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by Annie Linskey | May 30, 2012
Maryland's legislative leaders today appointed a bipartisan panel to study the impact of recent court ruling that labeled pit bulls as 'inherently dangerous' for liability purposes and to make recommendations about possible legislative fixes. Five members from each chamber have been named, including three of the five delegates who introduced legislation aimed at overturning the court's ruling during the May special session in Annapolis. The 4-3 decision by the Maryland Court of Appeals came in April after the General Assembly's regular session expired, and drew outrage from dog owners who fear that thousands of pit bulls will be put down.
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | February 23, 2013
It's one of those things that make sense but we do not do: Have a nickel deposit on every bottle and can of beer, soda and all the other liquid beverages we drink. Maryland does not have it. Some states do. Every state should. I first looked into why Maryland is a no-deposit/no-return state 30 years ago, having been raised where this was done all the time. There have been attempts over the years to get a bottle-deposit law passed in Maryland, but it was always shot down. Tom Horton, my former columnist colleague at The Sun, once cited polls showing that as many as seven out of 10 Marylanders supported the idea.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 11, 1997
PONTIAC, Mich. -- Saying that any renewed attempt to prosecute Dr. Jack Kevorkian would be "an exercise in futility," the new Oakland County prosecutor, David Gorcyca, dismissed a long list of assisted-suicide charges his predecessor had filed against the retired pathologist and two assistants in October."
BUSINESS
November 21, 2004
I had a new home built four years ago. Unfortunately, the flashing for the windows was poorly done and rain can easily make its way underneath the siding. Over the years, and unknown to me, my house has been rotting. The problem became apparent only when I had water leaking into my basement. A handyman removed some siding, and the rot was so bad at points, that insulation could be seen sticking through the rotted fiberboard. The handyman has located other parts of the house that will need to be repaired.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff writer | November 10, 1991
A Harford Circuit Court judge has denied a request by a Havre de Grace contracting company for a summary judgment in its civil suit against the developers of the Major's Choice subdivision in Bel Air.Judge Cypert O. Whitfill's order, issued Monday, means that the case will be scheduled for trial. The trial has not been scheduled.The contractor, Majors Inc., is seeking $125,202 in damages from the Majors Choice Limited Partnership, Shehan & McGee Associates, andits two partners, Robert W. McGee and George Shehan, both of Bel Air.Majors Inc. contends in its suit, filed Sept.
NEWS
By New York Times | March 18, 1993
PHILADELPHIA -- In mid-January, Shilie Turner, 17, a high school senior who was one of the nation's most promising young female track stars, vanished from her neighborhood in the Overbrook section.Her mother made a series of emotional public appeals for her safe return, but a month later Miss Turner's body was found, hidden by bushes in a local park. She had been beaten and then shot six times.Now her mother, Vivian King, 42, has been charged with her murder, and acquaintances of the family have been left to wonder whether they should have paid closer attention to Miss Turner's complaints of an unhappy home life, and to her loud quarrels with her mother.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,SUN STAFF | October 25, 1995
Anne Arundel County taxpayers will not have to foot the bill for a former police officer accused of rape, an administrative panel has ruled.The officer, Michael Dennis Ziegler, had asked the county government to pay $1.05 million in damages that a U.S. District Court awarded a Laurel woman who accused him of rape.His attorney argued that the county should pay because Mr. Ziegler was on duty, in uniform and in his patrol car when the incident occurred.The county Board of Appeals voted unanimously to deny Mr. Ziegler's request, according to documents released this week.
NEWS
By Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | January 29, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- A correctional officer held hostage during last summer's uprising at the Maryland Penitentiary asked a Senate committee yesterday to approve a bill to impose sentences of up to 30 years for inmates who participate in such crimes.Lt. William K. Pitts was one of five men taken hostage by prisoners. He and two others were released within an hour, but two were kept in a C Dormitory cell for 23 hours.No one can know what his co-workers, Larry Hughes and Gary Wooten, endured on that hot July day, Mr. Pitts told the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee.
NEWS
By Staff report | July 2, 1993
A 16-year-old Westminster boy led state police on a high-speed chase early Wednesday that ended when he lost control and struck an embankment while attempting to turn right onto Old Baltimore Road.Police records indicate the driver was not injured. His passenger, another Westminster 16-year-old boy, received minor injuries but refused treatment.About 2:40 a.m. Wednesday, Tfc. Leonard Lucas saw a 1981 Ford "operating erratically" on Route 32 in Eldersburg.He signaled the car with siren and lights, but it did not stop.
NEWS
By Reginald Fields and Reginald Fields,SUN STAFF | June 13, 2003
A Baltimore City police officer was indicted yesterday by a city grand jury on perjury and misconduct in office charges after being suspended in March for allegedly making a false drug arrest. If convicted, Jacqueline A. Folio, 41, a 14-year veteran of the department, could receive a maximum of 10 years in prison for the perjury charge and whatever sentence a judge hands down for the misconduct charge, a common law offense. Police said Folio was involved March 27 in what they called an integrity sting.
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