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By Kim Fernandez, For The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2014
Residents of the Fells Prospect neighborhood have long grumbled about abandoned dog feces in their sidewalk tree pits. But when a recent community association newsletter advised members to, among other things, place pine cones or clippings from thorny plants in the pits to keep dogs out, some property owners saw red and said the suggestions were both harmful to pets and illegal. John Lam, a dog owner who's lived in the neighborhood -- which is near Fells Point and Butchers Hill -- for three years, said the association's January newsletter “made a point that a tremendous amount of people aren't picking up after their pets.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
An Anne Arundel County woman once honored for her activism pleaded guilty Thursday to misusing nearly $74,000 of her community association's money. Wanda Brooks Hebron pleaded guilty to one count of theft scheme of more than $500 in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court. Assistant State's Attorney Michael Cogan said that from 2002 through 2009, Hebron used a debit card belonging to the Stillmeadows Condominium Association in Severn to make $73,943.12 worth of purchases at restaurants, gas stations and drug stores, and to pay cellphone bills.
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NEWS
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
At 90 years old, Betty Williams' clearest memory of her days at Colored School 115 is running through an alley the schoolchildren thought was haunted. "It was a game to run through and not get caught," she said, describing the lane between two of the old school's buildings. Williams attended grades one through six at the school, built in 1888 in Baltimore's Waverly neighborhood, from 1929 to 1935. It was declared unfit for children in the 1920s but continued in use because of "the feeling that black children weren't deserving of anything better," said historian JoAnn Robinson.
NEWS
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
At 90 years old, Betty Williams' clearest memory of her days at Colored School 115 is running through an alley the schoolchildren thought was haunted. "It was a game to run through and not get caught," she said, describing the lane between two of the old school's buildings. Williams attended grades one through six at the school, built in 1888 in Baltimore's Waverly neighborhood, from 1929 to 1935. It was declared unfit for children in the 1920s but continued in use because of "the feeling that black children weren't deserving of anything better," said historian JoAnn Robinson.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | September 29, 1997
For more than 30 years, Elkridge Community Association has lobbied on behalf of more than 400 homeowners on such issues as a controversial solid-waste trash transfer station and a single ZIP code for the area.That could all change -- not the purpose, but the name.Members are considering changing the group's name because the area the association represents has grown to include parts of Dorsey, Ellicott City, Hanover and Jessup.Members weighed in with their votes for a new name during the group's meeting Thursday night, according to Daniel Vaccaro, an association board member who distributed a survey.
NEWS
February 19, 1996
Wilde Lake Community Association is sponsoring a second session of Internet workshops at Bryant Woods Neighborhood Center, 10449 Green Mount Circle."Creating an Internet Homepage" will be offered from 2 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Saturday and March 2 and 9.The cost is $15 per class or $40 for the series.Registration is required.Information: 730-3987.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | February 16, 1994
For the past four weeks -- unlike the previous four years -- Muriel Carter has not made a daily trek to the Glen Burnie Improvement Association building to conduct business."
NEWS
By Lourdes Sullivan and Lourdes Sullivan,SUN STAFF | January 28, 2000
BILL WAFF, a member of the Howard County Board of Appeals, is retiring as president of the Savage Community Association. He has held that post, he says, more often than not for the past 10 years. But after his appointment in June to the Board of Appeals, "You try to avoid conflict of interest," he said. The Board of Appeals makes decisions regarding land use. The Waffs moved to Savage from Mississippi, where Bill was in the Coast Guard, in 1976. They had lived in Columbia and Bowie, and knew and liked the area.
NEWS
By JEAN LESLIE | October 4, 1993
This summer, St. John's Lane Community Association sponsored its first gardening contest, complete with judges, prizes, and various categories.Doris Guercio, Ruth Hutchinson and Ellen Oppenheimer toured the sprawling area in June, coming up with three winners and three honorable mentions.Winner of the best sunny garden was Beverly Lang of 3600 block Meadowvale Drive; best shady garden, Bob and Joan Coberly of 4200 block Club Court; and best all-around yard, Marie and Jennings Brinsfield of 3800 block Spring Meadow Drive.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | April 22, 2005
A Rodgers Forge couple came out on top yesterday in a legal battle hinging on what might seem a simple question: Where is the "front" of their house? The decision yesterday by the Baltimore County Board of Appeals marked the second time that Brigid and Dave Wilder have prevailed in a challenge to their plans to enlarge their kitchen and add a porch to their end-of-group rowhouse - a project that a community association has said would threaten the architectural and aesthetic integrity of the neighborhood.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez, For The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2014
Residents of the Fells Prospect neighborhood have long grumbled about abandoned dog feces in their sidewalk tree pits. But when a recent community association newsletter advised members to, among other things, place pine cones or clippings from thorny plants in the pits to keep dogs out, some property owners saw red and said the suggestions were both harmful to pets and illegal. John Lam, a dog owner who's lived in the neighborhood -- which is near Fells Point and Butchers Hill -- for three years, said the association's January newsletter “made a point that a tremendous amount of people aren't picking up after their pets.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2013
The meeting of East Baltimore's Berea community association is packed - standing room only - and leader Julius Henson is in control. There's a tavern to oppose. A computer lab to improve. Trash to clean up. Finally, Henson turns to the queue of political candidates from across the city who've been waiting for a chance to speak. He flashes a smile, but his tone is firm. "One minute," Henson tells them. "Quickly. " Watching Henson lead one of Baltimore's most powerful community associations, an observer might forget this is the same man who was convicted last year in a high-profile election-fraud case.
