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By Sloane Brown | December 16, 2001
The warmth in the Belvedere Hotel ballroom had less to do with the heating system than with the generous spirit that filled the room. Lots of handshakes and hugs as some 200 guests gathered for the Community Law Center's 15th anniversary awards banquet. Folks came to celebrate the group's efforts in providing legal, technical and educational help to Baltimore's community-based organizations, and to honor CLC founding members including Clinton Bamberger, J. Randall Carroll, Mike Pretl and Jamey H. Weitzman.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
A Baltimore City Circuit Court judge has ordered an absentee Baltimore landlord to clean up about 50 blighted properties within 90 days, the first ruling since a state law was amended two years ago to make it easier for community groups to sue the owners of problem properties. Judge Pamela J. White found that 49 properties owned by Scott Wizig and corporate affiliates represented legal nuisances, with "unsafe and uninhabitable" conditions that have not been fixed despite requests by community groups and notices of violations of the building code.
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NEWS
January 16, 1997
BALTIMORE'S NON-PROFIT Community Law Center is 10 years old. Instead of throwing a big birthday party, the organization celebrated the milestone by publishing a manual that tells what it has learned about legal actions that can be used to revitalize neighborhoods."
NEWS
By Christina L. Schoppert | June 6, 2010
I grew up in Homeland in North Baltimore — a strong neighborhood by most measurements and a wonderful place to be a child. But it was also missing something. In the summertime, as a teenager, I used to like to drive south on York Road to Greenmount, go east on North Avenue, and south on North Patterson Park Avenue. I was unaware of potential accusations of voyeurism; I just knew that it was a lot more fun when it was hot outside to be on a street where people are sitting on their stoops or on lawn chairs on the sidewalk, exchanging stories and selling and eating snowballs, than it was to be stuck in an air-conditioned living room in North Baltimore.
NEWS
May 7, 1993
An unusual auction took place recently on the steps of the Clarence E. Mitchell Courthouse. Four abandoned houses, removed from their owners and ordered into receivership by the District Court, were auctioned to developers eager to rehabilitate them into residential units.This kind of legal redistribution of vacant houses will become a routine procedure in coming months. A total of 71 other vacant houses are to be auctioned by Save A. Neighborhood Inc., a non-profit organization the Community Law Center created to help the court dispose of vacant problem houses under a new city receivership law.The Community Law Center is using this new weapon quite successfully.
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | February 2, 1998
Southern Park Heights residents and activists involved in rebuilding their decaying Northwest Baltimore community took time yesterday to celebrate its spirit."
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Evening Sun Staff | January 17, 1992
A recent change in Baltimore's building code allows the city and community leaders to take control of vacant houses from absentee owners and turn them over to non-profit developers for renovation.The city housing department, in conjunction with the non-profit Community Law Center, filed suit in District Court yesterday against the owners of two rowhouses in East Baltimore.The suit asks the court to appoint the Middle East Community Development Organization as a receiver of the properties so they can be renovated and sold to families in the community, which is located near Johns Hopkins Hospital.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Sun Staff Writer | May 1, 1994
Joyce Smith remembers when drug trafficking was so blatant at one vacant house in the 1700 block of W. Fayette St. that dealers would hang an "open and closed for business" sign at the entrance.Since then, the city has razed the house. Now the site is occupied by a garden in the shape of Africa that blooms with tulips and daffodils.Yesterday, the president of the Franklin Square Community Association described her successful campaign to rid her West Baltimore neighborhood of drugs and vacant houses during the Citizens Planning and Housing Association's second annual Neighbor-to-Neighbor Expo.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,Sun reporter | April 18, 2008
The "We Buy Houses" signs plastered illegally across the city drive Robert Strupp crazy. It is not merely that they are ugly. Strupp, with the Community Law Center in Baltimore, sees them as neighborhood destabilizers that make it easier for real estate predators to find prey - but it is not just that, either. No, it is that the city has yet to enforce a nearly two-year-old law allowing citizens who tear them down to take them to city officials so the authorities can fine the sign owners.
