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By RAY JENKINS | December 16, 1994
Five years ago today Judge Robert S. Vance of the federal court of appeals for the 11th circuit opened a package that had just arrived in the mail at his suburban home in Birmingham, Alabama; the box contained a powerful bomb which killed Judge Vance instantly and gravely injured his wife.Two days later Robbie S. Robinson, a black city councilman in Savannah, Georgia, opened a virtually identical package delivered by mail to his law office; both of his arms were blown off in the ensuing explosion, and he died three hours later under surgery.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2013
A Baltimore police detective was convicted by a jury on all counts in a case in which city prosecutors said he had lied about shooting himself in a downtown parking garage and improperly obtained worker's compensation benefits.  Mark Cheshire, a spokesman for the Baltimore State's Attorney's Office, said Det. Anthony Fata was convicted on charges of perjury, misconduct in office and worker's compensation benefits fraud over $10,000.  ...
NEWS
By LARRY CARSON | April 19, 2007
An 18-year-old Columbia man was indicted on murder and riot charges yesterday by a Howard County grand jury. The charges stem from a Feb. 24 melee on the football field at Mount Hebron High School in Ellicott City. Kevin Francis Klink, a former wrestler at Oakland Mills High School, was charged in February with killing Robert Brazell, also 18, by hitting him in the head with a baseball bat during the fight that involved dozens of youths. Police were alerted about 12:30 a.m. Brazell was taken by helicopter to University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center, where he died the next day. The common-law riot charge is new, said Wayne Kirwan, a spokesman for Howard County state's attorney Timothy J. McCrone.
NEWS
by Annie Linskey | May 30, 2012
Maryland's legislative leaders today appointed a bipartisan panel to study the impact of recent court ruling that labeled pit bulls as 'inherently dangerous' for liability purposes and to make recommendations about possible legislative fixes. Five members from each chamber have been named, including three of the five delegates who introduced legislation aimed at overturning the court's ruling during the May special session in Annapolis. The 4-3 decision by the Maryland Court of Appeals came in April after the General Assembly's regular session expired, and drew outrage from dog owners who fear that thousands of pit bulls will be put down.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Evening Sun Staff Raymond L. Sanchez contributed to this story | August 16, 1991
New York City police are still investigating the death of a northwest Baltimore man who was robbed and shot five times as he and his common-law wife sat in a car in Queens.Police are looking for two Hispanic men in their 20s who police said approached Rickey George, 33, of the 3000 block of Mondawmin Ave., and his common-law wife at 1:25 a.m. yesterday as they sat in a rented 1990 Pontiac Sunbird in the 1600 block of Summerfield St. in Ridgewood.They were robbed of about $200 in cash and some jewelry, said Sgt. George Zaroogian, of the 104th precinct in Queens.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff writer | November 10, 1991
A Harford Circuit Court judge has denied a request by a Havre de Grace contracting company for a summary judgment in its civil suit against the developers of the Major's Choice subdivision in Bel Air.Judge Cypert O. Whitfill's order, issued Monday, means that the case will be scheduled for trial. The trial has not been scheduled.The contractor, Majors Inc., is seeking $125,202 in damages from the Majors Choice Limited Partnership, Shehan & McGee Associates, andits two partners, Robert W. McGee and George Shehan, both of Bel Air.Majors Inc. contends in its suit, filed Sept.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2013
Low-risk criminal defendants would no longer have to raise money for bail before trial under a sweeping overhaul of Maryland's centuries-old pretrial release system being considered by a panel set up by the General Assembly. In recommendations released this week, task force members said the state should scrap the system under which poor defendants often remain in jail while more affluent suspects can post bond and get out. The members urged that Maryland replace the system, which is derived from English common law, with one that detains defendants only if they are found to be a flight risk or danger to the community.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 11, 1997
PONTIAC, Mich. -- Saying that any renewed attempt to prosecute Dr. Jack Kevorkian would be "an exercise in futility," the new Oakland County prosecutor, David Gorcyca, dismissed a long list of assisted-suicide charges his predecessor had filed against the retired pathologist and two assistants in October."
NEWS
By Gregory P. Kane | October 14, 1993
DURING the seventh day of deliberations in the case of the two men accused of beating truck driver Reginald Denny during last year's Los Angeles riots, one of the regular jurors was replaced by an alternate. The jurors had to renew deliberations from the beginning, because the alternate was not in on the original deliberations.The juror, an elderly woman known only as Juror 373, was dismissed for "failing to deliberate as the law defines it," the elegant legalese the judge in the case used.
NEWS
By Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | January 29, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- A correctional officer held hostage during last summer's uprising at the Maryland Penitentiary asked a Senate committee yesterday to approve a bill to impose sentences of up to 30 years for inmates who participate in such crimes.Lt. William K. Pitts was one of five men taken hostage by prisoners. He and two others were released within an hour, but two were kept in a C Dormitory cell for 23 hours.No one can know what his co-workers, Larry Hughes and Gary Wooten, endured on that hot July day, Mr. Pitts told the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee.
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