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By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Evening Sun Staff Raymond L. Sanchez contributed to this story | August 16, 1991
New York City police are still investigating the death of a northwest Baltimore man who was robbed and shot five times as he and his common-law wife sat in a car in Queens.Police are looking for two Hispanic men in their 20s who police said approached Rickey George, 33, of the 3000 block of Mondawmin Ave., and his common-law wife at 1:25 a.m. yesterday as they sat in a rented 1990 Pontiac Sunbird in the 1600 block of Summerfield St. in Ridgewood.They were robbed of about $200 in cash and some jewelry, said Sgt. George Zaroogian, of the 104th precinct in Queens.
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NEWS
By John Perry Barlow | January 28, 1993
WITH quiet efficiency, our understanding of the first 10 amendments to the Constitution has been profoundly revised by the state and federal judiciary during the last couple decades, sparing us the untidy political melee of a constitutional convention. In light of these changes, a new Bill of Rights, based on current case law, might look something like what follows:AMENDMENT I.: Congress shall encourage the practice of Judeo-Christian religion by its own public exercise thereof and shall make no laws abridging the freedom of responsible speech, unless such speech is in a digitized form or contains material that is copyrighted, classified, proprietary or deeply offensive to non-Europeans, non-males, differently-abled or alternatively preferenced persons; or the right of the people to peaceably assemble, unless such assembly is taking place on corporate or military property or within an electronic environment; or to petition the government for a redress of grievances, unless those grievances relate to national security.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,Anne Arundel Bureau of The Sun | October 30, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- School guidance counselors could be sued if they don't try to prevent a student's suicide, the Court of Appeals ruled yesterday.The decision sends the case of a Kensington man, whose 13-year-old daughter died in an apparent murder-suicide pact in November 1988,back to Montgomery County Circuit Court for a trial.Stephen Eisel had sued the school system, the superintendent, the principal and two guidance counselors at Sligo Middle School in Montgomery County because the counselors did not tell him that friends of Nicole Eisel had said she was discussing suicide.
NEWS
December 12, 1991
Unlike other individual rights guaranteed by the Bill of Rights, the right to a jury trial is also guaranteed in the body of the Constitution. The Sixth and Seventh amendments were added, however, to make sure such trials were fair and not subject to manipulation by the government. The Sixth Amendment deals with criminal prosecutions; the Seventh, with civil cases.The Sixth goes beyond the Constitution's bare guarantee of trial by jury to insist that the trial be "speedy" and "public," that the jurors be "impartial," that the accused be informed of "the nature and cause" of all charges, be able to compel testimony, examine the evidence and have a lawyer.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 11, 1997
PONTIAC, Mich. -- Saying that any renewed attempt to prosecute Dr. Jack Kevorkian would be "an exercise in futility," the new Oakland County prosecutor, David Gorcyca, dismissed a long list of assisted-suicide charges his predecessor had filed against the retired pathologist and two assistants in October."
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff writer | November 10, 1991
A Harford Circuit Court judge has denied a request by a Havre de Grace contracting company for a summary judgment in its civil suit against the developers of the Major's Choice subdivision in Bel Air.Judge Cypert O. Whitfill's order, issued Monday, means that the case will be scheduled for trial. The trial has not been scheduled.The contractor, Majors Inc., is seeking $125,202 in damages from the Majors Choice Limited Partnership, Shehan & McGee Associates, andits two partners, Robert W. McGee and George Shehan, both of Bel Air.Majors Inc. contends in its suit, filed Sept.
NEWS
By Justin George and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
Montgomery County police investigators suspect a Clarksburg mother killed two young children who have been missing for more than a week, police said on Monday. Sarah Hoggle, 3, and Jacob Hoggle, 2, have been missing since Sept. 8. Authorities are investigating their mother, Catherine Hoggle, 27, in their possible deaths. Hoggle had also gone missing for a few days after her common-law husband became suspicious about the kids' whereabouts. "We keep a ray of hope that Sarah and Jacob will be reunited with their family," Police Capt.
NEWS
By Gregory P. Kane | October 14, 1993
DURING the seventh day of deliberations in the case of the two men accused of beating truck driver Reginald Denny during last year's Los Angeles riots, one of the regular jurors was replaced by an alternate. The jurors had to renew deliberations from the beginning, because the alternate was not in on the original deliberations.The juror, an elderly woman known only as Juror 373, was dismissed for "failing to deliberate as the law defines it," the elegant legalese the judge in the case used.
NEWS
By Staff report | July 2, 1993
A 16-year-old Westminster boy led state police on a high-speed chase early Wednesday that ended when he lost control and struck an embankment while attempting to turn right onto Old Baltimore Road.Police records indicate the driver was not injured. His passenger, another Westminster 16-year-old boy, received minor injuries but refused treatment.About 2:40 a.m. Wednesday, Tfc. Leonard Lucas saw a 1981 Ford "operating erratically" on Route 32 in Eldersburg.He signaled the car with siren and lights, but it did not stop.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,SUN REPORTER | September 17, 2006
In the news Represented Mount Vernon-area residents who challenged the Archdiocese of Baltimore's demolition of the Rochambeau, a 100-year-old apartment building at North Charles and West Franklin streets in Baltimore. Occupation Lawyer with Liebmann and Shively. Also executive director of the Calvert Institute for Policy Research. Author of eight nonfiction books, most recently The Common Law Tradition: A Collective Portrait of Five Legal Scholars. Career highlights Came to Baltimore in 1963 as law clerk to Court of Appeals Chief Judge Frederick W. Brune.
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