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By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2013
About a half-dozen people at a time pitched in Saturday to help Baltimore artist Wilson Kemp complete a mural during Artscape. They crouched near the bottom of the canvas, perched on a step stool or squeezed in somewhere in the middle, ignoring the heat as they gripped paint brushes and zeroed in on their own small corners of a bigger picture. At the 32nd annual Baltimore festival, it was community art in progress. The grassy park across from the Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall became home to the first ever "10,000 brushes" project, billed as a "mural experience" during the event that calls itself America's biggest free arts festival.
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NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | September 12, 2013
A few weeks ago, the Havre de Grace Art Show celebrated its 50th annual incarnation, and this weekend the Bel Festival of the Arts will mark its 48th year. The two events are evidence of the enduring practicality of art in everyday life. It is easy to be critical of events like the two shows. Certainly the Million Dollar Mile aspect of the Havre de Grace show, which sought to showcase world class fine art in the city half a century ago, has faded as folk art and crafts have taken center stage.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | October 23, 2008
If you're near Federal Hill on Sunday afternoon, and 200 people simultaneously drop to their knees and begin crawling on the ground, you might think that you're witnessing a mass, public-spirited search for a lost contact lens. You'd be completely wrong, but also kind of right. Public Moves Federal Hill has nothing to do with locating a tinted disc roughly the size of a fingernail. But the community art project has everything to do with seeing the world from a sharper, more focused point of view.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2013
About a half-dozen people at a time pitched in Saturday to help Baltimore artist Wilson Kemp complete a mural during Artscape. They crouched near the bottom of the canvas, perched on a step stool or squeezed in somewhere in the middle, ignoring the heat as they gripped paint brushes and zeroed in on their own small corners of a bigger picture. At the 32nd annual Baltimore festival, it was community art in progress. The grassy park across from the Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall became home to the first ever "10,000 brushes" project, billed as a "mural experience" during the event that calls itself America's biggest free arts festival.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | September 12, 2013
A few weeks ago, the Havre de Grace Art Show celebrated its 50th annual incarnation, and this weekend the Bel Festival of the Arts will mark its 48th year. The two events are evidence of the enduring practicality of art in everyday life. It is easy to be critical of events like the two shows. Certainly the Million Dollar Mile aspect of the Havre de Grace show, which sought to showcase world class fine art in the city half a century ago, has faded as folk art and crafts have taken center stage.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2012
Soon after gunfire broke out about 8 p.m. along Greenmount Avenue in North Baltimore on Tuesday, city police officers already parked in the area found three victims with gunshot wounds — one of them, a 16-year-old boy, unresponsive. The boy, identified Wednesday morning as Daniel Pearson, was pronounced dead at a local hospital at 8:22 p.m., according to Detective Vernon Davis, a police spokesman. The two other victims, men ages 33 and 20, were also sent to hospitals and were in stable condition Wednesday morning, police said.
SPORTS
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2012
Art Modell did not just play a major role in the sports life of Baltimore. He and his wife Pat were among the region's most generous donors to the city's cultural institutions, including the Lyric Opera House , Walters Art Museum , Baltimore Museum of Art and Baltimore Symphony Orchestra. "When Art brought his team to our great city, he brought back to Baltimore the energy and excitement that we had lost years before," Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said in a statement.
NEWS
By John Harding | June 1, 2011
Curtain up! Artform has a new face and a new address, but it's the same good source for local cultural notes. Our staff of  arts writers — Mike Giuliano, Carolyn Kelemen and myself — are here to preview the worthy events you might want to keep in mind when planning your calendar.  
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | June 6, 2000
The city of Westminster officially approved last night the $310,000 purchase of the Carroll Theater, paving the way for a performing and community arts center downtown. In a brief meeting, the Westminster Common Council exercised its option to buy the 70-year-old Main Street building from the Church of the Open Door, which has owned the property about 10 years and held its Sunday bus ministry services there. With an estimated $500,000 in renovations, the former movie theater will become the center for the Carroll County Arts Council, which has about 1,000 members.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | June 6, 2000
The city of Westminster officially approved last night the $310,000 purchase of the Carroll Theater, paving the way for a performing and community arts center downtown. In a brief meeting, the Westminster Common Council exercised its option to buy the 70-year-old Main Street building from the Church of the Open Door, which has owned the property about 10 years and held its Sunday bus ministry services there. With an estimated $500,000 in renovations, the former movie theater will become the center for the Carroll County Arts Council, which has about 1,000 members.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2012
Soon after gunfire broke out about 8 p.m. along Greenmount Avenue in North Baltimore on Tuesday, city police officers already parked in the area found three victims with gunshot wounds — one of them, a 16-year-old boy, unresponsive. The boy, identified Wednesday morning as Daniel Pearson, was pronounced dead at a local hospital at 8:22 p.m., according to Detective Vernon Davis, a police spokesman. The two other victims, men ages 33 and 20, were also sent to hospitals and were in stable condition Wednesday morning, police said.
