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NEWS
By Jonathan Bor | November 17, 1991
A fledgling army of community activists dedicated itself yesterday to mounting a war against the urban habits that have made many of Baltimore's streams inhospitable for fish or even a leisurely walk along their banks.Organizers for the non-profit group Save Our Streams shared tactics with about 50 neighborhood leaders who gathered for a planning session at the Liberty Medical Center. But, the organizers said, it will ultimately be up to the leaders to clean up the mud, tires and assorted debris that clog city streams.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
State officials have abandoned plans for a rail cargo facility in an economically depressed corner of West Baltimore, amid vocal opposition from residents and diminishing political will. With the state withdrawing more than $30 million in funding, the CSX Transportation facility envisioned for the city's Morrell Park neighborhood will not be built, Maryland Transportation Secretary James T. Smith said Thursday. CSX and the port of Baltimore had been counting on using the facility to help move additional cargo.
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NEWS
By Christina Bittner and Christina Bittner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 31, 2000
THE START of a new year is the time to plan for the future and make a few resolutions. At the top of my list are to focus on the future instead of the past and to finish reading James Joyce's "Ulysses." Note, I said to finish reading it; I didn't say anything about understanding it. I then thought about the possibility of a collective resolution. For example, if the residents of Brooklyn Park could make a resolution for the community, what would it be? The range of possibilities seemed immense.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2014
For the second time this week, family and friends of Oscar Torres gathered in public Friday to mourn his death, worrying, they say, that without holding vigils his killing will be forgotten and the person who shot him during a robbery will go free. About 50 people crammed into the front room of the family's rowhouse in Southwest Baltimore, huddled around a memorial of white roses and pictures. They sang and prayed in Spanish before Torres' mother, Ernestina Torres, led the group the few blocks north to where he was killed.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | June 30, 1999
In a move that pleases developers but angers most community activists, Howard County Executive James N. Robey is keeping Joseph W. Rutter Jr., his controversial planning director, along with every other department head he inherited from Charles I. Ecker, his Republican predecessor."
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | December 15, 2003
Hoping to quell criticism from community groups, Baltimore County Executive James T. Smith Jr. has reversed a decision that limited their role in his high-profile community redevelopment program. The change in strategy is part of an unprecedented effort to build support for the legislation, a top priority for the executive, but a source of confusion for community activists and others. Tomorrow, Smith will go so far as to hold an open meeting in his office to solicit input on how best to get input on his bill.
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | February 24, 1998
A proposal to require narrow, curved roads in new Howard County housing developments has angered some community activists, but it won solid support in the County Council last night.Administration officials have pushed the road standards as a way to slow speeding motorists and preserve natural features such as hills, trees and rocks.The proposal has angered some community activists, who contend that the new roads will be more dangerous, not less.In a work session last night, the County Council disagreed.
NEWS
By Dan Morse and Dan Morse,SUN STAFF | June 6, 1997
The delayed, much-anticipated renovation of the Long Reach Village Center will begin next week, a spokeswoman for Safeway grocery chain said yesterday."
NEWS
July 6, 1998
IT'S A shame that, after investing two years and endlessly debating an overhaul of its antiquated, overly restrictive home-based business law, Baltimore County ended up with a feeble measure whose sole accomplishment consists of legalizing computers and fax machines.The effort to make it easier for people to work unobtrusively at home ran into a giant roadblock: community leaders who are squeamish about any kind of commerce in residential neighborhoods. It goes without saying that residential areas are not the place for businesses that bring a stream of traffic, noise, smells or visual pollution.
