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By LARRY CARSON | April 19, 2007
An 18-year-old Columbia man was indicted on murder and riot charges yesterday by a Howard County grand jury. The charges stem from a Feb. 24 melee on the football field at Mount Hebron High School in Ellicott City. Kevin Francis Klink, a former wrestler at Oakland Mills High School, was charged in February with killing Robert Brazell, also 18, by hitting him in the head with a baseball bat during the fight that involved dozens of youths. Police were alerted about 12:30 a.m. Brazell was taken by helicopter to University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center, where he died the next day. The common-law riot charge is new, said Wayne Kirwan, a spokesman for Howard County state's attorney Timothy J. McCrone.
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NEWS
by Annie Linskey | May 30, 2012
Maryland's legislative leaders today appointed a bipartisan panel to study the impact of recent court ruling that labeled pit bulls as 'inherently dangerous' for liability purposes and to make recommendations about possible legislative fixes. Five members from each chamber have been named, including three of the five delegates who introduced legislation aimed at overturning the court's ruling during the May special session in Annapolis. The 4-3 decision by the Maryland Court of Appeals came in April after the General Assembly's regular session expired, and drew outrage from dog owners who fear that thousands of pit bulls will be put down.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Evening Sun Staff Raymond L. Sanchez contributed to this story | August 16, 1991
New York City police are still investigating the death of a northwest Baltimore man who was robbed and shot five times as he and his common-law wife sat in a car in Queens.Police are looking for two Hispanic men in their 20s who police said approached Rickey George, 33, of the 3000 block of Mondawmin Ave., and his common-law wife at 1:25 a.m. yesterday as they sat in a rented 1990 Pontiac Sunbird in the 1600 block of Summerfield St. in Ridgewood.They were robbed of about $200 in cash and some jewelry, said Sgt. George Zaroogian, of the 104th precinct in Queens.
NEWS
By RAY JENKINS | December 16, 1994
Five years ago today Judge Robert S. Vance of the federal court of appeals for the 11th circuit opened a package that had just arrived in the mail at his suburban home in Birmingham, Alabama; the box contained a powerful bomb which killed Judge Vance instantly and gravely injured his wife.Two days later Robbie S. Robinson, a black city councilman in Savannah, Georgia, opened a virtually identical package delivered by mail to his law office; both of his arms were blown off in the ensuing explosion, and he died three hours later under surgery.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | February 23, 2013
It's one of those things that make sense but we do not do: Have a nickel deposit on every bottle and can of beer, soda and all the other liquid beverages we drink. Maryland does not have it. Some states do. Every state should. I first looked into why Maryland is a no-deposit/no-return state 30 years ago, having been raised where this was done all the time. There have been attempts over the years to get a bottle-deposit law passed in Maryland, but it was always shot down. Tom Horton, my former columnist colleague at The Sun, once cited polls showing that as many as seven out of 10 Marylanders supported the idea.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,Sun Staff Correspondent | November 20, 1990
ANNAPOLIS -- Maryland's first murder conviction without a victim's body as evidence was overturned yesterday by the Court of Special Appeals -- but not because of the circumstances that made the case unique.The court ruled that evidence used against Gregory Mung-Sen Tu, 61, who was charged with killing his common-law wife in July 1988 and disposing of her body, was improperly obtained. The judges sent the case back to Montgomery County for a new trial.But Richard B. Rosenblatt, the assistant attorney general who argued the case, said he would first ask the Court of Appeals, Maryland's highest court, to review the decision.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 11, 1997
PONTIAC, Mich. -- Saying that any renewed attempt to prosecute Dr. Jack Kevorkian would be "an exercise in futility," the new Oakland County prosecutor, David Gorcyca, dismissed a long list of assisted-suicide charges his predecessor had filed against the retired pathologist and two assistants in October."
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | December 21, 2013
During the Christmas season when many celebrate a unique and miraculous birth, what the late Pope John Paul II called "a culture of death" continues its march. Last week, the upper house of the Belgian Senate voted to extend a 2002 law legalizing euthanasia for adults so that it includes incurably ill children. The amended law will now have to be voted on by the Parliament's lower house, a vote expected to take place before elections in May, but if passed, writes The New York Times, children afflicted with "constant and unbearable physical suffering" and "equipped with a capacity for discernment" could then be legally euthanized in Belgium.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2013
A Baltimore police detective was convicted by a jury on all counts in a case in which city prosecutors said he had lied about shooting himself in a downtown parking garage and improperly obtained worker's compensation benefits.  Mark Cheshire, a spokesman for the Baltimore State's Attorney's Office, said Det. Anthony Fata was convicted on charges of perjury, misconduct in office and worker's compensation benefits fraud over $10,000.  ...
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff writer | November 10, 1991
A Harford Circuit Court judge has denied a request by a Havre de Grace contracting company for a summary judgment in its civil suit against the developers of the Major's Choice subdivision in Bel Air.Judge Cypert O. Whitfill's order, issued Monday, means that the case will be scheduled for trial. The trial has not been scheduled.The contractor, Majors Inc., is seeking $125,202 in damages from the Majors Choice Limited Partnership, Shehan & McGee Associates, andits two partners, Robert W. McGee and George Shehan, both of Bel Air.Majors Inc. contends in its suit, filed Sept.
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