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By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
Baltimore was among dozens of disappointed cities when Google announced it had picked Kansas City, Mo., for a high-speed fiber-optic data network in 2011, but officials vowed to continue fighting for fiber nonetheless. Nearly four years later, some are disappointed by the lack of progress— and want to show that some of the fervor that wooed Google remains, waiting for new, affordable options for fast Internet service. A community group based in North Baltimore has attracted more than 900 people and nearly $17,000 in donations to a crowdsourced campaign, the Baltimore Broadband Coalition.
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BUSINESS
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
Baltimore was among dozens of disappointed cities when Google announced it had picked Kansas City, Mo., for a high-speed fiber-optic data network in 2011, but officials vowed to continue fighting for fiber nonetheless. Nearly four years later, some are disappointed by the lack of progress— and want to show that some of the fervor that wooed Google remains, waiting for new, affordable options for fast Internet service. A community group based in North Baltimore has attracted more than 900 people and nearly $17,000 in donations to a crowdsourced campaign, the Baltimore Broadband Coalition.
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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2013
A Catonsville community association is appealing Baltimore County's approval of plans for a new medical office building, saying the developer's recent conviction in a campaign finance case invalidates the entire review process. In documents filed last week, the Kenwood Gardens Condominium Association argues the project is tainted by Steve W. Whalen Jr.'s illegal contributions to county politicians. The group opposes the Southwest Physicians Pavilion, planned for Kenwood Avenue off the Baltimore Beltway.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
To his friends and supporters, Eric T. Costello is just what the City Council needs: a smart, hard-working community president with financial experience that could save taxpayers money. To his critics, however, Costello is just what Baltimore doesn't need: an ambitious, sometimes volatile leader more interested in pleasing the powerful than his neighborhood's residents. Costello, 33, a New York native, has been a magnet for controversy during his relatively short tenure in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2013
Climb the steps and walk past the concrete columns that grace many Baltimore police stations and you'll encounter shuttered glass doors, blocked off by plywood, brown paper or the backs of file cabinets. Somewhere along the way, the public entrances to four of the city's nine district stations became casualties as police outgrew their space, with citizens instead directed to rear doors where officers and handcuffed suspects come and go. That will change in the Northwestern District on Reisterstown Road this week.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2013
Inside the former Barclay Recreation Center on Saturday, the smell of fumes filled the air as a band of volunteers spent the morning putting on a fresh coat of paint in anticipation of its reopening under new management later this year. The city's Department of Recreation and Parks shut down the center last August after 32 years and handed it over to the neighboring Barclay Elementary and Middle School. Volunteers from the area finally started working earlier this year to get the facility back up and running.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Sun Staff Writer | February 20, 1994
One of Baltimore's largest community groups is threatening to evict a municipal agency from its headquarters after city workers came there Thursday and changed locks, moved furniture and commandeered additional office space.Lois A. Garey, executive director of the HARBEL community group, compared the city's methods to "Gestapo tactics," and City Council President Mary Pat Clarke accused the city of "fiscal thuggery."The confrontation grows out of a months-old dispute between the city Department of Housing and Community Development and officials of HARBEL, which includes 92 community associations in Northeast Baltimore and nearby sections of Baltimore County.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | September 29, 1995
Washington businessman Kingdon Gould filed a petition this week to dig a quarry in Jessup, but the president of a community group near the site says he's not ready to sign an agreement the developer made with the community because of concerns about the document."
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | June 4, 2000
Less than a month after racial tensions flared at Southern High School with parents questioning the actions of its principal, parents and community members are scheduled to meet again tomorrow in hopes of establishing a community group to deal with issues at the Harwood school. Parents and residents are expected at the meeting set for 7 p.m. at Carter United Methodist Church in Friendship. School Principal Cliff Prince and other school district officials are also expected to attend. "Hopefully, we'll establish a community group" from the meeting, said Patti Harvey, who helped organize the first meeting for parents three weeks ago. "A lot of parents are saying we need to support [Prince]
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,Sun reporter | January 21, 2008
Bill Lagna doesn't feel he's leading a coup. As the first president of a community group created in the wake of a divisive plan to build condominiums at a weathered marina in Bowleys Quarters, Lagna says the goal is to unify residents on the eastern Baltimore County peninsula. "The intent of the group is to try to come up with acceptable developments that will fit in with the general theme of the existing neighborhood," says Lagna, president of the new Bowleys Quarters Community Association.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
Baltimore officials plan to divert $3 million in anticipated casino revenue that had been earmarked for community improvements to replace a major artery in the city's underground steam pipe system. The proposal has drawn criticism from local elected officials and community leaders who say it is a misuse of the funds to be generated by the new Horseshoe Casino Baltimore. They want the money to be used for neighborhood-oriented projects, such as walking trails or efforts to connect unemployed residents with jobs.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
Florence H. Deitz, a Randallstown community activist who was a founder in the 1960s of the old Baltimore County General Hospital, which later became Northwest Hospital, died Monday of cancer at the Fairhaven retirement community. She was 91. "Florence was a truly classic woman. She was gracious and exceptionally talented," said Gene Friedman, who was chairman in 1968 of the Baltimore County General Hospital Foundation. "She was always well-dressed, available to talk, and spoke beautifully," said Mr. Friedman.
