Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCommunity Mental
IN THE NEWS

Community Mental

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 9, 2009
Opponents of the state's plan to close the Upper Shore Community Mental Health Center in Chestertown have a point that the state has not yet provided sufficient details about how the 200 patients a year who rely on the facility will find adequate care in an area where options are relatively few. But that doesn't mean the closure - part of the aggressive cost-cutting measures that have been required to bridge Maryland's recession-induced budget gaps -...
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 13, 2013
Over 140,000 adults and children with mental illness are served by community-based mental health care providers in Maryland. With the right mix and amount of services and supports, the great majority of these individuals recover from their illness and go on to live quiet, successful lives in the community. As providers we are proud of the critical role we play in helping those who are struggling not only with a devastating illness, but too often with poverty, homelessness and social isolation.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | January 10, 1997
With psychiatric care continuing to move away from hospitalization to community treatment, Sheppard Pratt Health System announced yesterday that Way Station, a community mental health program in Frederick, was becoming part of the Sheppard Pratt system.Way Station will keep its names and programs and will operate as a subsidiary of Sheppard Pratt, which has grown beyond its Towson psychiatric hospital into a variety of outpatient treatment sites.Financial terms were not disclosed."Our overall direction and our vision is to move into the community more," said Dr. Steven S. Sharfstein, chief executive officer of Sheppard Pratt.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | June 26, 2011
Dr. Betty W. Robinson, a psychiatrist who had been director of inpatient services at the Walter P. Carter Center in downtown Baltimore and an associate professor at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, died June 19 of cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The longtime Stoneleigh resident was 84. The daughter of a Baltimore & Ohio Railroad office worker and a bookkeeper, Betty Lee Wilmas was born and raised in St. Louis, where she graduated in 1944 from Wills High School.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2004
Dr. Alice Tobler, a retired top state mental health official who wrote an influential 1960s report advocating reforms in her field, died of congestive heart failure Friday at the Broadmead retirement community in Cockeysville. She was 98 and formerly lived in Guilford. In October 1963, following an initiative of President John F. Kennedy about mental illness and mental retardation, she was named director of Maryland Mental Health Planning. In this capacity she pushed to release the mentally ill from poorly equipped state hospitals while suggesting that patients be treated in community clinics.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Staff Writer | May 14, 1993
Call it the blame game, and Baltimore County's chronic mentally ill are the losers.James W. "Jim" Stockdill, deputy state health director, says the state has provided more money for mental health programs this year -- money for projects the county wanted. So, don't blame the state if local treatment and employment training programs can't be funded.County officials say the state's insistence that the extra money be targeted for specific projects is to blame for the threatened cuts in community mental health programs.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | February 24, 1993
Carroll County's mental health advisory committee voted yesterday to ask the county commissioners to create a new agency with the financial clout to change how county residents receive mental health services.The agency, which would be called a core service agency, is proposed as a private, nonprofit group that would distribute approximately $2.2 million a year that Carroll agencies receive from the state Mental Hygiene Administration to provide community mental health services."The core service agency would have a lot of flexibility and power to distribute or redistribute mental health dollars," said Howard Held, director of the county Health Department's Mental Health Bureau.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | January 20, 1998
Community mental health providers who deliver services to some of Maryland's poorest psychiatric patients say the state's new reimbursement rates are too low and could force some clinics to close.Providers say they have had to lay off employees and eliminate critical services that are not covered under the new public mental health system. The rates took effect July 1."The fees that have been set up for psychiatric clinics are absurdly low," said Spencer Gear, director of Granite House, a psychiatric rehabilitation center in Westminster.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Staff Writer | July 14, 1993
Paul Amonick's 21-year-old son is getting priceless help in controlling his manic-depressive moods and moving toward the independence a job would bring. But the Baltimore County mental health clinic he attends is closing July 30."It's kind of a setback. I'm upset," Mr. Amonick said. He said he hopes that the three weeks left at the Hannah More Day Treatment Center will provide enough improvement so his son can get along with the less-frequent help the county will offer.The closing of the Reisterstown program, which is part of the county's Northwestern Community Mental Health Center, is a dramatic example of the impact of spending cuts in state and county mental health programs.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | May 9, 1997
Committing someone to a psychiatric hospital may appear to be an easy decision and a straightforward procedure. But in reality, it's often a tough call, followed by a series of steps that can get hung up -- and end in tragedy.The bottom line: Until shown to be a danger to self or others, a person can't be committed. And some psychiatrists and family members say it's just too difficult to get someone involuntarily hospitalized in Maryland.Denise Cherry said her husband's physicians had refused to admit him. She partially blamed them for Baron Michael Cherry's being charged with the fatal shooting of a police officer.
