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NEWS
By Cox News Service | March 21, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Nonwhite Americans are twice as likely to lack health insurance as whites, and almost one-third of them say they have little or no choice of where they receive medical care, according to a study released yesterday.The survey by the Commonwealth Fund, a national philanthropy group involved in health and social policy research, also found that nonwhite adults were 50 percent more likely than white adults to report problems paying for medical care.The survey was released as Congress is considering cuts in Medicaid for the poor as part of its drive to cut the federal budget deficit.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Catherine E. Pugh and Dan K. Morhaim | March 10, 2014
This summer, Gov. Martin O'Malley and public health leaders justly celebrated the fact that infant mortality in our state has been driven to a new record low. By increasing access to care and outreach for new mothers and their babies - particularly in low-income communities - Maryland's infant mortality rate fell by 21 percent between 2008 and 2012. This is a tremendous achievement. But this hard won progress - as well as access for all expectant mothers - is at risk as we confront a looming obstetrics crisis: multi-million dollar medical malpractice judgments that are driving even higher the already high cost of medical liability.
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NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | September 30, 1992
Elderly Americans are more satisfied with life than the elderly in other developed countries. They also seem more active, more independent, generally healthy and happy with the quality of their medical care.Those findings are part of a unique five-nation survey, released yesterday, in which older people were questioned about their attitudes toward everything from health to loneliness.Older Americans reported being "very satisfied with life" twice as often as the elderly in Japan and 50 percent more often than the elderly in western Germany.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2011
When the Obama administration recently backed off a long-term insurance program that was part of the law to overhaul health care, we all lost. The so-called CLASS Act, which even supporters acknowledge had design flaws, would have allowed workers to voluntarily buy a long-term care policy regardless of their health. The benefit wasn't huge, but it might have been enough to allow some seniors to remain in their homes. And it was better than nothing — which is what most people have now. But as it turned out, the program wasn't financially sustainable and was dropped before it ever launched.
NEWS
By Grace-Marie Turner | June 29, 2007
America's health care woes all could be solved with a government-run universal-coverage system. Or so says Michael Moore in his new film, Sicko, which claims that even Cuba's health care system is superior to ours. Although it's easy to dismiss Mr. Moore as a radical propagandist, his message is gaining traction in the policy community. The Commonwealth Fund, a prominent health policy research foundation, has produced a new study that also portrays government-run health systems as far superior to ours.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | September 30, 1992
Elderly Americans are more satisfied with life than the elderly in other developed countries. They also seem more active, more independent, generally healthy and happy with the quality of their medical care.Those findings are part of a unique five-nation survey, released yesterday, in which older people were questioned about their attitudes toward everything from health to loneliness.Older Americans reported being "very satisfied with life" twice as often as the elderly in Japan and 50 percent more often than the elderly in western Germany.
NEWS
By Julie Marquis and Julie Marquis,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 19, 2000
An alarming proportion of American men are "dangerously out of touch" with the health care system, failing to get routine checkups and delaying care even for potentially life-threatening conditions, according to a new report. Three times as many men as women had not seen a doctor in the previous year and one in three had no regular doctor, compared with one in five women in a 1998 survey of 4,350 men and women across the nation. A quarter of the men said they would wait "as long as possible" before seeking help for a health-care problem.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2010
Howard County is moving ahead with plans to convert a highly regarded health program for the uninsured into a low-cost regional insurance co-operative, despite the increasing pressure to reverse the national health care law that allows such an initiative. County officials are considering the creation of small neighborhood walk-in clinics for co-op members, staffed by a salaried doctor, a nurse, a care coordinator and a clerk. Eliminating the traditional fee-for-service system could deliver care more cheaply, advocates said.
