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By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | September 30, 1998
ABOUT 4 P.M. TOMORROW, the Community Colleges of Baltimore County will symbolically drop their "s" and become the Community College of Baltimore County, a single college with three campuses -- Catonsville, Dundalk and Essex.The ceremonial signing of legislation creating the single entity is part of a three-day celebration culminating Saturday in the inauguration of Irving Pressley McPhail as chancellor.McPhail, a 49-year-old former reading specialist, is a big man with a big voice and an equally big challenge.
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2014
A prospective student at the Community College of Baltimore County sued school officials in federal court this week, contending that he was denied admission to an academic program based on an expression of his religious beliefs. Brandon Jenkins, who is being represented by the Washington-based American Center for Law and Justice, said in the lawsuit that when asked what was most important to him during an interview with CCBC officials as part of the application process last spring, he responded: "My God. " Shortly afterward, he was denied admission into the radiation therapy program, and he asked the program coordinator for an explanation in an email.
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2014
A prospective student at the Community College of Baltimore County sued school officials in federal court this week, contending that he was denied admission to an academic program based on an expression of his religious beliefs. Brandon Jenkins, who is being represented by the Washington-based American Center for Law and Justice, said in the lawsuit that when asked what was most important to him during an interview with CCBC officials as part of the application process last spring, he responded: "My God. " Shortly afterward, he was denied admission into the radiation therapy program, and he asked the program coordinator for an explanation in an email.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2011
Rhoda P. Levin, a national leader in community health care education and a community activist, died July 5 of leukemia at her Pikesville home. She was 82. Rhoda Powell was born in New York City. In 1942, she moved to Baltimore when her parents opened a grocery store at Division and Wilson streets, where they lived above the store. While attending Forest Park High School, from which she graduated in 1947, she met and married a classmate, Norman Levin. Married at 18, Mrs. Levin worked as a comptometer operator while her husband earned his degree from the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | July 11, 2011
Rhoda P. Levin, a national leader in community health care education and a community activist, died July 5 of leukemia at her Pikesville home. She was 82. Rhoda Powell was born in New York City. In 1942, she moved to Baltimore when her parents opened a grocery store at Division and Wilson streets, where they lived above the store. While attending Forest Park High School, from which she graduated in 1947, she met and married a classmate, Norman Levin. Married at 18, Mrs. Levin worked as a comptometer operator while her husband earned his degree from the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones Bonbrest and Nancy Jones Bonbrest,Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2009
Salary: $60,000 Age: 52 Years on the job: 1.5 years How she got started: Jean Wible graduated with a degree in nursing from Marywood University in Pennsylvania. She worked as a nurse for more than 20 years, specializing in geriatric nursing and hospice care. In 1997 she became certified in massage therapy and built a private practice as a massage therapist while working part time as a nurse. The combination worked well, Wible said. "I was looking to balance things out. I wanted to move toward health and wellness instead of death and illness.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | April 9, 2003
THERE'S a little something for everyone in the long-awaited evaluation of the Community College of Baltimore County by consultant James L. Fisher. For college Chancellor Irving Pressley McPhail, the $22,000 Fisher report is a bouquet. Five years ago, when the school's board of trustees hired McPhail from the St. Louis area, Fisher and colleagues conducted a much more elaborate study, finding CCBC in a state of near chaos. No longer. "In virtually every area that counts," the new report says, "CCBC is better now than it was in 1997."
