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By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | October 14, 2013
Elected officials and community leaders are calling on Giant Food to improve service and quality at the Waverly Crossroads store, which serves north and northeast Baltimore, including Oakenshawe, Abell, Guilford and Charles Village. They are circulating petitions and forming a steering committee as part of a public campaign called Friends of a Giant Step Forward. Their petition asks Giant Food "to maintain the quality we expect and deserve, with enough staff to keep checkout lines short, better stocking of shelves, the highest quality meats and produce, and a safe, uncongested entryway and parking lot. " They say it's an effort to convince corporate representatives of the Prince George's County-based supermarket chain to meet with them.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and Yvonne Wenger and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
Baltimore City Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young came under fire Wednesday as critics charged that he pushed his favored candidate through a committee appointed to fill a vacant council seat. A committee of community leaders, appointed by Young, listened to more than four hours of testimony Tuesday evening from 14 candidates for the seat - and in less than five minutes agreed to nominate Federal Hill Neighborhood Association President Eric T. Costello, who was supported by Young.
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NEWS
August 18, 1996
Union National Bank has named three more community leaders to sit on the board of its new Eldersburg branch.Dann Finch of Westminster is the manager of sales, service, parts and rental at Finch services in Eldersburg. Michelle Fleming of Eldersburg is secretary/treasurer for Fleming Petroleum Service Inc. Brian Haight of Finksburg is a partner in the family owned and operated Haight Funeral Home in Sykesville.Pub Date: 8/18/96
NEWS
September 2, 2014
The recent dramatic rise in heroin overdose deaths has reached near epidemic levels in Maryland ( "Overdose deaths are preventable," Aug. 29). The commentary by Deanna Wilson, Stephanie Sparrow and Jennifer Kirschner is an important follow up to the views expressed by Sun columnist Dan Rodricks , who questioned the accuracy of the reported number of heroin addicts in Baltimore ( "Heroin capital claim based on an old, bad number," Aug. 28). Regrettably, it appears that the rest of America has caught up with Baltimore's widespread substance abuse problem.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff writer | April 17, 1991
Home to quiet, tree-lined streets, government offices and "honey bee" specials. Church capital of the county. A neighborhood of car dealerships and old-fashioned bakeries, an international airport and parks.When 22 community leaders and longtime Glen Burnie residents satdown to talk about their hometown, they quickly listed the same attractions.They came from every walk of life. They live in different sections of town, some in single-family homes in the older center of town, others in more modern subdivisions.
NEWS
January 10, 1996
WITH THE appointment of Diane Bell as president of Empower Baltimore, pessimism among some Baltimore neighborhood leaders about their role in this project has turned to optimism. They believe their complaints have led to better cooperation with the business-oriented members of the empowerment zone board.That is good to hear. Baltimore's success last year in winning a coveted empowerment zone grant was due in part to heavy business-community-government interaction. The success of the program will hinge on making that cooperation an on-going reality.
NEWS
By Paul Shread and Paul Shread,Staff writer | April 28, 1991
Harold Greene, executive director of the Annapolis Housing Authority, had lunch with one of his most vocal critics, Rosalie Mitchell, president of the Harbour House tenants council.Nick Kallis, the attorney for downtown tavern owners, talked with Wendy Beavers, a leader in the College Creek and Obery Terrace public housing communities.Downtown residents and tavern owners -- often at odds -- agreed to meet regularly and work to solve problems. Police officers and public housing residents talked about reclaiming their communities from drug dealers.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | January 22, 2004
Anne Arundel County Executive Janet S. Owens' administration spent nearly $3,200 copying and mailing a snow removal video, which was criticized at a County Council meeting on Tuesday. "If we are so tight on money in this county, why was this mailed to me as well as all the other community leaders?" asked Marie Cook of the Provinces Civic Association in Severn. County officials said yesterday that they made 1,000 copies of the videotape and mailed it this month to 867 community associations.
NEWS
By Jon Meoli, jmeoli@tribune.com | January 21, 2014
Representatives from the Loch Raven Village and the Knettishall communities emerged from a meeting Friday with Baltimore County Public Schools Superintendent Dallas Dance as strident as ever in their opposition to a plan calling for reopening a school at the site of the former Loch Raven Elementary despite assurances that a revised plan addresses some of their concerns. "We heard their feedback and aside from just not doing the school, which would be their ultimate goal, we adjusted our thinking of what it should look like based on what they said to us," Dance said in an interview after the meeting.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | June 9, 2005
The hulking structure is more than six decades old, and it's on a valuable parcel of land that's about to go on the auction block. But Baltimore County officials and community leaders see the old airplane factory now known as the Middle River Depot as an architectural jewel and a statement of the area's heritage, and they want it to survive the sale. The building, once the plant where Glenn L. Martin Co. manufactured the B-26 "Marauder" bomber during World War II, has been in recent decades a federal government repository for tons of pamphlets, manuals and records.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2014
As the Station North arts and entertainment district matures, community leaders are setting their sights on another long-promised part of the neighborhood's renaissance - market-rate apartments. The neighborhood, once a handful of nightspots surrounded by seedy parking lots, has grown into a small hotbed of restaurants, theaters and bars, with activity pushing up Charles Street and east and west along North Avenue and thousands flooding the area this summer for concerts and other events.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
An Anne Arundel County woman once honored for her activism pleaded guilty Thursday to misusing nearly $74,000 of her community association's money. Wanda Brooks Hebron pleaded guilty to one count of theft scheme of more than $500 in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court. Assistant State's Attorney Michael Cogan said that from 2002 through 2009, Hebron used a debit card belonging to the Stillmeadows Condominium Association in Severn to make $73,943.12 worth of purchases at restaurants, gas stations and drug stores, and to pay cellphone bills.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2014
The Mount Vernon neighborhood will hold a memorial service for a neighborhood community leader who died on Friday, after being critically wounded in a 2012 shooting outside a small inn and residence next to the Belvedere Hotel. The community will hold a memorial service for Lawrence Peterson at 5 p.m on Sunday, May 18, in the West Square of Mount Vernon Place. It is the same venue where a vigil was held for Peterson when he was wounded after the shooting Following the memorial service, the community will stage a block party to celebrate Peterson's life in the unit block of East Chase Street.
