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NEWS
February 5, 2013
Regarding Michael Hill's recent column on sports cheating, despite his Shakespearian rhetoric, no quarter should be granted to Lance Armstrong, who for over a decade willfully and systematically lied, cheated and thumbed his nose at ethical behavior ("Fans crave what cheating provides," Jan. 25). Unfortunately, Mr. Hill's column promulgates the message of our country's increasingly influential sports and entertainment industry, which suggests that the primary role for the masses is to watch and be entertained by a small troop of elite athletes.
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NEWS
January 17, 2014
The root cause for inequality, especially concerning health and economic advancement, stems from the tendency among a subset of humans who patronize only those individuals who are subservient to them ( "Inequality is the new norm in the U.S.," Jan. 15). From that viewpoint, I credit the majority of people of the United States for bending over backward to get ahead in life without knowingly hurting others or looking the other away when confronted with injustice. If there is a change to be made, society must understand the factors that modulate new ideas.
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NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | April 29, 2007
I get my hair cut at this place called Tight-N-Up. It has pretty much all the basic barbershop amenities. You've got your TV, you've got your back issues of Sports Illustrated and Jet, you've got your spirited debates about sports, politics and music. Best of all, you've got a price tag on the sunny side of reality: Give the barber a twenty and you'll get change. I invite John Edwards to drop by sometime. We learned recently that the Democratic presidential aspirant paid $400 each for two haircuts in California.
NEWS
By Arnold Packer | November 5, 2013
"You get 35 cents per mile and $40 per day for meals. " Computing the per diem for a given trip is beyond the capacity of 29 percent - almost three in 10 - American adults. They cannot apply two steps to calculate with whole numbers and common decimals, percentages and fractions or perform other simple tasks with numbers. Only adults in Spain and Italy did worse than Americans in such skills. In Japan, fewer than one in 10 (8 percent) are so handicapped. Who is going to win in the competition for good jobs?
NEWS
January 17, 2014
The root cause for inequality, especially concerning health and economic advancement, stems from the tendency among a subset of humans who patronize only those individuals who are subservient to them ( "Inequality is the new norm in the U.S.," Jan. 15). From that viewpoint, I credit the majority of people of the United States for bending over backward to get ahead in life without knowingly hurting others or looking the other away when confronted with injustice. If there is a change to be made, society must understand the factors that modulate new ideas.
NEWS
By Arnold Packer | November 5, 2013
"You get 35 cents per mile and $40 per day for meals. " Computing the per diem for a given trip is beyond the capacity of 29 percent - almost three in 10 - American adults. They cannot apply two steps to calculate with whole numbers and common decimals, percentages and fractions or perform other simple tasks with numbers. Only adults in Spain and Italy did worse than Americans in such skills. In Japan, fewer than one in 10 (8 percent) are so handicapped. Who is going to win in the competition for good jobs?
NEWS
By DONALD R. MORRIS | February 12, 1991
Until the outbreak of the second World War, enlisted men were essentially nameless and faceless; officers, while entitled to more social respect, were also faceless -- until they reached flag rank, or broke aviation records.You could turn the services upside down and shake them without finding a married man under the rank of sergeant; they were blue-collar workers and, in time of war, cannon-fodder -- in all nations.Until Pearl Harbor, junior officers were forbidden by law to marry for five years after commissioning.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,Staff Writer | March 21, 1992
CHARLOTTE HALL -- Early crops sprouting along Route 5 this spring include the campaign signs of Rep. Steny H. Hoyer, a high-ranking Maryland Democrat brushed by the House banking scandal.In one farm field after another, passing motorists see the candidate's last name underscored by an elegant, flowing motif of Maryland's flag.Mr. Hoyer, who admitted last week that he wrote four bad checks, has to hope that voters will think of him in terms of the gold in the state flag and not the red -- which might remind them of huge federal deficits, of the half-billion-dollar savings and loan TC bailout, and of House members who wrote bad checks with impunity.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston | March 5, 2001
TOWSON UNIVERSITY freshman point guard Tamir Goodman is close to becoming a regular student-athlete again. After a three-year whirlwind media tour that included profiles by "60 Minutes," ESPN and Sports Illustrated, the young man who turned the college basketball world upside down because he is an Orthodox Jew with game will finally get to enjoy campus life like most students. Towson's basketball season came to a close when the Tigers fell to Delaware, 66-51, on Saturday night in the quarterfinals of the America East tournament.
NEWS
By michael sragow and michael sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | October 3, 2008
John Seabrook, the author of the original New Yorker story about Bob Kearns, the inventor of the intermittent windshield wiper, loves the movie adaptation with the same name, Flash of Genius. It retains every pungent line Seabrook put on paper, no matter how outlandish. It's exhilarating in an authentic, pathos-streaked way to see Kearns, through Greg Kinnear's inspired characterization of a wary obsessive, representing himself during his trial against Ford Motor Co. for stealing his design.
NEWS
February 5, 2013
Regarding Michael Hill's recent column on sports cheating, despite his Shakespearian rhetoric, no quarter should be granted to Lance Armstrong, who for over a decade willfully and systematically lied, cheated and thumbed his nose at ethical behavior ("Fans crave what cheating provides," Jan. 25). Unfortunately, Mr. Hill's column promulgates the message of our country's increasingly influential sports and entertainment industry, which suggests that the primary role for the masses is to watch and be entertained by a small troop of elite athletes.
