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By Ann G. Sjoerdsma | February 20, 2000
KITTY HAWK, N.C. -- The large sign next to the four roadside crosses reads "DRINKING + DRIVING CAN COST YOU A PRECIOUS GEM." Garnished in flowers, each simple white cross bears a name: Megan, Angie, Amanda, Shana. On April 6, 1999, at this site on Highway 158 in Kill Devil Hills, four 17-year-old girls last saw each other. The crash instantly killed Megan Blong, Angie McGrady and Amanda Geiger, all from New Jersey. Shana Lawler, whose family had recently moved to North Carolina's Outer Banks, died six days later.
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NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | November 2, 2000
RICHMOND, Va. - In a world where promises are broken and guarantees are usually anything but iron-clad, the political leaders of this state want to give sportsmen something they can take to the bank: the right to kill critters. On the ballot Tuesday is a one-sentence question, asking voters if they want to alter a constitution drafted 224 years ago by James Madison and company to include the right to hunt and fish. The measure is expected to pass. Across the country, hunters are flexing their political muscle at the voting booth this year, saying they are tired of being the prey of groups such as People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals and the Fund for Animals.
BUSINESS
January 6, 2002
Dear Mr. Azrael We had a house built and when the property was surveyed, metal boundary pins were put in. We knew where every pin was. My father would even scrape the mud off after it would rain so we could always find them. When the utility company came in to lay the cable for the house behind me, the pin disappeared. We called to complain and they passed us off to the subcontractor who did the trenching. The subcontractor said the boundary pin was not there when they trenched. This is absolutely wrong.
BUSINESS
October 16, 2005
Readers often ask what protections they have against problems in a house they bought that are not apparent or don't turn up in a home inspection. Until this month, the general answer in Maryland was "Not much." But now a new state law requires sellers of single-family residences to disclose "latent defects" of which they are aware that threaten the health or safety of the purchaser or an occupant. The new law, which took effect Oct. 1, represents a modest inroad on the long-standing common-law principle of caveat emptor - buyer beware.
NEWS
By Justin George and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
Montgomery County police investigators suspect a Clarksburg mother killed two young children who have been missing for more than a week, police said on Monday. Sarah Hoggle, 3, and Jacob Hoggle, 2, have been missing since Sept. 8. Authorities are investigating their mother, Catherine Hoggle, 27, in their possible deaths. Hoggle had also gone missing for a few days after her common-law husband became suspicious about the kids' whereabouts. "We keep a ray of hope that Sarah and Jacob will be reunited with their family," Police Capt.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau of The Sun | August 15, 1991
LONDON -- Sara Thornton entered the 12th day of her hunger strike in the Holloway prison here yesterday, and her woeful face is bothering Britain's conscience. It poses the question whether men and women are equal before the law.She is 36 years old and a murderer. She put a knife into her husband, Malcolm, while he was drunk. He had abused her during the 10 months of their marriage: On one occasion he knocked her unconscious; on another he broke a glass over her head. He was forever taunting her; he called her a whore.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 11, 1997
PONTIAC, Mich. -- Saying that any renewed attempt to prosecute Dr. Jack Kevorkian would be "an exercise in futility," the new Oakland County prosecutor, David Gorcyca, dismissed a long list of assisted-suicide charges his predecessor had filed against the retired pathologist and two assistants in October."
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff writer | November 10, 1991
A Harford Circuit Court judge has denied a request by a Havre de Grace contracting company for a summary judgment in its civil suit against the developers of the Major's Choice subdivision in Bel Air.Judge Cypert O. Whitfill's order, issued Monday, means that the case will be scheduled for trial. The trial has not been scheduled.The contractor, Majors Inc., is seeking $125,202 in damages from the Majors Choice Limited Partnership, Shehan & McGee Associates, andits two partners, Robert W. McGee and George Shehan, both of Bel Air.Majors Inc. contends in its suit, filed Sept.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,Anne Arundel Bureau of The Sun | October 30, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- School guidance counselors could be sued if they don't try to prevent a student's suicide, the Court of Appeals ruled yesterday.The decision sends the case of a Kensington man, whose 13-year-old daughter died in an apparent murder-suicide pact in November 1988,back to Montgomery County Circuit Court for a trial.Stephen Eisel had sued the school system, the superintendent, the principal and two guidance counselors at Sligo Middle School in Montgomery County because the counselors did not tell him that friends of Nicole Eisel had said she was discussing suicide.
NEWS
December 12, 1991
Unlike other individual rights guaranteed by the Bill of Rights, the right to a jury trial is also guaranteed in the body of the Constitution. The Sixth and Seventh amendments were added, however, to make sure such trials were fair and not subject to manipulation by the government. The Sixth Amendment deals with criminal prosecutions; the Seventh, with civil cases.The Sixth goes beyond the Constitution's bare guarantee of trial by jury to insist that the trial be "speedy" and "public," that the jurors be "impartial," that the accused be informed of "the nature and cause" of all charges, be able to compel testimony, examine the evidence and have a lawyer.
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