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By New York Times News Service | May 15, 1993
MOSCOW -- Nine of the 15 former Soviet republics signed a declaration yesterday of their intent to form an economic "union" to try to restore cohesion to their relationships.While the agreement is only a declaration of intent, it was praised by Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin as a "turning point" in the Commonwealth of Independent States, the loose, 10-member group formed after the Soviet Union collapsed.Even Ukraine, which has been the most prickly about any encroachment on its new sovereignty, signed the declaration.
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NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau | January 14, 1994
MOSCOW -- Here in Russia, politicians describe their nation's changing relationship with Ukraine as a friendly embrace growing pleasantly warmer.Ukrainians, however, look northward and see Russian arms open for a bear hug that can lead only toward suffocation.In agreeing to nuclear disarmament -- in a document to be signed here today -- Ukraine's President Leonid Kravchuk was accepting the inevitable:Ukraine gets money from the United States to avert economic disaster and cheap fuel from Russia to keep its power plants running, but Russia gets the upper hand.
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NEWS
By Cox News Service | December 8, 1991
MOSCOW -- Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin said yesterday that the idea of preserving the Soviet Union was a "failure" and that the Soviet republics should move toward forming a commonwealth of independent states.Mr. Yeltsin, speaking in Minsk, used the words "the former Soviet Union" for the first time as he dismissed Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's plan to ratify a union treaty.Since the failed coup in August, Mr. Gorbachev has been ceding more and more power to the republics as an inducement to sign the treaty, which would give Moscow control of foreign and military affairs.
NEWS
October 10, 1993
The honor guards may have been removed from Lenin's mausoleum on Red Square but the empire Lenin and Stalin built from the suzerainty of Peter and Catherine the Great is flexing muscles. Russia, despite its current degradation, still is a big and mighty country. It has the world's largest stockpile of nuclear weapons. It has unchanged security needs. It wants to be heard and respected.This is the message that has been heard from Moscow in recent weeks. As soon as last week's rebellion was put down, it was heard again.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | December 16, 1991
The Soviet Union is dead. Long live the Commonwealth of Independent States!
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | January 23, 1992
The Supreme Court entered the presidential campaign with that Pennsylvania abortion case, just as Democrats hoped.If things get worse, Republicans will dump George and run Barbara.Baltimore is not only not building public housing, it wants to tear down what it has.Talk about Red scare. Russian prosecutors say the August coup plotters were commies.Aid for the Soviet Union, never! Alms for the Commonwealth of Independent States, but of course.Cheer up. The Lake Roland dam may not break.Bush has the right idea about improving the product of American industries.
NEWS
By New York Times | December 26, 1991
MOSCOW -- The Soviet state, marked throughout its brief but tumultuous history by great achievement and terrible suffering, died yesterday after a long and painful decline. It was 74 years old.Conceived in utopian promise and born in the violent upheavals of the "Great October Revolution of 1917," the union heaved its last breath in the dreary darkness of late December 1991, stripped of ideology, dismembered, bankrupt and hungry -- but awe-inspiring even in its fall.The end came with the resignation of President Mikhail S. Gorbachev to make way for a new "Commonwealth of Independent States."
NEWS
January 7, 1992
In the end, Georgian President Zviad Gamsakhurdia was a coward."I will hold until death," he declared on Christmas Day, foxholed in a bunker as his loyalists were trying to keep opposition gunners from taking over the government complex. Yesterday, he ignominiously fled in the cover of darkness to a neighboring republic after realizing he had lost a bloody struggle for power. "Not only the Georgia people but all the democratic forces of the world will celebrate this victory," a rebel commander declared.
NEWS
October 10, 1993
The honor guards may have been removed from Lenin's mausoleum on Red Square but the empire Lenin and Stalin built from the suzerainty of Peter and Catherine the Great is flexing muscles. Russia, despite its current degradation, still is a big and mighty country. It has the world's largest stockpile of nuclear weapons. It has unchanged security needs. It wants to be heard and respected.This is the message that has been heard from Moscow in recent weeks. As soon as last week's rebellion was put down, it was heard again.
BUSINESS
By Los Angeles Daily News | January 31, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- Lockheed Corp. and two other defense contractors have announced the creation of a jointly-owned company to dismantle and destroy nuclear weapons and other Cold War-era munitions.Called International Disarmament Corp., the company is believed be the first of its kind and could mark the beginning of a new industry for defense contractors -- destroying the weapons they have spent nearly 50 years building.IDC was formed by Calabasas, Calif.-based Lockheed; Babcock & Wilcox, a unit of New Orleans-based McDermott International Inc.; and Stamford, Conn.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 15, 1993
MOSCOW -- Nine of the 15 former Soviet republics signed a declaration yesterday of their intent to form an economic "union" to try to restore cohesion to their relationships.While the agreement is only a declaration of intent, it was praised by Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin as a "turning point" in the Commonwealth of Independent States, the loose, 10-member group formed after the Soviet Union collapsed.Even Ukraine, which has been the most prickly about any encroachment on its new sovereignty, signed the declaration.
