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NEWS
by Annie Linskey | May 30, 2012
Maryland's legislative leaders today appointed a bipartisan panel to study the impact of recent court ruling that labeled pit bulls as 'inherently dangerous' for liability purposes and to make recommendations about possible legislative fixes. Five members from each chamber have been named, including three of the five delegates who introduced legislation aimed at overturning the court's ruling during the May special session in Annapolis. The 4-3 decision by the Maryland Court of Appeals came in April after the General Assembly's regular session expired, and drew outrage from dog owners who fear that thousands of pit bulls will be put down.
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | February 23, 2013
It's one of those things that make sense but we do not do: Have a nickel deposit on every bottle and can of beer, soda and all the other liquid beverages we drink. Maryland does not have it. Some states do. Every state should. I first looked into why Maryland is a no-deposit/no-return state 30 years ago, having been raised where this was done all the time. There have been attempts over the years to get a bottle-deposit law passed in Maryland, but it was always shot down. Tom Horton, my former columnist colleague at The Sun, once cited polls showing that as many as seven out of 10 Marylanders supported the idea.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 11, 1997
PONTIAC, Mich. -- Saying that any renewed attempt to prosecute Dr. Jack Kevorkian would be "an exercise in futility," the new Oakland County prosecutor, David Gorcyca, dismissed a long list of assisted-suicide charges his predecessor had filed against the retired pathologist and two assistants in October."
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff writer | November 10, 1991
A Harford Circuit Court judge has denied a request by a Havre de Grace contracting company for a summary judgment in its civil suit against the developers of the Major's Choice subdivision in Bel Air.Judge Cypert O. Whitfill's order, issued Monday, means that the case will be scheduled for trial. The trial has not been scheduled.The contractor, Majors Inc., is seeking $125,202 in damages from the Majors Choice Limited Partnership, Shehan & McGee Associates, andits two partners, Robert W. McGee and George Shehan, both of Bel Air.Majors Inc. contends in its suit, filed Sept.
NEWS
By Donald G. Gifford | September 24, 2012
In the coming months, the Maryland Court of Appeals will decide if the state should move to a different system for deciding whether many accident victims - who would not have been injured without the negligence of others - can recover at least partial compensation. Currently, juries in Maryland are not allowed to award these victims even reduced damages from businesses or insured automobile drivers when both the victim and another party are at fault. Even if the injuring party's degree of fault is more egregious than that of the victim, the victim still cannot recover.
SPORTS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | July 18, 1996
Two Baltimore Ravens have bared their talons, preparing to go to battle over the right to retain their name.The Baltimore Raven Wheelchair Basketball Club Inc., founded in 1970, filed suit in U.S. District Court yesterday against the Baltimore Ravens football team and NFL Properties Inc. over the exclusive right to use the Ravens name.The basketball Ravens are asking for unspecified damages for trademark infringement, as well as an injunction prohibiting the team from using the names "Baltimore Ravens" or "Ravens" in the Baltimore market.
NEWS
By Tim Weiner and Tim Weiner,New York Times News Service | March 25, 1995
WASHINGTON -- One official at the Central Intelligence Agency has been removed from his post, and President Clinton has warned that others may follow in the furor raised by theagency's employment of a Guatemalan army colonel, government officials said yesterday.The colonel was linked to the deaths of an American innkeeper and a leftist guerrilla who was the common-law husband of an American lawyer.Mike McCurry, the White House press secretary, said Mr. Clinton would order the dismissal of anyone at the intelligence agency who deliberately withheld information in the case.
BUSINESS
October 16, 2005
Readers often ask what protections they have against problems in a house they bought that are not apparent or don't turn up in a home inspection. Until this month, the general answer in Maryland was "Not much." But now a new state law requires sellers of single-family residences to disclose "latent defects" of which they are aware that threaten the health or safety of the purchaser or an occupant. The new law, which took effect Oct. 1, represents a modest inroad on the long-standing common-law principle of caveat emptor - buyer beware.
NEWS
By Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | January 29, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- A correctional officer held hostage during last summer's uprising at the Maryland Penitentiary asked a Senate committee yesterday to approve a bill to impose sentences of up to 30 years for inmates who participate in such crimes.Lt. William K. Pitts was one of five men taken hostage by prisoners. He and two others were released within an hour, but two were kept in a C Dormitory cell for 23 hours.No one can know what his co-workers, Larry Hughes and Gary Wooten, endured on that hot July day, Mr. Pitts told the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee.
NEWS
By Staff report | July 2, 1993
A 16-year-old Westminster boy led state police on a high-speed chase early Wednesday that ended when he lost control and struck an embankment while attempting to turn right onto Old Baltimore Road.Police records indicate the driver was not injured. His passenger, another Westminster 16-year-old boy, received minor injuries but refused treatment.About 2:40 a.m. Wednesday, Tfc. Leonard Lucas saw a 1981 Ford "operating erratically" on Route 32 in Eldersburg.He signaled the car with siren and lights, but it did not stop.
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