NEWS
By Jon Meoli, jmeoli@tribune.com | April 14, 2014
York Road is the main thoroughfare in downtown Towson and those commuters who travel it on a daily basis know the congestion around the intersection of York and Burke Avenue during rush hour. The crossroads have been deemed by the county as a failing intersection, meaning congestion is a critical issue because the crossroads cannot handle the amount of vehicles it sees at a given time. However, Baltimore County officials say the stretch of York Road just north of Burke Avenue is exempt from a development moratorium in place near failing intersections — according to its annual Basic Services Map, which designates infrastructure and traffic needs across the county.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2014
Tourists never come to see the cherry blossoms in West Baltimore, in the heart of what local residents warmly refer to as "the hood. " But they could, as far as Marvin "Doc" Cheatham is concerned. "We could have people ride through, neighbors selling hot dogs and hamburgers, saying, 'You don't got to go to Washington for cherry blossoms!'" Cheatham said this weekend from his front steps in the 1600 block of Appleton St. The block has about 40 occupied homes, 11 boarded-up vacants, and about a dozen cherry trees - planted by the city in the 1970s, as Cheatham recalls.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | April 8, 2014
Situated in the extreme northeastern corner of the small Baltic Sea nation of Estonia, on the western bank of a river that serves as an international border with Russia, the town of Narva is on its nation's Route 1, and it is relatively small. Bel Air, on U.S. Route 1 and a relatively small town, has little in common with Narva. Leaders of the two communities, however, signed a sister city agreement last week via an Internet video connection. As a practical matter, having a sister city is a largely meaningless gesture.
NEWS
By GADY A. EPSTEIN and GADY A. EPSTEIN,SUN STAFF | November 28, 2000
Like the residents of this 33-year- old town, Jim Robey and Padraic Kennedy see two different Columbias -- one grappling with urban decay, the other prospering. Kennedy, who led the town for 26 years as the first president of the Columbia Association, sees a thriving town with a few minor issues that surely will be resolved. But Robey, the Howard County executive, is distressed about older neighborhoods in decline, with school and crime problems in need of immediate attention. Their divergent perceptions reflect broader disagreement in the community over how much must be done, and how urgently.
NEWS
By Erica C. Harrington and Erica C. Harrington,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Alex Gordon contributed to this article | July 23, 1996
Concerned about robberies in three Columbia villages, Howard County Police have assigned 15 uniformed and plainclothes officers to patrol them for the next 10 weeks, in a program that could be used elsewhere in the county if needed.The Robbery Suppression Program -- which began with no fanfare Thursday -- concentrates on the villages of Long Reach, Oakland Mills and Town Center, all of which "are historically busier with robberies," said Sgt. Steven Keller.Led by Lt. William McMahon, commander of the department's special operations division, the program will combine the efforts of detectives and narcotics officers, as well as the regular patrol, to find possible connections between the robberies and other types of crimes.
NEWS
February 2, 2014
A week ago we faced the reality of a previously unimaginable tragedy. It was not unimaginable because of the scope of its violence, the premature taking of precious lives, or the shadow of fear cast over the hundreds of families enjoying the warm comfort of a community gathering space on a cold winter day. Tragedies like these are, sadly, all too real and all too common. What was, and what still is, unimaginable is that it could happen here; that it happened here. We are not the first and we certainly will not be the last community to confront such an unimaginable reality.
NEWS
By Jon Meoli, jmeoli@tribune.com | January 21, 2014
Representatives from the Loch Raven Village and the Knettishall communities emerged from a meeting Friday with Baltimore County Public Schools Superintendent Dallas Dance as strident as ever in their opposition to a plan calling for reopening a school at the site of the former Loch Raven Elementary despite assurances that a revised plan addresses some of their concerns. "We heard their feedback and aside from just not doing the school, which would be their ultimate goal, we adjusted our thinking of what it should look like based on what they said to us," Dance said in an interview after the meeting.
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