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By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | October 27, 2010
Baltimore organizations are getting nearly $19 million to help develop three areas of the city and ensure that new construction will mean better jobs for low-income residents. The city is one of five that won funding from Living Cities, a collaborative of large foundations and financial institutions trying to improve urban revitalization work. The money, a combination of loans and grants, will be announced Thursday. "We're grateful for this infusion of capital," said Betsy Nelson, president of the Association of Baltimore Area Grantmakers and chairwoman of the partnership receiving the award.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
Ernest L. Caldwell Jr., a retired senior city planner and urban designer who did early studies for what became Oriole Park at Camden Yards , died of complications of Parkinson's disease July 8 at Keswick Multi-Care Center. The Stoneleigh resident was 74. Colleagues said Mr. Caldwell, a longtime baseball fan, had an early and influential role in convincing city officials of the potential of the former Baltimore & Ohio Railroad property adjacent to Camden Station as the site of a new sports field.
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NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | October 11, 1999
The Harford Road Partnership, known as HARP, has appointed a new executive director, Brent Flickinger, who started the full-time post last week.Flickinger, 47, previously worked as a Baltimore County community planner, concentrating on the Northeast section. He also has worked as director of research and planning for the Archdiocese of Baltimore and as a community organizer in the Park Heights section of Northwest Baltimore.He succeeds Marian Gillis as HARP's executive director, responsible for overseeing community and economic development in the stretch of Harford Road that begins at Argonne Drive and continues north for a mile and a half through Lauraville and Beverly Hills in Northeast Baltimore.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2014
Two of the three Democratic candidates for governor told community development advocates Monday that they would reopen the debate over the just-passed boost in Maryland's minimum wage to accelerate the increase. Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler and Del. Heather R. Mizeur each expressed dissatisfaction with the minimum wage bill passed this year by the General Assembly. The bill raising the wage to $10.10 was a top priority of Gov. Martin O'Malley, but legislators slowed its implementation.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2014
Two of the three Democratic candidates for governor told community development advocates Monday that they would reopen the debate over the just-passed boost in Maryland's minimum wage to accelerate the increase. Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler and Del. Heather R. Mizeur each expressed dissatisfaction with the minimum wage bill passed this year by the General Assembly. The bill raising the wage to $10.10 was a top priority of Gov. Martin O'Malley, but legislators slowed its implementation.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Staff Writer | May 24, 1993
How Mary Williams, 29, a single mother of three with no credit rating, found a home of her own is a key part of the Clinton administration's proposed solution to the nation's urban crisis.With an income of $19,600 as an office cleaner, she was able to buy her $38,000 three-bedroom row house in Southwest Baltimore through a lending institution willing to take a credit risk no commercial bank would ordinarily consider.Through the same system, Wilbert and Betty McManus, in their 50s, bought their own first home -- a $42,000 three-bedroom shingled cottage with a pleasant yard -- last year after a lifetime of renting low-income housing.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | September 18, 2002
Charles C. Graves III, Baltimore's planning director, is leaving his $117,000 post after nine years to become Atlanta's commissioner of planning and neighborhood development, he announced yesterday. Graves told his 50-member staff the news Monday. Yesterday he expressed mixed emotions about moving from a city of 651,154 defined by its scores of neighborhoods. "Baltimore's a great city, but this is a unique opportunity because I'll be overseeing planning, community development and economic development," Graves said.
NEWS
January 20, 2002
WHEN ARNOLD Williams last week became the first African-American to chair the Baltimore Development Corp., his well-wishers at City Hall included some unusual investors - four leading pastors. They were there as the vanguard of divine capitalism, an emerging phenomenon that holds great promise for the city but may also lead to complicated political and tax problems. One of Mr. Williams' great challenges will be to balance the two - to harness the religious community's tremendous resources for the overall betterment of the city, but avoid the pitfalls that often come from mixing God with Mammon.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff fTC and Ernest F. Imhoff fTC,SUN STAFF | June 24, 1998
It's not only nonprofit agencies that are merging these days, but local philanthropies wanting more bang for their buck.About a third of the 70 groups in the Association of Baltimore Area Grantmakers (ABAG) are collaborating by pooling funds to promote community development in Baltimore and public service by youth statewide.The two types of initiatives, just ending their first year, are easily the most extensive collaborations ever done by grant-makers in Maryland, said Betsy S. Nelson, executive director of ABAG.
