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By DAN BERGER | December 14, 1992
Clinton is fielding the first real conservative economic team since Eisenhower.What with the links between Mexican officials and drug cartels, NAFTA seems mainly about a common market in cocaine.More and more guns are being purchased legally from Maryland gun shops by upright citizens from whom they will be burgled.Every government wants each other to do more about Bosnia.
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NEWS
By Juliet Berger | June 8, 1998
THE MEETING last month of heads of state at the second Summit of the Americas in Santiago, Chile, was aimed at establishing a 34-nation Free Trade Area of the Americas by the year 2005. Regional and multilateral trade arrangements benefit participating nations whether they are advanced or newly industrialized. The United States should heed the arguments in favor of regulated free trade.In 1994, more than 60 percent of world trade took place within free trade arrangements, indicating the effectiveness of such arrangements in encouraging economic activity.
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NEWS
May 4, 1991
When Finland's President Mauno Koivisto arrives in Washington Monday for a two-day working visit, he will be a rare visitor: he is not asking President Bush for anything. Moreover, his country and the United States have no outstanding bilateral problems to settle.Indeed, Finland's preoccupation these days is with domestic economic difficulties. It is a reflection of the country's location in Scandinavia that many of those economic dilemmas are tied to the recent monumental changes elsewhere in Europe, particularly in the neighboring Soviet Union.
NEWS
October 19, 1997
THE NOBLE INTENT to meld Baltimore and Washington into a single economic market to attract new business ventures often seems, to put it mildly, like a work in progress.The two cities pursue separate bids for the Olympics when they would obviously be far stronger -- and less of a long-shot -- presenting one unified proposal.Politicians who represent the suburbs near Washington often seem to be at war in Annapolis with Baltimore area delegates, deeply resenting any aid flowing into the city.
NEWS
November 28, 1992
Some of the most familiar pairings in American annals migh not have prospered had the names been reversed.Roebuck and Sears.Costello and Abbott.Jill and Jack.A debate is now raging in corporate offices, think-tanks and government chambers over whether to call the new combined "common market" in this region the "Baltimore-Washington" metropolitan area, or the "Washington-Baltimore" area.Because the populace in the two regions ostensibly has more in common now, and because business leaders feel the consolidation would attract more international business and government aid to these parts, federal officials are expected to combine the two metropolitan areas into a single mega-market, on paper, by year's end.Fortunately, one criteria that the U.S. Office of Management and Budget does not use in deciding whether two metropolises merit a common market is how smoothly they decide whose name goes first.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Thomas and Kevin Thomas,Evening Sun Staff | December 5, 1991
The Baltimore and Washington common market may be feeling a recessionary pinch much like that of the rest of the nation. But, as far as the buying power of its residents is concerned, the area may be better able to withstand the pain.In fact, the Baltimore and Washington region has been ranked No. 1 in household buying income among the nation's top 10 market areas, according to a report released yesterday by the Washington/Baltimore Regional Association (WBRA).The group, a business advocacy organization, promotes the notion of a combined market area for Baltimore and Washington.
NEWS
By Robert Kuttner | September 18, 1992
HARLAN Cleveland, a great internationalist and diplomat, once observed that he still had grave reservations about world government "because I might not like it, and it might not like me." But despite the globalization of commerce, nation states still define citizenship, identity and economic security.Today, citizens of the United States and Europe, facing hard times, are freshly questioning whether "one world," or even one continent, is what they really want. As a consequence, two treaties, the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA)
NEWS
By DAVID W. BARTON Jr | December 8, 1993
Being a crybaby is hardly becoming to Baltimore. Worse, crying over losing a contest for an NFL football franchise wastes tears on the wrong object. A 26-to-2 vote sends a message. Apparently, Baltimore can't hear it.Baltimoreans seem fixed on the notion that an undeserving Jacksonville benefited from double-dealing by evil football-team owners. The real reason to cry, if Baltimoreans must, is that its city appears as ''a finished city,'' not a ''hot market'' or a citywith ''municipal passion.
NEWS
September 17, 1990
The train leading to a United States-Mexico free trade agreement has left the station and is heading down a fast track for approval before mid-decade. Now that Mexican President Carlos Salinas de Gortari has formally asked for negotiations, President Bush is in a position to request Congress' approval. He is expected to do so this week under a 90-day yes-or-no rule that should get officials to the bargaining table by next Spring.Despite presidential enthusiasm on both sides of the Rio Grande, the negotiations will be contentious and controversial.
NEWS
September 23, 1992
The federal government is expected to combine, on paper at least, the Baltimore and Washington areas into one megalopolis, stretching 200 miles from Berkeley County, W. Va. to Queen Anne's County. Appalachia meets the Eastern Shore -- in one common market? The change is solely for statistical purposes, but some people believe the change will help the region sell itself. The Washington market is now the eighth largest in the country. Baltimore is 18th. With 6 million-plus people, this joint metropolitan statistical area would rank fourth.