NEWS
May 8, 2014
If you're not paying attention, the notion of a community group coming out against mulching facilities in eco-friendly Howard County might have you scratching your head. What appears to have started innocently last summer during the comprehensive zoning process to allow mulching facilities, sawmills and firewood processing facilities on agriculturally preserved land as a way of helping farming ended up leaving a gaping loophole, residents have said. And while any mulching facility is considered a conditional use, meaning it would have to be approved by a hearing examiner, a residents' group worries that the new regulations don't specifically limit the size of these facilities.
BUSINESS
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2014
If it wasn't for the large, well-equipped woodworking shop at the Broadmead retirement community in Cockeysville, Lawrence Schneider might never have embarked upon his third career as a sculptor. But when Schneider moved into the Hunt Valley community 10 years ago, he found an extensive studio for residents featuring a top-notch table saw, a large lathe and a floor-to-ceiling vacuum to suck up the dust. He also discovered his longtime hobby had aesthetic merit. "Previously, I never thought of what I was doing as art," the 79-year-old said.
NEWS
March 10, 2014
Your story regarding a proposed outlet mall in White Marsh quoted Allen Robertson as a representative of a community group in Bowleys Quarters that would be affected by the development ( "Developer eyes outlet mall along I-95 in White Marsh," Jan. 24). Bowleys Quarters is located several miles from the proposed site and is at least a 15-minute drive away. I would urge your reporters and editors to take a look at a map before deciding who you solicit comments from. Had you done so you would have easily determined that Mr. Robertson and his group are no more affected by potential traffic from this project than would be the residents of Towson, Essex, Middle River or other areas within that 15-minute zone.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | September 17, 2013
A broad coalition of environmental and other groups urged Gov. Martin O'Malley Tuesday to oppose development of a natural gas export terminal on the Chesapeake Bay, calling it an unacceptable environmental and safety threat. Members of the coalition, which includes more than 120 local, statewide and national groups, gathered outside the Maryland Public Service Commission offices just before noon to outline their concerns over the proposed liquefied natural gas (LNG) export facility at Cove Point in Calvert County.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | September 14, 1996
A community group has been formed to unite and represent the residents of Baltimore's Little Italy, a neighborhood long divided over parking problems and legal disputes."
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | September 6, 1991
Baltimore businessman Gus Diakoulas' plan to turn the area around North Avenue and Howard Street into a full-fledged "design district" by taking control of a city-owned parcel in the 2100 block of North Howard Street has won the endorsement of the Charles North Community Association.The Rev. Dale Dusman, pastor of St. Mark's Lutheran Church and president of the community group, said that an eight-member advisory group from the community unanimously recommended that the city sell a 52,000-square-foot parcel at the southeast corner of Howard and 21st streets to the owners of the Design Resource Center at 200 W. North Ave. Two other bidders also want the parcel.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2013
Climb the steps and walk past the concrete columns that grace many Baltimore police stations and you'll encounter shuttered glass doors, blocked off by plywood, brown paper or the backs of file cabinets. Somewhere along the way, the public entrances to four of the city's nine district stations became casualties as police outgrew their space, with citizens instead directed to rear doors where officers and handcuffed suspects come and go. That will change in the Northwestern District on Reisterstown Road this week.
NEWS
June 26, 2013
The Flier article June 13 announcing the retirement of Vic Broccolino, president and CEO of Howard County General Hospital, touched on many of the admirable qualities that made him a successful hospital administrator and respected member of our community. I would like to add to that list. Several years ago, a community group, the ER Committee of the Howard County Citizens Association, requested a meeting with Vic Broccolino to discuss the problems of unacceptably long waits in the hospital's ER and of ambulances being diverted to other hospitals because of overcrowding.
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