NEWS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 6, 2004
Courtney Speed, a longtime Turners Station resident and activist, remembers the first time she visited the historic waterfront community that became her home almost 45 years ago. "I was struck with awe," Speed said of the mostly African-American neighborhood next to Dundalk and across Bear Creek from Bethlehem Steel Corp. "The ambiance of the community was really superb." Although Speed did not see it during its heyday in the 1940s and 1950s, she later became impassioned with the neighborhood's rich history.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2014
Martha E. Roach, a retired seamstress and teacher's assistant who was a Sharp Leadenhall community activist, died of pneumonia Saturday at Howard County General Hospital. She was 90 and had lived in South Baltimore. Born Martha Eleanor Tilghman in Baltimore, she was raised on Laurens Street. She attended Booker T. Washington Junior High School and later received an equivalency diploma. She was a seamstress at the old Raleigh men's clothing manufacturing plant in Southwest Baltimore for many years.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2012
Benjamin C. Whitten, a prominent Baltimore educator and community activist who served as president of the Baltimore Urban League, died Sept. 21 of cancer at Good Samaritan Hospital. The Morgan Park resident was 89. "Ben was a true giant in the Baltimore public school system and could easily have been superintendent. He knew the system inside and out," said Dr. Walter G. Amprey, who was superintendent from 1991 to 1997. "He wore many hats and was a giant in both education and civil rights.
NEWS
September 22, 2011
Jacques Kelly 's obituary for Dennis Livingston (Sept. 21) was certainly fitting in as much as words can capture the essence of someone. Mr. Livingston was one of larger than life figures who remained on the battlefield to the end while fighting for jobs, justice, the environment and neighborhoods. Actually, his support of great populist causes was more extensive and profound than can be made clear in mere words. He was a good brother in the struggle. Most recently, he stood with the residents of Greenmount West in questioning the use of a community school once promised to the neighborhood.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2011
In the mind of Cleaven L. Williams Jr., the stabbing death of his wife on a Baltimore street was a tragedy that took place outside his control. The event, he said in court Friday, rendered him a victim, too. In sentencing the 35-year-old defendant to life in prison, Baltimore Circuit Judge Timothy J. Doory admonished him to "accept 100 percent responsibility" for killing Veronica Graves Williams on Nov. 17, 2008, something he avoided doing during his...
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 28, 2011
Mary Rosemond, a Rosemont neighborhood activist who successfully fought Baltimore's "Highway to Nowhere," died of heart disease Jan. 18 at the Spring Arbor assisted-living center near her daughter's home in Timberlake, N.C. She was 85. Born Mary Elizabeth Morgan in Jacksonville, Fla., she was a graduate of the Boylan Haven Girl's School and earned a bachelor's degree from Hampton University. She moved to Baltimore nearly 60 years ago and joined the Baltimore public school system.
NEWS
February 4, 2010
We just love reading about the beloved Senator Theatre and the "locals" that want the best for their community. Some don't want Towson University invading, some don't want others that will tear down an interior historic wall. How many of the community "activists" in good old Govans have ever run a business? If they want an example of what "good" some active community organizations do, tell them to venture to 5721-5723 York Rd. (the address for the nearby Senator is 5904) and look at two boarded-up businesses covered with graffiti.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Timothy B. Wheeler and Joe Mathews and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | July 31, 1996
With the federal government playing matchmaker, community activists and chemical plant executives in industrialized South Baltimore and northern Anne Arundel County plan to gather tonight for an uneasy summit on how to improve the local environment.The meeting at St. Athanasius Church at Church and Prudence streets is the kickoff for the "Community Partnership for Environmental Protection," a year-old effort by the Environmental Protection Agency to forge an atmosphere of trust and cooperation in the gritty old waterfront neighborhoods of Brooklyn, Cherry Hill, Curtis Bay, Fairfield, Hawkins Point and Wagner's Point.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | December 17, 2003
Amid demands from community leaders for more input into his redevelopment bill, Baltimore County Executive James T. Smith Jr. agreed last night to slow down the process, hold a series of public meetings and establish an advisory group to study possible amendments. Seeking to solidify support for the bill, Smith held an open house in his office and set out a new timetable that would get legislation to the County Council in April and involve more residents than were consulted by the internal committee Smith used to craft his plan.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper | julie.scharper@baltsun.com | January 15, 2010
Baltimore City Council President Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake named a five-member team to guide her transition to the mayor's office, a group that includes several lawyers, a community activist and a well-known lobbyist and political strategist. The group will review city agencies to "ensure all public and taxpayer funds are used in the most effective and efficient manner," recruit additional transition team members and evaluate policy in six broad areas. "Now more than ever, Baltimore needs innovative fiscal reform that protects core services, especially public safety, public education and job creation efforts," said Rawlings-Blake, who will take office Feb. 4, after the resignation of Mayor Sheila Dixon.
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