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By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,Sun Reporter | October 25, 2007
Oretha T. Wondee had gotten her family safely out of the West African country of Liberia, where 14 years of war had surrounded them with violence, ruined the economy and cost hundreds of thousands their homes. But as a new refugee in Baltimore nine months ago, she began to see threats of a different kind to her five children. She didn't know how to ward off illness and infection. She didn't know where to go if someone had a toothache. She'd never heard of 911. Wondee got some of the basics from the nonprofit group that resettled her in Baltimore.
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NEWS
December 23, 2011
Free cookbook The Learn to Live program of the Department of Health has a new healthful eating kit that features a free cookbook and tips that will help you select foods high in fiber and low in fat and sodium. Recipes are also quick, easy and economical. Information: visit http://www.LearntoLiveHealthy.org or call 410-222-7979. Tobacco sales compliance The health department's Learn to Live program offers to retailers a tobacco sales compliance kit. The kit includes a training guide that explains Maryland's tobacco laws.
NEWS
June 25, 2012
Regarding your article about the city's plan to strip some liquor stores of their licenses, many studies have shown that communities with greater densities of alcohol outlets have higher levels of drinking, unintentional injuries and violence ("Baltimore to strip some liquor stores of licenses in rezoning effort," June 18). Specifically, published data about Baltimore show not only an inequitable distribution of liquor stores in predominantly African-American and low-income communities but also significant associations between the presence of liquor stores and the risk of health-related problems.
NEWS
By Anne S. Kasper and Leni Preston | November 6, 2009
After ducking the nation's health care crisis for many years, Congress finally stands on the verge of passing comprehensive health reform. Each of several bills on the table would build on our existing public-private system to bring us much closer to making comprehensive, high-quality health care available to all Americans. Maryland is the wealthiest state in the nation. Yet almost one in five residents is uninsured or underinsured, and many more are just one medical bill from bankruptcy or foreclosure.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,SUN STAFF | December 16, 2004
Politicians do it all the time: target churches to reach African-Americans. But instead of wooing voters, health care advocates hope to tap into the power of black clergy to educate blacks on health problems gripping their communities. St. Agnes HealthCare and the foundation of former Orioles star and cancer survivor Eric Davis announced yesterday that they have teamed up on a three-year program to educate ministers on diseases that disproportionately affect blacks. "We are going directly to the leaders," said Angela Hunt, executive director of the Eric Davis Foundation, a nonprofit group born after the Oriole outfielder's colorectal cancer was diagnosed in 1997.
NEWS
By Catherine E. Pugh and Dan K. Morhaim | March 10, 2014
This summer, Gov. Martin O'Malley and public health leaders justly celebrated the fact that infant mortality in our state has been driven to a new record low. By increasing access to care and outreach for new mothers and their babies - particularly in low-income communities - Maryland's infant mortality rate fell by 21 percent between 2008 and 2012. This is a tremendous achievement. But this hard won progress - as well as access for all expectant mothers - is at risk as we confront a looming obstetrics crisis: multi-million dollar medical malpractice judgments that are driving even higher the already high cost of medical liability.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2010
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake plans to announce Wednesday that Baltimore's next health commissioner will be a veteran public health official from New York City, one who began her life in the South Bronx projects but went on to attend Yale and train as a pediatrician. Oxiris Barbot was chosen from a list of more than 40 candidates to replace Joshua Sharfstein, who left last year to become principal deputy commissioner at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. For the past seven years, Barbot has served as the medical director of New York City's Office of School Health, a program run jointly by the health and education departments.
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