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By Bob Allen | August 14, 2012
With its rolling lawns and stately trees, the grounds of Babcock Presbyterian Church, just off busy Loch Raven Boulevard, is like an urban oasis. On a sweltering early August morning, a cool breeze sweeps across a grassy knoll behind the church building. The open space along Loch Ness Road is contoured with a dozen small, rectangular garden plots where squash, cucumbers, tomatoes and cantaloupes ripen on the vine and an occasional rabbit darts across the lawn and into the trees. The little plots, most about the size of a large dining room table, are part of the community garden project that Babcock Church started last year.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Allison Eatough, For The Baltimore Sun and By Allison Eatough, For The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2014
Each spring, potted herbs and vegetables dot the fire escape of Steve Kelly's home in Mount Vernon. He grows anywhere from six to nine types of peppers, ranging from red and yellow to cayenne and banana. His herbs include basil, tarragon, chives, rosemary and thyme. And then there's the mint. Kelly grows three kinds: orange mint, spearmint and peppermint. He uses them in tea, water and the occasional "adult beverage," he said. "I throw [herbs] in almost everything I make," Kelly said.
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EXPLORE
August 13, 2012
A committee has been formed headed by a Master Gardener to organize the development of a community garden in Laurel. A community garden; what a wonderful addition to an area that already offer many opportunities for citizens to meet, greet and enjoin in recreation, entertainment, socialization, business endeavors and other good causes. Now a community garden: Wow! That's an opportunity to grow food for ourselves and to share it. A location and a "go ahead" from city officials is still working itself out. The technical expertise of planting and cultivating is already in our backyard.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Allison Eatough, For The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2014
The Bard family loves tooling around Columbia on bikes, whether it's to visit the library or attend an event at the lakefront. It's a healthy way to go, but the family of five noticed that when they arrived at their destinations, the food offerings were not exactly green or clean. "At the summer concerts at the [Columbia] lakefront, the only food there was the ice cream truck," said Luda Bard. "Unless you bring your own food, there's nothing else to eat. " So Bard and her husband, Aaron, and their children Ammi, Ari and Ellie, always brought their own healthy snacks.
EXPLORE
March 6, 2012
City officials are looking at the feasibility of establishing a community garden in Laurel, which could be available for planting in spring 2013. The effort, spearheaded by council member Frederick Smalls and supported by Mayor Craig Moe, is in response to Laurel residents who asked that a community garden be established, according to city officials. The Parks and Recreation Citizens Advisory Committee will review various requirements for a community garden, including where it could be located; the size of individual plots; and fees, rules and regulations for participants.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | July 3, 2013
Baltimore City has awarded "an exclusive negotiating privilege" to an urban farming collective to buy two vacant, city-owned lots near a community garden in Hampden. The collective, Baltimore Free Farm, is trying to buy the lots to prevent their development. The group was one of two bidders for the lots last month; the other is a developer, who has expressed interest in building housing on both lots, according to Baltimore Housing, which is selling the lots through its Vacants to Value program to encourage re-investment in properties in the city that suffer from neglect, abandonment and blight.
NEWS
By Jennifer S. Williams and Jennifer S. Williams,Contributing writer | April 21, 1991
"I do this because I need to dig in the soil," says Gail Barbosa, explaining why she spends weeks each spring toiling over a garden plot two miles from her King's Contrivance home.Ask other gardeners what draws them to Columbia's three community garden sites and a variety of reasons unfold. Some want truly fresh, vine-ripened produce -- "real" tomatoes top the list.Others are trying to keep down their grocery bills by growing their own vegetables. A few, including some immigrants from Southeast Asia, are growing exotic vegetables and herbs not available in stores here.
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | December 17, 2001
The city Planning Commission has given final design approval to site plans for the $53 million Broadway Homes development, with one caveat to developers and city housing officials: Deal with the radishes. At issue is a 5,000-square-foot community garden at Fairmount Avenue and Caroline Street. In March, the city agreed to swap the land with Leonard Smith, owner of Smith Auto Glass. Smith's business, in the first block of N. Caroline St., is losing a parking lot as part of a larger land deal involving Johns Hopkins Hospital, the Housing Authority of Baltimore City and Landex Corp.
NEWS
By Ruma Kumar and Ruma Kumar,SUN REPORTER | April 15, 2007
A West Baltimore community garden - suffering from years of neglect after contractors used it to dump building materials - turned into a political stump yesterday as some of the city's top officials vowed aggressive prosecution of illegal dumping and announced a renewed focus on preserving gardens to help quell crime and revitalize neighborhoods. Mayor Sheila Dixon, City Councilman and mayoral candidate Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr. and City Council hopeful Adam S. Meister, who is campaigning to replace Mitchell in the 11th District, gathered in Upton to mark a rebirth of the decrepit garden near the 1200 block of Shields Place.
NEWS
By JONI GUHNE and JONI GUHNE,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 16, 2006
Lisa Musser-Jacobs, whose dad grew up on a farm in Gaithersburg, never wanted her daughters to think produce just magically appeared in the supermarket. After spending a hot Saturday morning tending the South County Community Garden, they don't. With as many as 100 varieties of vegetables, flowers and herbs - including 400 tomato plants and a third of a mile of potatoes - the garden has sprouted lessons about work, charity and family. Musser-Jacobs, who along with her husband, Don, and their two children, Kara, 12, and Leigh, 9, are among the 42 members of the 3 1/2 -acre garden next to Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary in Lothian.
