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NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | February 16, 1993
State budget cuts have forced county health officials to stop surveying older Carroll communities for septic tank failures, which could mean that nobody will spot a need for a public sewage system to protect community health."
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NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | June 17, 2007
Talk about your welcoming committee. As hundreds of guests at Zoomerang! 2007 arrived at the Maryland Zoo's main gate, they were not only greeted by party chairs Stuart and Suzanne Amos and zoo president Billie Grieb, but also by a few "animal ambassadors," including camels, a rooster, a baby alligator and a toucan. "Oooh, I love penguins," trilled Zoo board member Carole Sibel, as she spotted one trotting after its keeper. "There's a little owl called Pellet, who's the cutest little thing I've ever seen," cooed Celeste Corsaro, marketing director of Baltimore Eats.
NEWS
March 11, 2011
Care for cancer patients The Wellness House of Annapolis offers services and programs to assist those living with cancer and their relatives, including children. Walk-in hours are 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesdays and 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesdays. All classes and services are free for cancer patients, caregivers and families. Pre-registration is required. The Wellness House is at 2625 Mas Que Farm Road. Appointments: 410-990-0941 or wellnesshouse@comcast.net . New community health e-mail alert system The county Department of Health has a new community health e-mail alert system to provide timely notices about department services and community health issues.
FEATURES
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,Sun Reporter | October 25, 2007
Oretha T. Wondee had gotten her family safely out of the West African country of Liberia, where 14 years of war had surrounded them with violence, ruined the economy and cost hundreds of thousands their homes. But as a new refugee in Baltimore nine months ago, she began to see threats of a different kind to her five children. She didn't know how to ward off illness and infection. She didn't know where to go if someone had a toothache. She'd never heard of 911. Wondee got some of the basics from the nonprofit group that resettled her in Baltimore.
NEWS
June 25, 2012
Regarding your article about the city's plan to strip some liquor stores of their licenses, many studies have shown that communities with greater densities of alcohol outlets have higher levels of drinking, unintentional injuries and violence ("Baltimore to strip some liquor stores of licenses in rezoning effort," June 18). Specifically, published data about Baltimore show not only an inequitable distribution of liquor stores in predominantly African-American and low-income communities but also significant associations between the presence of liquor stores and the risk of health-related problems.
NEWS
By Anne S. Kasper and Leni Preston | November 6, 2009
After ducking the nation's health care crisis for many years, Congress finally stands on the verge of passing comprehensive health reform. Each of several bills on the table would build on our existing public-private system to bring us much closer to making comprehensive, high-quality health care available to all Americans. Maryland is the wealthiest state in the nation. Yet almost one in five residents is uninsured or underinsured, and many more are just one medical bill from bankruptcy or foreclosure.
NEWS
By Catherine E. Pugh and Dan K. Morhaim | March 10, 2014
This summer, Gov. Martin O'Malley and public health leaders justly celebrated the fact that infant mortality in our state has been driven to a new record low. By increasing access to care and outreach for new mothers and their babies - particularly in low-income communities - Maryland's infant mortality rate fell by 21 percent between 2008 and 2012. This is a tremendous achievement. But this hard won progress - as well as access for all expectant mothers - is at risk as we confront a looming obstetrics crisis: multi-million dollar medical malpractice judgments that are driving even higher the already high cost of medical liability.
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