NEWS
By michael sragow and michael sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | October 3, 2008
John Seabrook, the author of the original New Yorker story about Bob Kearns, the inventor of the intermittent windshield wiper, loves the movie adaptation with the same name, Flash of Genius. It retains every pungent line Seabrook put on paper, no matter how outlandish. It's exhilarating in an authentic, pathos-streaked way to see Kearns, through Greg Kinnear's inspired characterization of a wary obsessive, representing himself during his trial against Ford Motor Co. for stealing his design.
NEWS
By Rick Perlstein and Rick Perlstein,Chicago Tribune | September 9, 2007
FDR By Jean Edward Smith Random House / 858 pages / $35 Franklin Delano Roosevelt's beloved mother died in 1941. Her casket was carried to the grave by her most loyal servants, including a butler and chauffeur. The Secret Service was there, too, of course, but it hung far back from the ceremony. "I don't think we belong in there," said the president's personal bodyguard, Mike Reilly, "even if Congress says we do." He was referring to the intimacy of the moment. But you can also hear, in his nervousness, overtones of class.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | April 29, 2007
I get my hair cut at this place called Tight-N-Up. It has pretty much all the basic barbershop amenities. You've got your TV, you've got your back issues of Sports Illustrated and Jet, you've got your spirited debates about sports, politics and music. Best of all, you've got a price tag on the sunny side of reality: Give the barber a twenty and you'll get change. I invite John Edwards to drop by sometime. We learned recently that the Democratic presidential aspirant paid $400 each for two haircuts in California.
TOPIC
By Paul Burka and Paul Burka,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 25, 2004
The New Testament tells us that it is easier for a camel to walk through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter the kingdom of God. Political heaven, though, is a different story. Just look at the national tickets of the two major parties. Recent news articles have estimated that the combined holdings of the four candidates for president and vice president fall between $600 million and $1 billion. George W. Bush, Dick Cheney and John Edwards all have reported assets in the tens of millions of dollars, but none is in John F. Kerry's league: between $27 million and $57 million in assets that he owns personally or jointly with his wife, Teresa Heinz Kerry, plus $500 million to $800 million that Kerry's wife inherited from her late husband, an heir to the Heinz ketchup fortune.
NEWS
By John Eisenberg and John Eisenberg,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2004
Long known as "the sport of kings," thoroughbred horse racing has recently produced several winners more plebeian than royal. Last year, there was Funny Cide, winner of the Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes, owned by a hard-partying group of former high school buddies who came to the races in a yellow school bus. This year, there is Smarty Jones, the Derby winner and favorite tomorrow in the Preakness at Pimlico. The Pennsylvania-bred colt is based at Philadelphia Park - about as far from racing's major leagues as one can get. Their back-to-back high-profile successes raise the question: Is racing, once reserved for the wealthy, now a sport in which an Average Joe (or Josephine)
NEWS
By Rick Perlstein and Rick Perlstein,Chicago Tribune | September 9, 2007
FDR By Jean Edward Smith Random House / 858 pages / $35 Franklin Delano Roosevelt's beloved mother died in 1941. Her casket was carried to the grave by her most loyal servants, including a butler and chauffeur. The Secret Service was there, too, of course, but it hung far back from the ceremony. "I don't think we belong in there," said the president's personal bodyguard, Mike Reilly, "even if Congress says we do." He was referring to the intimacy of the moment. But you can also hear, in his nervousness, overtones of class.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,FILM CRITIC | May 7, 1993
If I told you the most successful film director in the world was named Ivan, you'd say "Huh?"Well, get ready to "Huh," hon.Ivan Reitman, whose "Dave" opens today in about a jillion theaters to glowing reviews and long lines, has very quietly become, if not the No. 1 director in the world, certainly the No. 1 comedy director. His movies have been sublimely successful: "Ghostbusters," still one of the highest-grossing comedies in the world; its sequel, which only made more than $100 million in domestic release; as well as "Twins," "Kindergarten Cop" and on back to two films that made Bill Murray a huge star: "Stripes" and "Meatballs."
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 29, 2003
One genuine small triumph of American Splendor is that the title isn't ironic. The movie is a splendid, inventive piece of urban Americana about that hardboiled original, Harvey Pekar, played with high-strung brilliance by a never-better Paul Giamatti. These days reviewers feel the understandable temptation to shower any good film with superlatives to snag readers' attentions. So this picture's endearing modesty - its pockmarked textures and human fallibilty - will surprise and, I hope, delight those who go to it expecting the bold, experimental extravaganza heralded in the blurbs.
NEWS
By Martin D. Tullai and Martin D. Tullai,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 8, 2002
Today marks the birth date of Harry S. Truman, born 118 years ago. He was a spunky, determined and highly rated president who will be remembered as: The first president to take office in the midst of a war. The only president since William McKinley who was not a college graduate. The president who ordered the atomic bomb dropped because he felt it would save American lives and end World War II quickly. The propounder of the Truman Doctrine, designed "to support free peoples who are resisting attempted subjugation by armed minorities or by outside pressure."
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