NEWS
By Catherine E. Pugh and Dan K. Morhaim | March 10, 2014
This summer, Gov. Martin O'Malley and public health leaders justly celebrated the fact that infant mortality in our state has been driven to a new record low. By increasing access to care and outreach for new mothers and their babies - particularly in low-income communities - Maryland's infant mortality rate fell by 21 percent between 2008 and 2012. This is a tremendous achievement. But this hard won progress - as well as access for all expectant mothers - is at risk as we confront a looming obstetrics crisis: multi-million dollar medical malpractice judgments that are driving even higher the already high cost of medical liability.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2011
When the Obama administration recently backed off a long-term insurance program that was part of the law to overhaul health care, we all lost. The so-called CLASS Act, which even supporters acknowledge had design flaws, would have allowed workers to voluntarily buy a long-term care policy regardless of their health. The benefit wasn't huge, but it might have been enough to allow some seniors to remain in their homes. And it was better than nothing — which is what most people have now. But as it turned out, the program wasn't financially sustainable and was dropped before it ever launched.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2010
Howard County is moving ahead with plans to convert a highly regarded health program for the uninsured into a low-cost regional insurance co-operative, despite the increasing pressure to reverse the national health care law that allows such an initiative. County officials are considering the creation of small neighborhood walk-in clinics for co-op members, staffed by a salaried doctor, a nurse, a care coordinator and a clerk. Eliminating the traditional fee-for-service system could deliver care more cheaply, advocates said.
NEWS
By Grace-Marie Turner | June 29, 2007
America's health care woes all could be solved with a government-run universal-coverage system. Or so says Michael Moore in his new film, Sicko, which claims that even Cuba's health care system is superior to ours. Although it's easy to dismiss Mr. Moore as a radical propagandist, his message is gaining traction in the policy community. The Commonwealth Fund, a prominent health policy research foundation, has produced a new study that also portrays government-run health systems as far superior to ours.
NEWS
By Julie Marquis and Julie Marquis,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 19, 2000
An alarming proportion of American men are "dangerously out of touch" with the health care system, failing to get routine checkups and delaying care even for potentially life-threatening conditions, according to a new report. Three times as many men as women had not seen a doctor in the previous year and one in three had no regular doctor, compared with one in five women in a 1998 survey of 4,350 men and women across the nation. A quarter of the men said they would wait "as long as possible" before seeking help for a health-care problem.
NEWS
By Cox News Service | March 21, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Nonwhite Americans are twice as likely to lack health insurance as whites, and almost one-third of them say they have little or no choice of where they receive medical care, according to a study released yesterday.The survey by the Commonwealth Fund, a national philanthropy group involved in health and social policy research, also found that nonwhite adults were 50 percent more likely than white adults to report problems paying for medical care.The survey was released as Congress is considering cuts in Medicaid for the poor as part of its drive to cut the federal budget deficit.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | September 30, 1992
Elderly Americans are more satisfied with life than the elderly in other developed countries. They also seem more active, more independent, generally healthy and happy with the quality of their medical care.Those findings are part of a unique five-nation survey, released yesterday, in which older people were questioned about their attitudes toward everything from health to loneliness.Older Americans reported being "very satisfied with life" twice as often as the elderly in Japan and 50 percent more often than the elderly in western Germany.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | September 30, 1992
Elderly Americans are more satisfied with life than the elderly in other developed countries. They also seem more active, more independent, generally healthy and happy with the quality of their medical care.Those findings are part of a unique five-nation survey, released yesterday, in which older people were questioned about their attitudes toward everything from health to loneliness.Older Americans reported being "very satisfied with life" twice as often as the elderly in Japan and 50 percent more often than the elderly in western Germany.
NEWS
By Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | April 7, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Americans have a growing fear of rising health costs and decreasing medical benefits, a nationwide survey to be released tomorrow shows."
NEWS
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | September 18, 1995
Blacks and Hispanics are least likely to get routine medical care and most likely to be without health insurance, according to a Johns Hopkins University study released today.Because of those disparities, minorities are more likely to suffer from chronic illnesses and premature death, the report asserts.The study, an examination of "inequities" in the health care delivery system, says that while economic status helps explain many of the disparities, other factors also contribute, including language barriers, attitudes toward health care and even geography.
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