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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | June 6, 2000
The city of Westminster officially approved last night the $310,000 purchase of the Carroll Theater, paving the way for a performing and community arts center downtown. In a brief meeting, the Westminster Common Council exercised its option to buy the 70-year-old Main Street building from the Church of the Open Door, which has owned the property about 10 years and held its Sunday bus ministry services there. With an estimated $500,000 in renovations, the former movie theater will become the center for the Carroll County Arts Council, which has about 1,000 members.
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NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2013
About a half-dozen people at a time pitched in Saturday to help Baltimore artist Wilson Kemp complete a mural during Artscape. They crouched near the bottom of the canvas, perched on a step stool or squeezed in somewhere in the middle, ignoring the heat as they gripped paint brushes and zeroed in on their own small corners of a bigger picture. At the 32nd annual Baltimore festival, it was community art in progress. The grassy park across from the Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall became home to the first ever "10,000 brushes" project, billed as a "mural experience" during the event that calls itself America's biggest free arts festival.
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NEWS
May 28, 2006
Community Arts Development Grants are available to support nonprofit organizations that offer arts and crafts activities in Carroll County between July 1, 2006, and June 30, 2007. Applicants must be based in Carroll County and conduct their programs and events in fully handicapped-accessible locations. Awards range from $500 to $3,500 based on the organization's size, artistic quality and amount available for distribution. Applications are available at the Carroll Arts Center, 91 W. Main St., Westminster.
NEWS
By John Harding | June 1, 2011
Curtain up! Artform has a new face and a new address, but it's the same good source for local cultural notes. Our staff of  arts writers — Mike Giuliano, Carolyn Kelemen and myself — are here to preview the worthy events you might want to keep in mind when planning your calendar.  
NEWS
January 20, 2003
The Baltimore Office of Promotion & The Arts is accepting applications for its CityArts 2003 Grant Program to promote visual, literary and performing arts in city communities. The program awards two types of grants: Community Arts Projects Grants, which help city artists and nonprofit cultural organizations promote arts discovery; and General Funding Grants, which defray costs for nonprofit cultural organizations. Grant applications are due by 4:30 p.m. Feb. 24. Applications: 410-752-8632 or download one from www.promotionandarts.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | December 26, 1993
Local artists and nonprofit cultural organizations are invited to apply to the 1994 CityArts Grants Program for funds to support arts programming in community settings.Operated by the Mayor's Advisory Committee on Art and Culture, grants are offered to community arts projects by individual artists and nonprofit cultural organizations and also to help these organizations with general operating funds. (There are no general funding grants to individual artists.)Those eligible include professional artists who are at least 18, live in Baltimore City and possess the ability to administer a community arts project.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | November 28, 2000
We've just had a presidential election in which both candidates tried to convince us that, if elected, they would do more for education than the other guy. Funny thing, though: neither of them said a word about arts education - the kinds of programs that introduce young people to the basics of painting and sculpture, music, dance and theater. Oh, I know Al and George are talking about "basics," too. But when they say basics, they mean "reading, writing and arithmetic." Sure, those things are important, but the politicians never seem to connect the dots and realize that arts training actually helps kids learn their three Rs. Every study shows that children who receive instruction in art and music are more focused, get better grades and score higher on standardized tests than children who don't.
NEWS
June 22, 2001
Summer arts camp available for teen-agers Carroll County Arts Council will present Creative Teens summer camp from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. July 9-13 and July 23-27 at Westminster High School. The program will be lead by Carolyn Seabolt, an art teacher at Westminster High. The camp is designed for teens ages 13 to 16. Participants will work on complex craft projects in wood, paper, clay, glass, metal and fiber. Advanced reservations are required. Information: 410-848-7272. Arts council presenting bus trip to New York City Carroll County Arts Council will take a bus trip to New York City to see "42nd Street" or to sightsee July 18. Travelers can see the Broadway play "42nd Street."
NEWS
By MARY GAIL HARE and MARY GAIL HARE,SUN REPORTER | July 16, 2006
Bel Air and Harford County will jointly finance a $2.5 million expansion of the auditorium in the planned new Bel Air High School, an addition that will provide a downtown venue for community arts events when the school opens in 2009. Although the town and the county school board have yet to accept the proposal, officials from both groups have said they are amenable to it. The Bel Air town commissioners will vote Tuesday to fund about $1.5 million of the project during the next three years, with the county paying the remainder.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | October 18, 2000
Two county legislators plan to sponsor a $364,000 bond bill to help transform Westminster's Carroll Theater into a multipurpose theater and showplace for the performing and visual arts. Del. Nancy R. Stocksdale and Sen. Larry E. Haines, both Republicans, have agreed to sponsor the matching-funds bond bill, which will be considered during the General Assembly's 2001 session. Carroll County Arts Council and Westminster are raising $514,000 for the project, and neither will have to pay the state back for the bond money.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jennifer Choi and Jennifer Choi,Sun reporter | April 17, 2008
Gregg Wilhelm wants literary arts to step out of the shadows of its more sociable cousins. He's the helmsman of CityLit Festival V, a daylong celebration of the written word, which takes over the Enoch Pratt Free Library's Central Library on Saturday. "Literary arts are just as important and creative and enlightening as going to the BMA or Center Stage," said Wilhelm. "But they have this weird dilemma of often being created and consumed in solitude." The festival, which includes panel discussions, workshops, readings and appearances by several local authors, aims to show the public that literary arts can function as a more community-based activity.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | September 19, 2007
The exhibition of African-American paintings and works on paper at the Zenith Gallery in Washington is one of those rarest of art-world events, a gallery show where most of the artworks on display are not for sale. The Freedom Place Collection includes works by Romare Bearden, Benny Andrews, Alma Thomas, Robert Freeman and Richard Yarde. It belongs to a local couple, Washington attorney Stuart Bloch and his wife, Julia Chang Bloch, who began collecting in the late 1970s, when the value of artworks by African-Americans was not widely appreciated.
