Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCommunications System
IN THE NEWS

Communications System

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | May 18, 2003
A Pittsburgh company has been chosen to build a 330-foot microwave tower in the Stoney Forest area of Carsins Run Road, part of a statewide update of emergency communications, the state Department of Budget and Management announced last week. Work on the new tower, projected to cost about $323,000, is expected to begin after the state Board of Public Works formally approves the contract this month and should be complete in November, said Thomas Miller of the Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services Systems.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 12, 2012
Paying for the mistakes and lies of the staff at Stratford University is something you can look forward to if you or your child applies to Stratford. I have been enrolled at the university since it was under the name of Baltimore International College, and since Stratford took over, it has been a mess. I was dropped from a class and now I am being told it messed up my financial aid and the refund I was due. I always do my financial aid package early but the person in charge of attendance, a woman who was not only handling attendance but was school counselor has been fired.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 7, 1990
Comcast Cablevision of Harford County and Arts and Entertainment network will present a communications system to Joppatowne Library on Oct. 19.The communications system, valued at $3,000, includes A&E program books, a videocassette recorder and a television set.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2012
An activist investor's push for a sale or merger at TeleCommunication Systems Inc. may be gaining traction. J. Carlo Cannell has been accumulating shares and now holds a roughly 5.8 percent stake in the Annapolis company. In a letter to TCS last week, Cannell called for a sale or merger, citing the company's slumping stock price and lack of strategic direction. Such talk appears to be gathering momentum within the investment community, said analyst Scott Sutherland of Wedbush Securities, who has covered the company for several years.
BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley | January 9, 1992
Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. of Maryland has won a 10-year, $100 million contract from the U.S. Public Health Service to design, install and operate a communications system that will serve 23 government locations in Maryland.The contract, known as the Telecommunications Improvement Project, is expected to serve 32,000 lines initially in offices of the Food and Drug Administration, the National Institutes of Health and other government offices under the Public Health Service. The offices are engaged in such things as AIDS and cancer research, drug abuse prevention and food safety.
NEWS
By Bill Talbott and Bill Talbott,Staff Writer | September 14, 1993
Although no money has been appropriated for an 800 megahertz emergency communications system for police, fire and medic units in Carroll County, an application for the new frequencies has been approved by Region 20 of the Federal Communications Commission.Howard S. "Buddy" Redman Jr., chief of the bureau of emergency operations, told the county commissioners of the approval during the scheduled Department of General Services meeting with Commissioners Elmer Lippy and Julia Walsh Gouge yesterday.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | January 8, 2003
Anne Arundel County is embarking on a yearlong project to replace its 15-year-old police and fire communications system, a move that will give emergency workers a more reliable means of staying in contact, officials announced yesterday. Work begins next week on the 800-megahertz Motorola system, which will cost $12.7 million, county officials said. "This is something we have wanted and needed for a long time," said O'Brien Atkinson, president of the Anne Arundel County Fraternal Order of Police.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Evening Sun Staff | October 4, 1990
Imagine paying nearly 85 percent of the cost of a fancy new car, but not being able to drive it.That's not unlike the situation Baltimore County officials find themselves in. They're unable to use a brand new, $32 million 800 megahertz communications system because of communications software that won't fully function.The software is at the heart of the ambitious police and fire communications system that officials say will be unique once it's operating.But it isn't operating. It was supposed to go on line Jan. 31, but didn't.