NEWS
October 12, 2009
State hasn't made its case The problem with the proposed closure of the Upper Shore Community Mental Health Center is that Health Secretary John Colmers has failed to make the case that shutting this facility will provide less restrictive care at lower cost. First, the secretary gave the wrong patient profile to the Board of Public Works at the time of the closure vote, leaving the impression the facility was just a processing center rather than an important part of the Eastern Shore community.
NEWS
October 9, 2009
Opponents of the state's plan to close the Upper Shore Community Mental Health Center in Chestertown have a point that the state has not yet provided sufficient details about how the 200 patients a year who rely on the facility will find adequate care in an area where options are relatively few. But that doesn't mean the closure - part of the aggressive cost-cutting measures that have been required to bridge Maryland's recession-induced budget gaps -...
NEWS
By C. FRASER SMITH | December 25, 2005
Dear Santa, I'm writing to support two important wish lists. I know you don't need reminding, but there's an ailment out there worse than avian flu. I'm talking about "donor fatigue." I hope it hasn't gotten as far as the North Pole. But it's out there, so your job is doubly difficult. Anyway, here are the lists. They're quite short, actually. Just one item. Five million dollars. Apiece. Yes, Santa, $5 million each. Here's what they tell me. "It's really not a lot of money in the scheme of things."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2004
Dr. Alice Tobler, a retired top state mental health official who wrote an influential 1960s report advocating reforms in her field, died of congestive heart failure Friday at the Broadmead retirement community in Cockeysville. She was 98 and formerly lived in Guilford. In October 1963, following an initiative of President John F. Kennedy about mental illness and mental retardation, she was named director of Maryland Mental Health Planning. In this capacity she pushed to release the mentally ill from poorly equipped state hospitals while suggesting that patients be treated in community clinics.
NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | October 9, 2003
Maryland's top health official proposed yesterday to shrink the state's mental health system by closing the 90-year-old Crownsville Hospital Center in Anne Arundel County and privatizing the Walter P. Carter Center in downtown Baltimore. Shutting Crownsville would force the state to relocate its 200 patients to other facilities and could prompt about 150 layoffs, according to a report by Health Secretary Nelson J. Sabatini. It would also save $5.3 million per year for a state facing an $800 million shortfall next budget year.
NEWS
September 6, 2002
Region isn't ready to host the Olympics Can we please stop blaming geopolitics for the failure of Baltimore-Washington to win a bid for the 2012 Olympics ("D.C. might have scared Olympics," Aug. 29)? The reasons the cities were not chosen are far more basic. These are two cities with horrendous rates of murder and other violent and property crimes; two cities with infrastructures unable to manage the existing, routine commuter and transient traffic; two cities with nonexistent tax bases.
NEWS
October 12, 2009
State hasn't made its case The problem with the proposed closure of the Upper Shore Community Mental Health Center is that Health Secretary John Colmers has failed to make the case that shutting this facility will provide less restrictive care at lower cost. First, the secretary gave the wrong patient profile to the Board of Public Works at the time of the closure vote, leaving the impression the facility was just a processing center rather than an important part of the Eastern Shore community.
NEWS
September 6, 2002
Region isn't ready to host the Olympics Can we please stop blaming geopolitics for the failure of Baltimore-Washington to win a bid for the 2012 Olympics ("D.C. might have scared Olympics," Aug. 29)? The reasons the cities were not chosen are far more basic. These are two cities with horrendous rates of murder and other violent and property crimes; two cities with infrastructures unable to manage the existing, routine commuter and transient traffic; two cities with nonexistent tax bases.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.