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By Ann G. Sjoerdsma | February 20, 2000
KITTY HAWK, N.C. -- The large sign next to the four roadside crosses reads "DRINKING + DRIVING CAN COST YOU A PRECIOUS GEM." Garnished in flowers, each simple white cross bears a name: Megan, Angie, Amanda, Shana. On April 6, 1999, at this site on Highway 158 in Kill Devil Hills, four 17-year-old girls last saw each other. The crash instantly killed Megan Blong, Angie McGrady and Amanda Geiger, all from New Jersey. Shana Lawler, whose family had recently moved to North Carolina's Outer Banks, died six days later.
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NEWS
By New York Times | March 18, 1993
PHILADELPHIA -- In mid-January, Shilie Turner, 17, a high school senior who was one of the nation's most promising young female track stars, vanished from her neighborhood in the Overbrook section.Her mother made a series of emotional public appeals for her safe return, but a month later Miss Turner's body was found, hidden by bushes in a local park. She had been beaten and then shot six times.Now her mother, Vivian King, 42, has been charged with her murder, and acquaintances of the family have been left to wonder whether they should have paid closer attention to Miss Turner's complaints of an unhappy home life, and to her loud quarrels with her mother.
BUSINESS
By Keith Henderson and Keith Henderson,Christian Science Monitor | October 10, 1993
BOSTON -- Long before the first zoning regulation specifying house-lot size, governments put restrictions on what citizens could do with their land. So-called "nuisance" ordinances, which forbid land uses that would damage or threaten neighbors' interests, hark back to English common law.The influx of environmental laws in the United States over the past two decades has put private property under a whole new set of restrictions. A recent example of these constraints involves Killington Ltd., Vermont's largest ski resort operator.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN REPORTER | April 17, 2008
The state's highest court ruled yesterday that a man can be charged with rape if he ignores a woman's calls to stop - even if she had previously consented to sex. With this expansion of the legal definition of rape, Maryland joins seven other states whose courts have determined that a woman can revoke her consent after intercourse begins. "This goes to the heart of women's autonomy," said Lisae C. Jordan, legal director of the Maryland Coalition Against Sexual Assault, which filed a brief in the matter.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 11, 1997
PONTIAC, Mich. -- Saying that any renewed attempt to prosecute Dr. Jack Kevorkian would be "an exercise in futility," the new Oakland County prosecutor, David Gorcyca, dismissed a long list of assisted-suicide charges his predecessor had filed against the retired pathologist and two assistants in October."
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff writer | November 10, 1991
A Harford Circuit Court judge has denied a request by a Havre de Grace contracting company for a summary judgment in its civil suit against the developers of the Major's Choice subdivision in Bel Air.Judge Cypert O. Whitfill's order, issued Monday, means that the case will be scheduled for trial. The trial has not been scheduled.The contractor, Majors Inc., is seeking $125,202 in damages from the Majors Choice Limited Partnership, Shehan & McGee Associates, andits two partners, Robert W. McGee and George Shehan, both of Bel Air.Majors Inc. contends in its suit, filed Sept.
NEWS
By Justin George and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
Montgomery County police investigators suspect a Clarksburg mother killed two young children who have been missing for more than a week, police said on Monday. Sarah Hoggle, 3, and Jacob Hoggle, 2, have been missing since Sept. 8. Authorities are investigating their mother, Catherine Hoggle, 27, in their possible deaths. Hoggle had also gone missing for a few days after her common-law husband became suspicious about the kids' whereabouts. "We keep a ray of hope that Sarah and Jacob will be reunited with their family," Police Capt.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,SUN STAFF | June 1, 2005
The last person to be sentenced in a broad investigation into death benefits stolen from the federal government has been sentenced to two years in prison, prosecutors in Maryland said yesterday. U.S. District Judge Peter J. Messitte in Greenbelt sentenced Marjorie A. McGaha, 61, of Washington after she pleaded guilty to stealing more than $430,000 in survivor's annuity payments from the Civil Service Retirement Trust Fund. McGaha was the last of 17 people to be sentenced in a six-year scheme that involved the fraudulent payment of almost $4 million, according to the U.S. attorney's office in Maryland.
NEWS
By Staff report | July 2, 1993
A 16-year-old Westminster boy led state police on a high-speed chase early Wednesday that ended when he lost control and struck an embankment while attempting to turn right onto Old Baltimore Road.Police records indicate the driver was not injured. His passenger, another Westminster 16-year-old boy, received minor injuries but refused treatment.About 2:40 a.m. Wednesday, Tfc. Leonard Lucas saw a 1981 Ford "operating erratically" on Route 32 in Eldersburg.He signaled the car with siren and lights, but it did not stop.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,SUN REPORTER | September 17, 2006
In the news Represented Mount Vernon-area residents who challenged the Archdiocese of Baltimore's demolition of the Rochambeau, a 100-year-old apartment building at North Charles and West Franklin streets in Baltimore. Occupation Lawyer with Liebmann and Shively. Also executive director of the Calvert Institute for Policy Research. Author of eight nonfiction books, most recently The Common Law Tradition: A Collective Portrait of Five Legal Scholars. Career highlights Came to Baltimore in 1963 as law clerk to Court of Appeals Chief Judge Frederick W. Brune.
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