NEWS
December 12, 2012
Paying for the mistakes and lies of the staff at Stratford University is something you can look forward to if you or your child applies to Stratford. I have been enrolled at the university since it was under the name of Baltimore International College, and since Stratford took over, it has been a mess. I was dropped from a class and now I am being told it messed up my financial aid and the refund I was due. I always do my financial aid package early but the person in charge of attendance, a woman who was not only handling attendance but was school counselor has been fired.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | June 18, 2002
The biggest problem anyone encountered during two weeks of field tests for Howard County's new 800-megahertz communications system was one angry dog - pretty good, considering six teams tested 500 locations throughout the county. Aside from the dog-chasing incident (no one was injured), the critical field-testing phase went off without a hitch, officials said. "We're very pleased with everything," said Motorola project manager Michael Ciampaglia. Ciampaglia and county officials said Motorola appears to have satisfied the $26.6 million system's contract requirements.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | September 17, 2012
TeleCommunication Systems Inc. is an Annapolis company that's racked up a big portfolio of technology and intellectual property around text messaging and E-911 services. The company's got a mix of government and commercial customers, and it routinely wins multi-million dollar federal contracts. As a result, it's a big employer in the area. But its stock price isn't doing so well. After peaking nearly $10 in late 2009, it's now down to $2.23  as of this morning. And that's got J. Carlo Cannell, managing member of Cannell Capital, apparently worried enough to start pressuring TSYS to come up with a clearer vision, and consider a sale or merger.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2011
Howard County officials are launching a system to send urgent messages directly from police and fire departments, as well as select information about other county services via text messages or email. The notification service, NotifyMeHoward, will allow county officials to provide emergency notifications from the National Weather Service and public safety officials, but it will also let subscribers customize which county agencies they receive information from. Users can choose to receive information on recreation and parks programs, public works road projects or government news releases — all from the same system, beginning Tuesday.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2010
TeleCommunication Systems Inc. of Annapolis, which specializes in secure mobile communications for military and commercial clients, said Monday it plans to buy Trident Space & Defense LLC, of Torrance, Calif. Trident specializes in engineering and electronics solutions for global space and defense markets. The amount of the deal was not disclosed but TCS said it involved a mix of cash and three million shares of Class A common stock. Trident, which projects revenue of about $40 million for next year, is owned by Admiralty Partners Inc., a private equity firm.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes | gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | February 15, 2010
TeleCommunication Systems Inc., an Annapolis-based mobile communication technology company, said Monday it deepened its relationship with a global map provider which supplies digital maps that underpin TCS's products. TCS signed an expanded agreement with Tele Atlas, a subsidiary of TomTom N.V., based in The Netherlands, that will enable the company to use global maps to underpin location-enhanced applications for mobile communications. TCS, which has had a relationship with Tele Atlas since 1999, had previously only used the company's North American maps.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and Jessica Anderson,Sun Reporter | July 11, 2008
Firefighters, police officers and other emergency workers across Maryland will be able to communicate on a uniform radio system, improving their ability to react to everything from car crashes to terrorist attacks, Gov. Martin O'Malley announced yesterday. O'Malley signed an executive order yesterday to establish a statewide communications system that will allow law enforcement and public safety personnel from different state, county and municipal agencies to use one emergency radio system.
NEWS
By ELLIE BAUBLITZ and ELLIE BAUBLITZ,SUN REPORTER | April 9, 2006
Nearly nine years ago, Carroll County installed a highly touted, advanced radio emergency communications system. But the Lineboro Volunteer Fire Department was still plagued by dead spots where communication was impossible. Now, a new 340-foot communications tower is up and running outside of Lineboro. It was officially placed in service at 3:15 p.m. March 31, said Randy Waesche Jr., the county's Emergency Communications Center coordinator. The county will hold a ribbon cutting for the tower at 1 p.m. Tuesday.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and Jessica Anderson,Sun Reporter | July 11, 2008
Firefighters, police officers and other emergency workers across Maryland will be able to communicate on a uniform radio system, improving their ability to react to everything from car crashes to terrorist attacks, Gov. Martin O'Malley announced yesterday. O'Malley signed an executive order yesterday to establish a statewide communications system that will allow law enforcement and public safety personnel from different state, county and municipal agencies to use one emergency radio system.
NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | May 11, 2003
Anne Arundel County Council members agree with County Executive Janet S. Owens that the county needs a new public-safety communications system - but they are still recovering from a case of sticker shock after learning this month that its cost has more than doubled. The fallout over the system, which has ballooned in cost to $35 million, has council members saying that Owens circumvented their authority. "We were blindsided," said Councilman Edward R. Reilly, a Republican from Crofton.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2005
During the Howard Street Tunnel fire, firefighters from the city and Baltimore County had to exchange radios to talk to one another as they battled the underground inferno. After a tanker truck flipped off an Interstate 95 overpass last year and exploded, some emergency officials used cell phones to get instructions. And during the 92-vehicle pileup in October on Interstate 95, some emergency workers relied on 911 dispatchers to communicate with others on the scene because there was no regional emergency communications network, authorities said.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.