SPORTS
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2012
Art Modell did not just play a major role in the sports life of Baltimore. He and his wife Pat were among the region's most generous donors to the city's cultural institutions, including the Lyric Opera House , Walters Art Museum , Baltimore Museum of Art and Baltimore Symphony Orchestra. "When Art brought his team to our great city, he brought back to Baltimore the energy and excitement that we had lost years before," Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said in a statement.
NEWS
By John Harding | June 1, 2011
Curtain up! Artform has a new face and a new address, but it's the same good source for local cultural notes. Our staff of  arts writers — Mike Giuliano, Carolyn Kelemen and myself — are here to preview the worthy events you might want to keep in mind when planning your calendar.  
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | October 23, 2008
If you're near Federal Hill on Sunday afternoon, and 200 people simultaneously drop to their knees and begin crawling on the ground, you might think that you're witnessing a mass, public-spirited search for a lost contact lens. You'd be completely wrong, but also kind of right. Public Moves Federal Hill has nothing to do with locating a tinted disc roughly the size of a fingernail. But the community art project has everything to do with seeing the world from a sharper, more focused point of view.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jennifer Choi and Jennifer Choi,Sun reporter | April 17, 2008
Gregg Wilhelm wants literary arts to step out of the shadows of its more sociable cousins. He's the helmsman of CityLit Festival V, a daylong celebration of the written word, which takes over the Enoch Pratt Free Library's Central Library on Saturday. "Literary arts are just as important and creative and enlightening as going to the BMA or Center Stage," said Wilhelm. "But they have this weird dilemma of often being created and consumed in solitude." The festival, which includes panel discussions, workshops, readings and appearances by several local authors, aims to show the public that literary arts can function as a more community-based activity.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | September 19, 2007
The exhibition of African-American paintings and works on paper at the Zenith Gallery in Washington is one of those rarest of art-world events, a gallery show where most of the artworks on display are not for sale. The Freedom Place Collection includes works by Romare Bearden, Benny Andrews, Alma Thomas, Robert Freeman and Richard Yarde. It belongs to a local couple, Washington attorney Stuart Bloch and his wife, Julia Chang Bloch, who began collecting in the late 1970s, when the value of artworks by African-Americans was not widely appreciated.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | February 24, 2004
In the first decades of the 20th century, Andre Kertesz, Jacque-Henri Lartigue and Henri Cartier-Bresson invented what is known as "street photography," the artful snapshooting of people captured as they go about their business in public places. Baltimore photographer Linda Day Clark is an heir to that tradition, and as her show on view at the University of Maryland, Eastern Shore through the end of this month demonstrates, she is a contemporary master of the genre. Many of the photographs in the show were taken on the streets on and around North Avenue, where the artist has lived and worked for the past 15 years.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | September 19, 2007
The exhibition of African-American paintings and works on paper at the Zenith Gallery in Washington is one of those rarest of art-world events, a gallery show where most of the artworks on display are not for sale. The Freedom Place Collection includes works by Romare Bearden, Benny Andrews, Alma Thomas, Robert Freeman and Richard Yarde. It belongs to a local couple, Washington attorney Stuart Bloch and his wife, Julia Chang Bloch, who began collecting in the late 1970s, when the value of artworks by African-Americans was not widely appreciated.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | February 24, 2004
In the first decades of the 20th century, Andre Kertesz, Jacque-Henri Lartigue and Henri Cartier-Bresson invented what is known as "street photography," the artful snapshooting of people captured as they go about their business in public places. Baltimore photographer Linda Day Clark is an heir to that tradition, and as her show on view at the University of Maryland, Eastern Shore through the end of this month demonstrates, she is a contemporary master of the genre. Many of the photographs in the show were taken on the streets on and around North Avenue, where the artist has lived and worked for the past 15 years.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | June 6, 2000
The city of Westminster officially approved last night the $310,000 purchase of the Carroll Theater, paving the way for a performing and community arts center downtown. In a brief meeting, the Westminster Common Council exercised its option to buy the 70-year-old Main Street building from the Church of the Open Door, which has owned the property about 10 years and held its Sunday bus ministry services there. With an estimated $500,000 in renovations, the former movie theater will become the center for the Carroll County Arts Council, which has about 1,000 members.
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