NEWS
By Loni Ingraham | July 1, 2013
Leslie Vallade is a woman on a mission. As president of the new nonprofit Loch Raven Fireworks Foundation Inc., she said only a third of the $10,000 needed to stage the annual July 4 fireworks display at Loch Raven Technical Academy has been raised. But Vallade is undaunted in her efforts and confident that spectators from the dozens of nearby neighborhoods who attend the display will come through by donating the remaining $6,500 to cover its costs. It's "been very stressful.
NEWS
May 5, 2013
Regarding the recent debate over dirt bikes, as president of my community association I can assure you that while the riders' antics may seem "cool" to their peers, the rest of us see them as noisy and a danger to motorists ("Don't penalize city kids for riding dirt bikes," April 25). I personally have had two frightening near collisions with these lawbreakers in recent years. That is why I would welcome legislation making it mandatory for retailers who sell dirt bikes to prominently display signs informing potential buyers that it is illegal to drive dirt bikes inside the city limits.
NEWS
April 17, 2013
On April 2, a hearing was held at the Baltimore City Zoning Board to determine whether the zoning authority would grant conditional use for a gas station to a new, mega-Royal Farms store. This would operate 24/7 with at least 12 gas pumps at the intersection of Harford, Glenmore, Grindon and Old Harford Roads in Hamilton.  All Northeast community associations voted against this development with hundreds of outraged citizens turning out to voice their opposition at meetings over the course of many months.  This development is suitable for an interstate or busy highway, not a residential neighborhood of old homes which has been struggling, slowly but with some tenuous success, to revive itself as a viable community with small, locally owned businesses lining Harford Road, including an independent gas station and several great restaurants.  The intersection is a traffic nightmare, well-known to the city, which is now going to spend $400,000 of taxpayer money to create a new traffic pattern on behalf of the privately owned Royal Farms.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2013
After a heated meeting, members of the Baltimore City Democratic Central Committee have selected the director of the Oliver Community Association to replace Del. Hattie Harrison, who was the longest-serving member of the House of Delegates.  Committee members voted Friday to appoint Nina Harper to fill the open seat in the 45th District, which includes much of northeast and east Baltimore. She did not respond to a call seeking comment Monday. Scherod C. Barnes, of the central committee, said the full committee would likely approve Harper's nomination Wednesday, sending the pick to Gov. Martin O'Malley for final approval.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2013
The meeting of East Baltimore's Berea community association is packed - standing room only - and leader Julius Henson is in control. There's a tavern to oppose. A computer lab to improve. Trash to clean up. Finally, Henson turns to the queue of political candidates from across the city who've been waiting for a chance to speak. He flashes a smile, but his tone is firm. "One minute," Henson tells them. "Quickly. " Watching Henson lead one of Baltimore's most powerful community associations, an observer might forget this is the same man who was convicted last year in a high-profile election-fraud case.
BUSINESS
By Andree Brooks and Andree Brooks,New York Times News Service | October 10, 1993
When satellite dish antennas first came on the market some 13 years ago they were large and ugly, like giant rice bowls sprouting in a greensward. So it was understandable that condominium and other homeowner associations tightly restricted their use.But too often the unit owners didn't care. According to the Satellite Broadcasting and Communications Association, the trade association for satellite dish reception based in Alexandria, Va., about 364,000 residential satellite systems were installed in 1992, twice as many as the 130,000 systems installed in 1982.
FEATURES
By Karen Nitkin, For The Baltimore Sun | October 21, 2012
Not so long ago, a dilapidated house stood on the corner of Jenifer Avenue and 30th Street in Baltimore's Montebello community, a magnet for drug users and dealers. But now the house has been torn down, and a mural is planned that will fill the space "with color and joy," said Natalya Brusilovsky, the healthy neighborhoods coordinator for the Coldstream-Homestead-Montebello Community Corp., a nonprofit community association. The mural is the brainchild of Gabrielle Elkaim, a 29-year-old Mount Vernon resident who works for the federal government and is taking a seminar through a program called Landmark Education that requires her to "create a project that inspires," she said.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2012
The lawyer for a Catonsville community association tried unsuccessfully again Thursday to delay a Baltimore County hearing on a proposed medical office building, saying state prosecutors' requests for information on the project have raised questions about the county's development process. Attorney J. Carroll Holzer, representing the Kenwood Gardens Condominium Association, called the situation unprecedented as the administrative hearing opened. His clients oppose construction of the Southwest Physicians Pavilion planned by Whalen Properties.
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