NEWS
By Lane Page | April 29, 2014
It's been a couple of growing seasons since the Enchanted Garden at Howard County's Miller Branch Library has taken root, its trees and bushes branching, perennials spreading, annuals blossoming and edibles bursting with nutrients and flavor. Developed next to the children's area of the library, its total space may consist of a mere quarter-acre, but Oasis Design Group, Live Green Landscape Associates LLC and many volunteers have managed to tuck in some 65 varieties of woody and perennial plants plus varying annuals, benches for relaxation and contemplation, a pond, a stream and even a couple of sculptures.
NEWS
September 10, 2013
September is Hunger Action Month. Together, we can take action to fight hunger in our community. Since 2008, the number of individuals who visit the Howard County Food Bank has increased from 3,800 to over 22,000. These are your neighbors. About 50 percent of individuals who visit the food bank are senior citizens on fixed incomes. Eighty percent are female and 40 percent earn less than $20,000 per year. Some of the families are receiving SNAP funds, formerly known as food stamps.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2013
Thousands of dollars and hours of labor have been poured into Boone Street Farm, an oasis on a quarter-acre of city-owned land a few blocks north of Green Mount Cemetery. Through Baltimore's "Adopt-A-Lot" program, residents legally planted fruit trees, established a free community garden and erected a greenhouse there. During the summer, the farm employs a handful of young people. "We have a significant amount of space under production now," said Cheryl Carmona, one of the founders of the farm, which sprouted where 12 rowhouses once stood.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | July 3, 2013
Baltimore City has awarded "an exclusive negotiating privilege" to an urban farming collective to buy two vacant, city-owned lots near a community garden in Hampden. The collective, Baltimore Free Farm, is trying to buy the lots to prevent their development. The group was one of two bidders for the lots last month; the other is a developer, who has expressed interest in building housing on both lots, according to Baltimore Housing, which is selling the lots through its Vacants to Value program to encourage re-investment in properties in the city that suffer from neglect, abandonment and blight.
NEWS
By Melanie Dzwonchyk | May 20, 2013
Visit the new City of Laurel Community Garden and meet one-on-one with Laurel City Council members at a garden open house Saturday, June 1 from 9 a.m. to noon. The CLCG garden is located behind Laurel Presbyterian Church, 7610 Old Sandy Spring Road. Representatives from the University of Maryland's Master Garden Program will attend, and there are activities planned for children. During the garden open house, City Council members will hold Bagels with the Council as an informal way to meet with constituents outside of regular City Council meetings.
EXPLORE
Special to The Aegs | March 18, 2013
T'Jae Gibson, of Abingdon, won first place in the Community Relations-Special Events category at the major command level in a U.S. Army public affairs competition. She leads the Army Research Laboratory's broadcast services area. She also serves as the public affairs office's designate for public affairs planning and project integration. A panel of eight civilian sector and government public affairs practitioners from around the country judged the competition. As a result of winning at the Army Materiel Command level, the program will compete at the Pentagon to be named a 2012 Maj. Gen. Keith L. Ware Public Affairs award winner, a pinnacle achievement for Army public affairs practitioners.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | April 18, 2012
Sometimes rain is perfect for a public event - when it involves growing things. The skies dripped helpfully today as MayorStephanie Rawlings-Blakeand a gaggle of dignitaries turned out to celebrate the launch of a new community garden in West Baltimore's Upton neighborhood. With the help of volunteers from nonprofits and financial support from the  Scott's Miracle-Gro Co.. 32 vacant lots in the 500 block of Laurens Street have been cleared and prepared for raising vegetables and fruit.  The "edible garden," as it's being called, is part of the mayor's " Power in Dirt " initiative seeking to convert vacant lots into productive, community-managed open spaces.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 23, 1998
ETHETE, Wyo. -- In the face of cutbacks brought about by the overhaul of welfare programs, members of the Northern Arapaho Tribe have started a 7-acre community garden with donated land, seeds and equipment to grow vegetables for themselves and for the elderly and disabled."
EXPLORE
By Bob Allen | August 14, 2012
With its rolling lawns and stately trees, the grounds of Babcock Presbyterian Church, just off busy Loch Raven Boulevard, is like an urban oasis. On a sweltering early August morning, a cool breeze sweeps across a grassy knoll behind the church building. The open space along Loch Ness Road is contoured with a dozen small, rectangular garden plots where squash, cucumbers, tomatoes and cantaloupes ripen on the vine and an occasional rabbit darts across the lawn and into the trees. The little plots, most about the size of a large dining room table, are part of the community garden project that Babcock Church started last year.
EXPLORE
August 13, 2012
A committee has been formed headed by a Master Gardener to organize the development of a community garden in Laurel. A community garden; what a wonderful addition to an area that already offer many opportunities for citizens to meet, greet and enjoin in recreation, entertainment, socialization, business endeavors and other good causes. Now a community garden: Wow! That's an opportunity to grow food for ourselves and to share it. A location and a "go ahead" from city officials is still working itself out. The technical expertise of planting and cultivating is already in our backyard.
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