NEWS
December 8, 2012
When Baltimore officials have talked about the city's "anchor institutions" - universities, hospitals, churches and other nonprofits - it has occasionally been unclear what sense of the word "anchor" they have sought to convey. When talk turns to what these tax-exempt entities contribute to keeping the city alive, the word has sometimes carried less an aura of stability and more a sense of great weight dragging things down. With today's announcement that it will invest $10 million over five years in its effort to organize the neighborhoods around the Homewood Campus around common development goals, the Johns Hopkins University is going a long way toward changing that.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2013
Baltimore County officials say three local communities will be eligible for state funding for projects to improve their economies, housing, transportation and the environment based on their designation by the state as sustainable communities. Hillendale/Parkville/Overlea, Catonsville/Patapsco and Greater Dundalk were named "sustainable communities" by the state Department of Housing and Community Development and the state Department of Planning. The county picked the areas for consideration because of the potential for revitalization, and the county planning department worked with the communities to draw up strategies to encourage local investment.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | June 8, 2013
When the state Department of Housing and Community Development's 380 employees pack up and move from Crownsville to New Carrollton in 2015, fewer women will work out on their lunch break at Curves. It also may mean fewer people getting their cars repaired, having their dry cleaning done or picking up lunch at local businesses along Generals Highway. "It's going to hurt our local economy," said Jodi Kubisiak, manager of Curves, less than a mile from the housing department's office.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2013
A proposed zoning rule that would reduce the number of liquor outlets in Baltimore is garnering increased support among community members who believe it will make neighborhoods healthier and safer. The zoning change, part of the city's first zoning overhaul in 40 years, would force some retailers in residential areas to either alter what they sell or close their doors. That has prompted vocal opposition to the rule from the business owners, who say it's not fair and possibly illegal.
NEWS
December 8, 2012
When Baltimore officials have talked about the city's "anchor institutions" - universities, hospitals, churches and other nonprofits - it has occasionally been unclear what sense of the word "anchor" they have sought to convey. When talk turns to what these tax-exempt entities contribute to keeping the city alive, the word has sometimes carried less an aura of stability and more a sense of great weight dragging things down. With today's announcement that it will invest $10 million over five years in its effort to organize the neighborhoods around the Homewood Campus around common development goals, the Johns Hopkins University is going a long way toward changing that.
EXPLORE
December 2, 2012
The City of Westminster's Facade Improvement Program this week received a state grant of $50,000 as part of Maryland's Community Legacy program awards. The award was part of an overall package of $5.5 million awarded to projects across the state, and was announced by Lt. Governor Anthony G. Brown on Nov. 27 at an event in Baltimore. The Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development manages the program. The goal of the Community Legacy initiative is to provide local governments and community development organizations with funding for projects aimed at retaining and attracting businesses and encouraging homeownership and commercial revitalization.
EXPLORE
RECORD STAFF REPORT | November 28, 2012
The City of Havre de Grace has been announced as a 2012 Maryland Community Legacy Program grant recipient. Havre de Grace was awarded the full requested amount of Community Legacy grant funding for two programs benefiting its downtown revitalization effort, Meghan Simmons, Havre de Grace's economic development manager, said. The Façade Improvement Program will receive $25,000 and the Interior Fit-Out Program for Main Street building owners and tenants will receive $35,000, according to the Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development, which administers the program.
NEWS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | August 4, 2003
Baltimore lags seriously behind comparable cities in its neighborhood development efforts because of an array of organizational problems, a new study says - a conclusion undisputed by a cross section of civic leaders. Baltimore lacks clearly defined development goals, and it needs more financial and leadership assistance from its leading companies, more focused support from business groups and better leadership of public development groups, the report says. City officials say they know the development effort is falling short.
NEWS
December 22, 1999
Two Washington, D.C. philanthropies, the Ford Foundation and the National Congress for Community Economic Development, have donated $73,500 to the Maryland Center for Community Development in downtown Baltimore.The award will be used to support public policy programs, including educating community development corporations about welfare's impact on Maryland communities, and evaluating changes in federal work force funding.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2012
At the recent Governor's Housing Conference in Baltimore, the blue logo of a house with rays of light emanating from behind the roof was ubiquitous. It's the emblem of one of the conference's main sponsors, Enterprise, and to the roughly 800 people in attendance Oct. 16, it was nearly as recognizable as the red-and-yellow square of Wells Fargo, another sponsor. "They're not just a distant organization. … They bring home their national knowledge to us, and we impart what we're seeing," said Trudy McFall, president of the Maryland Affordable Housing Coalition, who moderated a panel about rental housing financing at the conference.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2012
The City Arts Apartments are full of artists who live and work in the Baltimore complex, built on what long had been a vacant lot in a very vacant neighborhood. But a sudden gap in its development financing almost kept the project from getting off the ground. The $2.5 million hole was dug by the financial crisis, which pummeled the value of tax credits that many affordable-housing projects rely on. The post-crisis landscape for community development is shaping up to be even more challenging.
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