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BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | July 27, 1994
WASHINGTON -- By the time the Federal Communications Commission's first auction of the public airwaves adjourned for the day yesterday, bids had more than doubled from Monday's steep opening round and were still climbing."
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NEWS
By Mark Trumbull and Mark Trumbull,Christian Science Monitor | September 17, 2006
Last week's firing of Hewlett-Packard Chairwoman Patricia Dunn has focused new attention on privacy breaches involving consumer phone records, and could jump-start new government efforts to protect the public. Security firms hired by Hewlett-Packard had apparently used a dubious technique known as "pretexting" - posing under false pretenses to obtain phone records of board members and news reporters - and are now being investigated by state and federal officials and by Congress. The moral of the story goes beyond Hewlett-Packard: If such an intrusion of privacy can happen to millionaire Silicon Valley power brokers, it might happen to you. "It's about every consumer ... who gets a monthly billing statement," says Marc Rotenberg, who heads the Electronic Privacy Information Center in Washington.
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BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Correspondent | November 2, 1994
WASHINGTON -- "If you bid it, they will come," Federal Communications Commission Chairman Reed Hundt cracked yesterday.And they did.Seventy-four competitors, ranging from AT&T Corp. to Vivian E. Warner of Crossville, Tenn., signed up to bid in the FCC's auction next month of 99 regional licenses for a new wireless telephone service, the FCC announced. In the Baltimore-Washington area, 23 have signed up to bid for the single license available.The Dec. 5 auction of licenses for broadband personal communications services (PCS)
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2005
Jay Salkini, Tecore Wireless Systems envisions the day when you and your cell phone will never be out of reach - whether in the air, on land or sea. Founded in 1991, the Columbia-based Tecore makes super-small equipment for worldwide wireless communications networks. Its gear is in use in such markets as Afghanistan, Somalia, Eritrea and Guam. Now the privately held company has developed a miniature cellular network for use aboard commercial or cruise ships, corporate jets or commercial airliners.
NEWS
By New York Times | June 28, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Striking similarities between nearly simultaneous computer malfunctions that disrupted local telephone service on the East Coast and in Los Angeles on Wednesday have raised questions among communications experts about the reliability of advanced networks that all the Bell telephone companies are now installing.The problems experienced by both Pacific Bell and the Chesapeake & Potomac Co., which serves District of Columbia, Maryland, Virginia and parts of West Virginia, involved computer programs on advanced call-routing equipment, which uses the same new technology, one being adopted throughout the communications industry.
NEWS
By Mark Trumbull and Mark Trumbull,Christian Science Monitor | September 17, 2006
Last week's firing of Hewlett-Packard Chairwoman Patricia Dunn has focused new attention on privacy breaches involving consumer phone records, and could jump-start new government efforts to protect the public. Security firms hired by Hewlett-Packard had apparently used a dubious technique known as "pretexting" - posing under false pretenses to obtain phone records of board members and news reporters - and are now being investigated by state and federal officials and by Congress. The moral of the story goes beyond Hewlett-Packard: If such an intrusion of privacy can happen to millionaire Silicon Valley power brokers, it might happen to you. "It's about every consumer ... who gets a monthly billing statement," says Marc Rotenberg, who heads the Electronic Privacy Information Center in Washington.
NEWS
By David Hess and David Hess,Knight-Ridder News Service | November 19, 1991
WASHINGTON -- If you're being annoyed by telephone sales pitches from total strangers -- or even worse, a computer -- help may be on the way.The House voted without dissent yesterday to short-circuit those nuisance phone solicitations. The Senate already has acted, and minor differences in the two bills are expected to be resolved quickly."The aim is not to eliminate the Brave New World of telemarketing," said Representative Edward J. Markey, D-Mass., "but rather to secure the individual's right to privacy."
BUSINESS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | November 26, 2003
WASHINGTON - Opponents of greater media concentration expressed outrage yesterday over a congressional maneuver that could allow more consolidation in the television industry. The move late Monday was a "total violation" of protocol, Sen. Ernest F. Hollings, a South Carolina Democrat, said in a statement. White House officials and Republican congressional leaders "went into a closet, met with themselves, and announced a `compromise"' on how many TV stations one company could own, he said.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | October 16, 1993
Eddie L. Edwards Sr., the Pittsburgh broadcasting executive who wants to run WNUV (Channel 54), responded yesterday to allegations that he is being used as a front by a powerful Baltimore family."
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | January 8, 1994
Pointing to a recent court decision that struck down federal restrictions on indecent broadcasting, officials at the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) said this week they might not be able to stop the company that employs Howard Stern, the radio personality, from buying more stations.Mr. Stern's chief critic at the FCC, James Quello, a commissioner, conceded Thursday that the commission would face big legal obstacles in any attempt to block Infinity Broadcasting Corp., Mr. Stern's employer, from buying three radio stations for $170 million.
