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NEWS
By Donald P. Hutchinson and Laurie B. Schwartz | September 18, 1996
ZERO TOLERANCE of so-called nuisance crimes has the potential to make Baltimore streets safer and its residents less fearful. Baltimore City Police Commissioner Thomas Frazier is to be commended for his new enforcement strategy to issue citations to offenders who commit what some might call ''petty crimes.'' The true impact of these crimes is far from petty.Left unattended, relatively minor irritations contribute to the perception that a neighborhood is an unsafe breeding ground for crime.
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NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | September 15, 2010
In the campaign for Baltimore state's attorney, we had the incumbent, Patricia Jessamy, touting her expansive concepts of the chief prosecutor's role and speaking frequently about a "three-pronged approach" to crime — prevention, treatment and law enforcement. Her opponent, Gregg Bernstein, pushed a narrower agenda: "Fight crime first. " Looks like Gregg Bernstein might have won the election. Looks like "fight violent crime first and do all the other touchy-feely stuff later" might have lost.
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NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | December 3, 2006
The incoming mayor of Baltimore should revive a common-sense idea that the outgoing mayor of Baltimore scrapped. If city officials really want to end chronic homelessness in Baltimore, then Sheila Dixon should reopen discussions about Community Court. This is a great idea that was set for takeoff as the new millennium approached. It never got a chance to work. It would not have been a panacea - what is? - but it certainly would have made a dent in the homelessness and other human miseries that continue to diminish the quality of life here.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | December 3, 2006
The incoming mayor of Baltimore should revive a common-sense idea that the outgoing mayor of Baltimore scrapped. If city officials really want to end chronic homelessness in Baltimore, then Sheila Dixon should reopen discussions about Community Court. This is a great idea that was set for takeoff as the new millennium approached. It never got a chance to work. It would not have been a panacea - what is? - but it certainly would have made a dent in the homelessness and other human miseries that continue to diminish the quality of life here.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | September 17, 1997
Plans for a New York-style "community court" in Baltimore received a boost with a $275,000 private grant that will be used to purchase a downtown building for the project, coordinators announced yesterday.The Greater Baltimore Community (GBC), an organization of more than 600 businesses and civic leaders that is leading the effort to establish the court, is scheduled to settle on the four-story National Marine Building at 33 S. Gay St. on Oct. 15.The Abell Foundation gave the grant for the building, now owned by NationsBank, and the GBC will raise the funds for its renovation.
NEWS
By IVAN PENN and IVAN PENN,SUN STAFF | June 26, 1997
Hoping to break the cycle of petty crime and futile punishment, the state took major steps yesterday toward creating a New York-style "community court" in Baltimore to reform criminals through treatment programs and community service.The state approved a $60,000 grant to hire a coordinator for the project and established an oversight committee of city and state officials as well as representatives of Baltimore's business community. Although significant hurdles remain, proponents of the court are hoping the first such operation in Maryland will be up and running as early as September 1998.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | January 16, 1998
A Baltimore City court designed to sentence defendants charged with misdemeanors quickly has won the support of Gov. Parris N. Glendening, who requested $1.9 million in state money to pay for it.The Community Court of Baltimore, which would be at the site of the old, four-story National Marine Building at 33 S. Gay St., is expected to open at the end of the year.The concept is modeled after the Midtown Community Court in New York City, which reduced nuisance crimes and is credited with being one of the initiatives that cleaned up Times Square.
NEWS
January 11, 1998
THE CHIEF OF Maryland's district courts has reiterated her opposition to placing a district judge inside the Central Booking and Intake Center in Baltimore.The decision by Chief Judge Martha F. Rasin increases the need for a misdemeanors community court, one of the best ideas brought back from New York in 1996 by a City Council delegation pushing hard for "zero tolerance" police tactics.Misdemeanor cases clog the system at Central Booking. A circuit judge sets up shop at the facility once a week to handle felonies, but that is only 20 percent of the caseload.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | January 13, 1998
In a meeting yesterday with the Greater Baltimore Committee, state legislative leaders endorsed a proposal for a "community court" in the city that would handle misdemeanor crimes and sentence offenders to treatment programs and community service.Maryland Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller and House of Delegates Speaker Casper R. Taylor Jr. told the GBC, which is leading the effort to establish the court, that they will support legislation to create one.Modeled after a court in New York City, a community court handles cases in which defendants, who are charged with such misdemeanor crimes as prostitution, minor drug offenses and loitering, plead guilty immediately and are sentenced to community service, such as sweeping streets or cleaning up graffiti.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | January 11, 2001
Plans for a downtown "community court" to handle minor offenses have been all but scrapped, three years after Baltimore business leaders bought a building, got a judge and rounded up more than $4 million in public and private funds to run it. Now, the Greater Baltimore Committee, which initially proposed the court, is trying to see if some of the proposed court's unique aspects - such as on-site drug abuse and employment counseling - can be transferred to...