NEWS
By MARY GAIL HARE and MARY GAIL HARE,SUN REPORTER | July 16, 2006
Bel Air and Harford County will jointly finance a $2.5 million expansion of the auditorium in the planned new Bel Air High School, an addition that will provide a downtown venue for community arts events when the school opens in 2009. Although the town and the county school board have yet to accept the proposal, officials from both groups have said they are amenable to it. The Bel Air town commissioners will vote Tuesday to fund about $1.5 million of the project during the next three years, with the county paying the remainder.
NEWS
May 28, 2006
Community Arts Development Grants are available to support nonprofit organizations that offer arts and crafts activities in Carroll County between July 1, 2006, and June 30, 2007. Applicants must be based in Carroll County and conduct their programs and events in fully handicapped-accessible locations. Awards range from $500 to $3,500 based on the organization's size, artistic quality and amount available for distribution. Applications are available at the Carroll Arts Center, 91 W. Main St., Westminster.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | February 24, 2004
In the first decades of the 20th century, Andre Kertesz, Jacque-Henri Lartigue and Henri Cartier-Bresson invented what is known as "street photography," the artful snapshooting of people captured as they go about their business in public places. Baltimore photographer Linda Day Clark is an heir to that tradition, and as her show on view at the University of Maryland, Eastern Shore through the end of this month demonstrates, she is a contemporary master of the genre. Many of the photographs in the show were taken on the streets on and around North Avenue, where the artist has lived and worked for the past 15 years.
NEWS
January 20, 2003
The Baltimore Office of Promotion & The Arts is accepting applications for its CityArts 2003 Grant Program to promote visual, literary and performing arts in city communities. The program awards two types of grants: Community Arts Projects Grants, which help city artists and nonprofit cultural organizations promote arts discovery; and General Funding Grants, which defray costs for nonprofit cultural organizations. Grant applications are due by 4:30 p.m. Feb. 24. Applications: 410-752-8632 or download one from www.promotionandarts.
NEWS
By Patrick Hickerson and Patrick Hickerson,Contributing Writer | November 19, 1993
The time was when Ronald Reagan was still in his first term as president, the Orioles and Redskins were tops in their respective sports and Howard County was closing under-used schools.One closing a decade ago enabled an informal, 2-year-old organization called Howard Arts United to move into the vacant Rockland Elementary School in Ellicott City and re-name it the Rockland Arts Center, which later became the Howard County Center for the Arts.Two years later, Howard Arts United became the Howard County Arts Council and in 1987 was granted the power to distribute money to county groups.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | October 27, 2000
On a January night in 1998, an enthusiastic audience packed the auditorium of the old Brooklyn Park High School for a night of ballet, music, drama and a glimpse of the future. The sound system was awful, the seats were uncomfortable, but the show was a hit and the future looked bright. That evening, a determined group working to transform the closed school into the Chesapeake Center for the Creative Arts knew it was on the right track. "We thought we'd get a couple hundred people," recalls the center's executive director Wayne Shipley, "and we ended up with 800, many of them in broken seats that were in such disrepair that when you sat on them, you were slanted forward and had to put the brakes on for the whole performance.
NEWS
June 22, 2001
Summer arts camp available for teen-agers Carroll County Arts Council will present Creative Teens summer camp from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. July 9-13 and July 23-27 at Westminster High School. The program will be lead by Carolyn Seabolt, an art teacher at Westminster High. The camp is designed for teens ages 13 to 16. Participants will work on complex craft projects in wood, paper, clay, glass, metal and fiber. Advanced reservations are required. Information: 410-848-7272. Arts council presenting bus trip to New York City Carroll County Arts Council will take a bus trip to New York City to see "42nd Street" or to sightsee July 18. Travelers can see the Broadway play "42nd Street."
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | November 28, 2000
We've just had a presidential election in which both candidates tried to convince us that, if elected, they would do more for education than the other guy. Funny thing, though: neither of them said a word about arts education - the kinds of programs that introduce young people to the basics of painting and sculpture, music, dance and theater. Oh, I know Al and George are talking about "basics," too. But when they say basics, they mean "reading, writing and arithmetic." Sure, those things are important, but the politicians never seem to connect the dots and realize that arts training actually helps kids learn their three Rs. Every study shows that children who receive instruction in art and music are more focused, get better grades and score higher on standardized tests than children who don't.
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