the Baltimore County police force since he joined as a cadet at age 18, is to be the department's new chief spokesman. McCullough, currently assigned to the Randallstown substation, will move soon to the department's headquarters in Towson to replace Bill Toohey, a civilian who has held the job of spokesman since 1996. Toohey was told earlier this week that he was being dismissed to make way for a uniformed officer.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,SUN REPORTER | August 7, 2008
Not far from where a huge development of big-box retail stores and gleaming apartment, condo and office towers have emerged on the edge of Annapolis sits a modest church on a hill. The Mount Olive African Methodist Episcopal Church, founded in 1870 in Parole, has for decades provided support services to the community out of its basement. Since 2000, the Rev. Johnny R. Calhoun has lobbied state, county and city leaders for help in funding an addition to the 750-member church, hoping to expand the community outreach that includes after-school care and programs for the elderly.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,Sun reporter | October 21, 2007
PHILADELPHIA -- A thickset man called "Earthquake" slips yellow cards into the open windows of passing motorists at 60th Street and Woodland Avenue. A tall man with movie-star good looks wedges a poster into the windshield of a city bus stopped at a traffic light. A man with a radio host voice calls for support over a portable microphone. The three are among a small army of men trying to energize this city's black community to put an end to the violence that is claiming lives in record numbers.
FEATURES
By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 22, 1998
In a large room in the basement of Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, about 140 church musicians met together the Saturday before last to sing and study.Led by choral conductor Stanley J. Thurston, minister of music at First Baptist Church of Northwest Washington, musicians from churches all over the Baltimore area read through a stack of new sacred choral music.There were gentle two-part songs and spirituals arranged into four-part anthems calculated to fill a church with angelic sound."Oh, this is pretty," sighed Wanda Valentine, who lives in Glen Burnie and sings alto with the choir of St. James Episcopal Church in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Donna W. Payne and Donna W. Payne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 18, 2001
Smiling children joined hands in a "unity circle" to sing their theme song: "Knowledge is Power." They had just finished after-school snacks and were ready to begin another session of learning in a Howard County program that is unique for its partnership with school, business and community. These elementary school children are able to attend the "Learning Center" in Columbia's Rideout Heath townhouses, because it is in their neighborhood. The Rideout Heath location is one of five community-based centers operated through the efforts of the Family and Community Outreach and Black Student Achievement programs of the Howard County school system, the Columbia Housing Corp.
NEWS
By Alia Malik and Alia Malik,Sun reporter | August 10, 2007
Operation Safe Streets, a program run by the city Health Department to prevent violence through community outreach, will expand to an area in the western part of the city, Mayor Sheila Dixon and Health Commissioner Dr. Joshua M. Sharfstein announced yesterday. Since June, the program has been implemented in parts of the McElderry Park and Madison East neighborhoods. The specific location of the new area has not been determined, but it will be in West or Southwest Baltimore and will be determined by homicide and shooting statistics, Dixon said.
SPORTS
By David Steele | September 3, 2005
CARMELO Anthony comes back to Baltimore this summer with a purpose, ready and eager to put it into action. "I'm really trying to be the man in this city," he said. Anthony is much more so now, as he returns to his hometown for a major kickoff event for his charitable foundation, than he was last year, when he came back from a bad experience and soon found himself in an even worse one. By last fall, he was "the man" in a way he'd never expected: the notorious Stop Snitching underground DVD in which he'd had an unwitting cameo had become known, in some quarters, as "the Carmelo video."
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