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | August 27, 2001
A PERSONAL moratorium on catching and eating blue crabs from the Chesapeake is two summers along now, and while it has been tough for me to abstain - OK, I tasted my sister's crab fluff at Glenmore Gardens last month - my spirits have been buoyed by the number of Marylanders who've written or called to say they're with me in spirit and in practice. Many believe Maryland and Virginia should try to save the fully exploited crab fishery by going beyond current conservation measures to impose a one-year moratorium on the commercial harvest.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | January 11, 2001
Plans for a downtown "community court" to handle minor offenses have been all but scrapped, three years after Baltimore business leaders bought a building, got a judge and rounded up more than $4 million in public and private funds to run it. Now, the Greater Baltimore Committee, which initially proposed the court, is trying to see if some of the proposed court's unique aspects - such as on-site drug abuse and employment counseling - can be transferred to...
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | December 23, 1999
Baltimore will receive more than $5 million in federal public safety money that will help provide 150 cameras in police patrol cars, establish the long-awaited downtown community court and beef up security in city schools.The Board of Estimates held a public hearing yesterday on the federal block grant the Bureau of Justice Assistance plans to award the city. The federal government requires that jurisdictions receiving the grants hold a public hearing before spending the money.The board must approve the use of the money, which members are expected to consider after the new year.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 20, 1999
Maryland's first "community court," designed to siphon off small-crime cases from Baltimore's backlogged Circuit Court, got a $224,000 boost to its first-year budget yesterday.The federal grant from the Justice Department, announced by Maryland's Democratic Senators Paul S. Sarbanes and Barbara A. Mikulski, will be used to help identify which offenders -- in minor crimes such as panhandling and vandalism -- might need further help from social service agencies.Under the current system, such offenders generally receive little punishment and even less attention, except for their time in court.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Caitlin Francke and Michael Dresser and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | March 2, 1999
Maryland's top judges received stern warnings from the General Assembly yesterday that lawmakers will use their budget-cutting power to force reforms in Baltimore's crippled Circuit Court.The threats from powerful legislators came as legislative analysts delivered a stinging report in which they recommended more than $10 million in cuts from the judiciary's proposed operating budget.Del. Peter Franchot, chairman of the House Appropriations subcommittee on the courts, said the "unprecedented" cuts suggested by analysts reflect the frustration of the General Assembly with the problems in Baltimore's courts.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 25, 1998
DIEPSLOOT, South Africa -- Fanie Soni sits in judgment of his neighbors in this squatter camp of 26,000 impoverished shack-dwellers north of Johannesburg.He has no legal qualifications, no training and is unemployed. But he is the first rung on the ladder of justice here.He sits in the community court, an informal forum approved by the community, tolerated by the police and about to be legalized by the government of President Nelson Mandela.The Justice Department wants community courts like this one to be officially recognized as an affordable, accessible and acceptable way of dealing with minor crimes and social problems.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | December 23, 1999
Baltimore will receive more than $5 million in federal public safety money that will help provide 150 cameras in police patrol cars, establish the long-awaited downtown community court and beef up security in city schools.The Board of Estimates held a public hearing yesterday on the federal block grant the Bureau of Justice Assistance plans to award the city. The federal government requires that jurisdictions receiving the grants hold a public hearing before spending the money.The board must approve the use of the money, which members are expected to consider after the new year.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | August 27, 2001
A PERSONAL moratorium on catching and eating blue crabs from the Chesapeake is two summers along now, and while it has been tough for me to abstain - OK, I tasted my sister's crab fluff at Glenmore Gardens last month - my spirits have been buoyed by the number of Marylanders who've written or called to say they're with me in spirit and in practice. Many believe Maryland and Virginia should try to save the fully exploited crab fishery by going beyond current conservation measures to impose a one-year moratorium on the commercial harvest.
NEWS
January 19, 1998
ALTHOUGH THE Larry Young debate has blotted out most light filtering from the Maryland General Assembly as it begins in its 90-day session in Annapolis, behind the scenes bills and budgets are starting to form. Some ideas are intriguing, some deserve a quick death, others will plant a seed to become law a year or more from now.The following is a summary of agendas for legislative delegations in the Baltimore area -- the good, the bad and the unlikely:City that sleeps?THANKS TO Mr. Young's expulsion from the Senate last week, Baltimore City's delegation is trying to avoid anything controversial that might cast it in a bad light.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | January 16, 1998
A Baltimore City court designed to sentence defendants charged with misdemeanors quickly has won the support of Gov. Parris N. Glendening, who requested $1.9 million in state money to pay for it.The Community Court of Baltimore, which would be at the site of the old, four-story National Marine Building at 33 S. Gay St., is expected to open at the end of the year.The concept is modeled after the Midtown Community Court in New York City, which reduced nuisance crimes and is credited with being one of the initiatives that cleaned up Times Square.
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