BUSINESS
By Joyce Lain Kennedy and Joyce Lain Kennedy,Sun Features Inc | July 20, 1992
Dear Joyce: I am interested in a job in Eastern Europe, especially in Romania, since I have friends and family there and a great personal interest in the country. I have worked with heavy equipment for the past 10 years. Are U.S. government jobs available? -- S. M.Dear S. M.: More than 150,000 Americans work in civilian jobs overseas as employees of the U.S. government, the largest source of foreign employment.In career fields ranging from accounting to writing, chances are someone with your skills is plying them in the global workplace for Uncle Sam. But don't expect flash success in joining these ranks.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau | March 18, 1992
MOSCOW -- Loyal Communists tried their best to re-establish the Soviet Union yesterday but managed only to drive ignominiously about the countryside before meeting in an unlighted hall on a dairy farm.Attempts to organize a huge anti-government rally later in the day fared little better. Only about 10,000 Communist sympathizers turned up at a vast square near the Kremlin to call for the return of the Soviet Union, which was replaced in December by the Commonwealth of Independent States.The food riots that many have feared ever since prices rose dramatically Jan. 2 failed to materialize.
NEWS
March 9, 1992
Although the hostile feelings between the United States and the former Soviet Union have eased with the breakup of the U.S.S.R. into the Commonwealth of Independent States, spying continues on both sides. The CIA director says the United States needs to "dramatically" increase its "human intelligence collection" and the FBI says Russian spies are as active as ever. Eventually, Russian officials say, the number of spies will be scaled down, but the Russians would expect the United States to make reciprocal reductions.
BUSINESS
By Los Angeles Daily News | January 31, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- Lockheed Corp. and two other defense contractors have announced the creation of a jointly-owned company to dismantle and destroy nuclear weapons and other Cold War-era munitions.Called International Disarmament Corp., the company is believed be the first of its kind and could mark the beginning of a new industry for defense contractors -- destroying the weapons they have spent nearly 50 years building.IDC was formed by Calabasas, Calif.-based Lockheed; Babcock & Wilcox, a unit of New Orleans-based McDermott International Inc.; and Stamford, Conn.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | January 23, 1992
The Supreme Court entered the presidential campaign with that Pennsylvania abortion case, just as Democrats hoped.If things get worse, Republicans will dump George and run Barbara.Baltimore is not only not building public housing, it wants to tear down what it has.Talk about Red scare. Russian prosecutors say the August coup plotters were commies.Aid for the Soviet Union, never! Alms for the Commonwealth of Independent States, but of course.Cheer up. The Lake Roland dam may not break.Bush has the right idea about improving the product of American industries.
NEWS
January 12, 1992
Ukraine's dispute with Russia over the fate of former Soviet land troops and the Black Sea naval fleet is worrisome not only because of security reasons. With their vast territories edging toward chaos and hunger, these pivotal republics of the Commonwealth of Independent States should be focusing on far more urgent matters.This is no inconsequential tiff. Unless it can be resolved quickly, the quarrel may undo the frail cooperation among former Soviet republics.The Black Sea fleet is a potent force.
NEWS
March 9, 1992
Although the hostile feelings between the United States and the former Soviet Union have eased with the breakup of the U.S.S.R. into the Commonwealth of Independent States, spying continues on both sides. The CIA director says the United States needs to "dramatically" increase its "human intelligence collection" and the FBI says Russian spies are as active as ever. Eventually, Russian officials say, the number of spies will be scaled down, but the Russians would expect the United States to make reciprocal reductions.
NEWS
By STEVE H. HANKE | January 22, 1992
The State Department is hosting a conference today andtomorrow to coordinate distribution of aid to the new nations of the Commonwealth of Independent States. Even though the U.S. diplomats have indicated the conference will be restricted to discussions about so-called humanitarian aid and self-help programs, it may be politically difficult for Secretary of State James A. Baker III to hold off demands for more aid by the foreign aid lobby.Led by Boris Yeltsin's adviser, Harvard University professor Jeffrey Sachs, the aid lobby is in full swing.
NEWS
January 12, 1992
Ukraine's dispute with Russia over the fate of former Soviet land troops and the Black Sea naval fleet is worrisome not only because of security reasons. With their vast territories edging toward chaos and hunger, these pivotal republics of the Commonwealth of Independent States should be focusing on far more urgent matters.This is no inconsequential tiff. Unless it can be resolved quickly, the quarrel may undo the frail cooperation among former Soviet republics.The Black Sea fleet is a potent force.
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