BUSINESS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | November 26, 2003
WASHINGTON - Opponents of greater media concentration expressed outrage yesterday over a congressional maneuver that could allow more consolidation in the television industry. The move late Monday was a "total violation" of protocol, Sen. Ernest F. Hollings, a South Carolina Democrat, said in a statement. White House officials and Republican congressional leaders "went into a closet, met with themselves, and announced a `compromise"' on how many TV stations one company could own, he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | March 3, 2002
Big is big when it comes to television, and it's only likely to get bigger. A key federal appellate court late last month lifted bans on corporations owning cable and local broadcast properties in the same markets. The same panel of judges strongly questioned the legitimacy of U.S. laws that prevent companies from owning stations that reach more than 35 percent of U.S. television viewers. And the country's top regulator of the television business -- the chairman of the Federal Communications Commission -- has made it clear he's eager to sweep away what he sees as other archaic rules hampering innovation.
NEWS
February 25, 2001
Delaying tower imperils safety of Ellicott City The construction of the new communications tower in Ellicott City has been delayed for several months by the Federal Communications Commission ("Tower on hold pending review," Feb. 8). This allows for review of the effect the structure would have on Ellicott City's historic district. But the fact is that the tower would greatly help preserve property and save lives by providing adequate communications for emergency service crews. As chief of the Ellicott City Volunteer Fire Department, I have a number of concerns over the interruption of plans to build the communications tower.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | October 14, 1996
After a week of hearings pitting telephone giants against each other, Maryland's Public Service Commission now has less than a month to issue an order that will set the terms for competition in the local phone business.Under deadlines set by Congress, the commission will rule by Nov. 8 in an arbitration case between Bell Atlantic Corp. and AT&T Corp. over the prices AT&T will pay to lease parts of Bell Atlantic's phone network as it enters the local phone industry, said John Dillon, Bell Atlantic-Maryland vice president for external affairs.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney hTC and Timothy J. Mullaney hTC,SUN STAFF | October 7, 1996
An article in yesterday's editions of The Sun misspelled the name of Mary Vaden, director of regulatory affairs for Bell Atlantic-Maryland.The Sun regrets the error.The state is close to making key decisions that will pave the way for competition in the local telephone service business in Maryland, with the state Public Service Commission set to begin a week of critical arbitration hearings today pitting Bell Atlantic 00 Corp. against AT&T Corp., MCI Communications Corp. and two upstart carriers.
NEWS
By ROBERT L. WOODSON SR | June 25, 1995
Affirmative action policies have accomplished little toward their goal.The major effect of affirmative action and anti-discrimination policies has been a redistribution of black workers from small and medium-size firms to large companies and federal jobs, while black unemployment rates have remained twice those of whites.Not only have these policies failed, but they have often offered opportunities for flagrant abuse.In many cases race-based set-asides have amounted to no more than a cruel bait-and-switch game in which conditions of poor blacks were used to garner preferences that, ultimately, benefited upper-income blacks and white corporations.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney hTC and Timothy J. Mullaney hTC,SUN STAFF | October 7, 1996
An article in yesterday's editions of The Sun misspelled the name of Mary Vaden, director of regulatory affairs for Bell Atlantic-Maryland.The Sun regrets the error.The state is close to making key decisions that will pave the way for competition in the local telephone service business in Maryland, with the state Public Service Commission set to begin a week of critical arbitration hearings today pitting Bell Atlantic 00 Corp. against AT&T Corp., MCI Communications Corp. and two upstart carriers.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | October 14, 1996
After a week of hearings pitting telephone giants against each other, Maryland's Public Service Commission now has less than a month to issue an order that will set the terms for competition in the local phone business.Under deadlines set by Congress, the commission will rule by Nov. 8 in an arbitration case between Bell Atlantic Corp. and AT&T Corp. over the prices AT&T will pay to lease parts of Bell Atlantic's phone network as it enters the local phone industry, said John Dillon, Bell Atlantic-Maryland vice president for external affairs.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Correspondent | November 2, 1994
WASHINGTON -- "If you bid it, they will come," Federal Communications Commission Chairman Reed Hundt cracked yesterday.And they did.Seventy-four competitors, ranging from AT&T Corp. to Vivian E. Warner of Crossville, Tenn., signed up to bid in the FCC's auction next month of 99 regional licenses for a new wireless telephone service, the FCC announced. In the Baltimore-Washington area, 23 have signed up to bid for the single license available.The Dec. 5 auction of licenses for broadband personal communications services (PCS)
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | July 27, 1994
WASHINGTON -- By the time the Federal Communications Commission's first auction of the public airwaves adjourned for the day yesterday, bids had more than doubled from Monday's steep opening round and were still climbing."
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