NEWS
By From staff reports | August 27, 1997
Cocaine killed an intruder who was beaten by neighbors after he broke into a rowhouse this month in the 300 block of Marydell Road in Southwest Baltimore, according to the deputy chief state medical examiner.Nathaniel McFadden, 42, of the 2500 block of McHenry St. died of cocaine intoxication with contributing blunt force injuries, but the blunt force injuries were not life-threatening, said Dr. Ann Dixon, deputy chief state medical examiner.McFadden died Aug. 3, hours after he allegedly broke into Linda Force's residence about 1: 30 a.m. and was attacked outside by neighbors who responded to her cries for help.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,Sun reporter | April 18, 2008
The "We Buy Houses" signs plastered illegally across the city drive Robert Strupp crazy. It is not merely that they are ugly. Strupp, with the Community Law Center in Baltimore, sees them as neighborhood destabilizers that make it easier for real estate predators to find prey - but it is not just that, either. No, it is that the city has yet to enforce a nearly two-year-old law allowing citizens who tear them down to take them to city officials so the authorities can fine the sign owners.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | December 16, 2001
The warmth in the Belvedere Hotel ballroom had less to do with the heating system than with the generous spirit that filled the room. Lots of handshakes and hugs as some 200 guests gathered for the Community Law Center's 15th anniversary awards banquet. Folks came to celebrate the group's efforts in providing legal, technical and educational help to Baltimore's community-based organizations, and to honor CLC founding members including Clinton Bamberger, J. Randall Carroll, Mike Pretl and Jamey H. Weitzman.
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | February 2, 1998
Southern Park Heights residents and activists involved in rebuilding their decaying Northwest Baltimore community took time yesterday to celebrate its spirit."
NEWS
By From staff reports | August 27, 1997
Cocaine killed an intruder who was beaten by neighbors after he broke into a rowhouse this month in the 300 block of Marydell Road in Southwest Baltimore, according to the deputy chief state medical examiner.Nathaniel McFadden, 42, of the 2500 block of McHenry St. died of cocaine intoxication with contributing blunt force injuries, but the blunt force injuries were not life-threatening, said Dr. Ann Dixon, deputy chief state medical examiner.McFadden died Aug. 3, hours after he allegedly broke into Linda Force's residence about 1: 30 a.m. and was attacked outside by neighbors who responded to her cries for help.
NEWS
By David Mark and David Mark,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | March 25, 1997
Jahiri Gunthorpe, age 10, remembers last summer as a typical one in Harlem Park that included witnessing a shooting in front of his home. But Jahiri is not the type to let crime and drugs in his community engulf him.Last summer, he decided to help other youths -- including his twin brother, Rafik -- plant and tend a garden to make his community more appealing."
NEWS
January 16, 1997
BALTIMORE'S NON-PROFIT Community Law Center is 10 years old. Instead of throwing a big birthday party, the organization celebrated the milestone by publishing a manual that tells what it has learned about legal actions that can be used to revitalize neighborhoods."
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Evening Sun Staff | July 19, 1991
Baltimore neighborhood activists have found a new tool for fighting owners of dilapidated vacant houses.A recent court ruling has made it possible for the owners of vacant houses to be sued under the state's nuisance law and forced to either occupy the houses or to turn them over to a community group for renovations.Late last month, Circuit Court Judge Joseph H.H. Kaplan ruled in favor of community leaders in West Baltimore's Harlem Park who were fighting the owner of a vacant rowhouse on the 700 block of N. Carrollton Ave.Kaplan gave the owner 90 days, starting on June 21, to repair all housing code violations and to obtain an occupancy certificate from the city.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Sun Staff Writer | May 1, 1994
Joyce Smith remembers when drug trafficking was so blatant at one vacant house in the 1700 block of W. Fayette St. that dealers would hang an "open and closed for business" sign at the entrance.Since then, the city has razed the house. Now the site is occupied by a garden in the shape of Africa that blooms with tulips and daffodils.Yesterday, the president of the Franklin Square Community Association described her successful campaign to rid her West Baltimore neighborhood of drugs and vacant houses during the Citizens Planning and Housing Association's second annual Neighbor-to-Neighbor Expo.
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