NEWS
By Daniel Berger | June 21, 1997
THE SUMMIT IN Amsterdam earlier this week of 15 members of the European Union -- the economic superpower-in-progress that used to be the Common Market -- faced an ambitious agenda. After 15 months of preparation, it would eclipse American power and the role the United States has played in Europe since 1945.It accomplished no such thing.The significance was blurred in the communique, which said they did some of all of it. But Europe is no more united today than it was last Saturday. The timetable for broader and deeper unification has been put off once more.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | July 3, 1996
In case a fully decorated, 1,000-square-foot suite with a premier view of the field, a wet bar, three television sets and wall-to-wall carpeting isn't enough to get you to sign up, the Ravens have tossed in a few sweeteners for skybox renters.Such as a chartered trip for two each season to an away game. And pre-game field passes to mingle with players and coaches. Round-the-clock use of the suite for business meetings and parties. They'll even fire up the stadium lights and scoreboard so your sales staff or birthday boy can run some plays on the field.
NEWS
October 22, 1995
LEAVE IT to the market economy to make real what theoreticians proposed several decades ago: a unified Baltimore-Washington region. The two areas, with vastly different economies and personalities, are drawing closer and closer. Business imperatives are accelerating the pace.In a few years, the region will have a single, consolidated electric utility serving the needs of folks in Washington, D.C., and Gaithersburg as well as Baltimore and White Marsh. The two areas also soon will have a unified health-care alliance, combining the Washington-area Medlantic Healthcare Group and the larger Helix Health network of hospitals (Church Home, Franklin Square, Good Samaritan, Union Memorial)
NEWS
By DAVID W. BARTON Jr | December 8, 1993
Being a crybaby is hardly becoming to Baltimore. Worse, crying over losing a contest for an NFL football franchise wastes tears on the wrong object. A 26-to-2 vote sends a message. Apparently, Baltimore can't hear it.Baltimoreans seem fixed on the notion that an undeserving Jacksonville benefited from double-dealing by evil football-team owners. The real reason to cry, if Baltimoreans must, is that its city appears as ''a finished city,'' not a ''hot market'' or a citywith ''municipal passion.
NEWS
January 22, 1993
The eggbeater whoop-whoop-whoop of helicopters could be heard over the tightly packed houses. Cherry-red police lights sliced the darkness. Residents checked and re-checked their door locks and stole glimpses out their windows in search of a person they hoped they'd never see.The Dontay Carter manhunt in Baltimore? No.This was the scene a few weeks ago in a suburban enclave near Bel Air. A police chase of a stolen vehicle on Interstate 95 led the armed thieves into a neighborhood off the highway.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | December 14, 1992
Clinton is fielding the first real conservative economic team since Eisenhower.What with the links between Mexican officials and drug cartels, NAFTA seems mainly about a common market in cocaine.More and more guns are being purchased legally from Maryland gun shops by upright citizens from whom they will be burgled.Every government wants each other to do more about Bosnia.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | October 15, 1992
Washington. --The fact that the North American Free Trade Agreement has caused Bill Clinton anxiety indicates why he causes anxiety: Some of his better instincts seem to flicker like candles in the wind when they conflict with the strong, steady appetites of some of his constituencies. Still, his endorsement of NAFTA -- grudging and guarded though it was, and not for the right reasons -- is a mildly encouraging portent of the probable Clinton presidency.It is said that the free-trade pact will, if ratified, create the world's largest common market, encompassing 365 million consumers, 20 million more than the European Community.
NEWS
By Daniel Berger | June 21, 1997
THE SUMMIT IN Amsterdam earlier this week of 15 members of the European Union -- the economic superpower-in-progress that used to be the Common Market -- faced an ambitious agenda. After 15 months of preparation, it would eclipse American power and the role the United States has played in Europe since 1945.It accomplished no such thing.The significance was blurred in the communique, which said they did some of all of it. But Europe is no more united today than it was last Saturday. The timetable for broader and deeper unification has been put off once more.
NEWS
November 28, 1992
Some of the most familiar pairings in American annals migh not have prospered had the names been reversed.Roebuck and Sears.Costello and Abbott.Jill and Jack.A debate is now raging in corporate offices, think-tanks and government chambers over whether to call the new combined "common market" in this region the "Baltimore-Washington" metropolitan area, or the "Washington-Baltimore" area.Because the populace in the two regions ostensibly has more in common now, and because business leaders feel the consolidation would attract more international business and government aid to these parts, federal officials are expected to combine the two metropolitan areas into a single mega-market, on paper, by year's end.Fortunately, one criteria that the U.S. Office of Management and Budget does not use in deciding whether two metropolises merit a common market is how smoothly they decide whose name goes first.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | October 15, 1992
Washington. --The fact that the North American Free Trade Agreement has caused Bill Clinton anxiety indicates why he causes anxiety: Some of his better instincts seem to flicker like candles in the wind when they conflict with the strong, steady appetites of some of his constituencies. Still, his endorsement of NAFTA -- grudging and guarded though it was, and not for the right reasons -- is a mildly encouraging portent of the probable Clinton presidency.It is said that the free-trade pact will, if ratified, create the world's largest common market, encompassing 365 million consumers, 20 million more than the European Community.
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