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | December 29, 2002
In an era when higher education leaders switch colleges as often as utility infielders switch baseball teams, the five-year anniversary of a campus executive is not to be taken lightly. And if that's not enough reason for Irving P. McPhail to celebrate his nickel anniversary as chancellor of the Community College of Baltimore County, he also has this: a salary bonus worth an estimated $135,000. When CCBC's board of trustees hired McPhail, 53, away from a community college in St. Louis in 1997, it was so desperate to bring order to the sprawling system that it offered him a year's salary as incentive if he lasted five years on the job. The trustees also hoped the bonus would help keep a chancellor who had four jobs in 10 years before coming to CCBC.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | April 23, 1997
BCCC and CCBC. That's the lamentable alphabetical hodgepodge by which Baltimore City and Baltimore County community colleges, respectively, are divided. If it confuses you, rest assured that it also confuses headline writers and Bell Atlantic information operators.Never mind the thinking, or lack of it, that went into the naming of the two entities.It is enough to know that the two-campus Baltimore City Community College (BCCC) is celebrating its golden anniversary, while the three-campus Community Colleges of Baltimore County (CCBC)
FEATURES
January 18, 2007
Circus See Cirque Voila! See an acrobatic show featuring juggling, comedy, high-wire artists and more in Cirque Voila! at Community College of Baltimore County. Tickets are $25. The 7 p.m. show is in the B Building Theatre at CCBC, Essex, 7201 Rossville Blvd. Call 410-780-6369 for information.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones Bonbrest and Nancy Jones Bonbrest,Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2009
Salary: $60,000 Age: 52 Years on the job: 1.5 years How she got started: Jean Wible graduated with a degree in nursing from Marywood University in Pennsylvania. She worked as a nurse for more than 20 years, specializing in geriatric nursing and hospice care. In 1997 she became certified in massage therapy and built a private practice as a massage therapist while working part time as a nurse. The combination worked well, Wible said. "I was looking to balance things out. I wanted to move toward health and wellness instead of death and illness.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | April 9, 2003
THERE'S a little something for everyone in the long-awaited evaluation of the Community College of Baltimore County by consultant James L. Fisher. For college Chancellor Irving Pressley McPhail, the $22,000 Fisher report is a bouquet. Five years ago, when the school's board of trustees hired McPhail from the St. Louis area, Fisher and colleagues conducted a much more elaborate study, finding CCBC in a state of near chaos. No longer. "In virtually every area that counts," the new report says, "CCBC is better now than it was in 1997."
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | December 29, 2002
In an era when higher education leaders switch colleges as often as utility infielders switch baseball teams, the five-year anniversary of a campus executive is not to be taken lightly. And if that's not enough reason for Irving P. McPhail to celebrate his nickel anniversary as chancellor of the Community College of Baltimore County, he also has this: a salary bonus worth an estimated $135,000. When CCBC's board of trustees hired McPhail, 53, away from a community college in St. Louis in 1997, it was so desperate to bring order to the sprawling system that it offered him a year's salary as incentive if he lasted five years on the job. The trustees also hoped the bonus would help keep a chancellor who had four jobs in 10 years before coming to CCBC.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | September 30, 1998
ABOUT 4 P.M. TOMORROW, the Community Colleges of Baltimore County will symbolically drop their "s" and become the Community College of Baltimore County, a single college with three campuses -- Catonsville, Dundalk and Essex.The ceremonial signing of legislation creating the single entity is part of a three-day celebration culminating Saturday in the inauguration of Irving Pressley McPhail as chancellor.McPhail, a 49-year-old former reading specialist, is a big man with a big voice and an equally big challenge.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | April 23, 1997
BCCC and CCBC. That's the lamentable alphabetical hodgepodge by which Baltimore City and Baltimore County community colleges, respectively, are divided. If it confuses you, rest assured that it also confuses headline writers and Bell Atlantic information operators.Never mind the thinking, or lack of it, that went into the naming of the two entities.It is enough to know that the two-campus Baltimore City Community College (BCCC) is celebrating its golden anniversary, while the three-campus Community Colleges of Baltimore County (CCBC)
NEWS
June 27, 2012
I was very pleased to read the article about the Community College of Baltimore County's decision to ban tobacco use on its campuses ("CCBC to ban tobacco products on its campuses," June 25). Wouldn't it be nice if smoking was banned all over Maryland! Nick Delambo, Baltimore
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